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Vazgen I
Vazgen I
Vazgen I
also Vazken I of Bucharest, (Armenian: Վազգէն Ա Բուխարեստցի), born Levon Garabed Baljian (Armenian: Լևոն Կարապետ Աբրահամի Պալճյան; September 20, 1908 – August 18, 1994)[1] was the Catholicos of All Armenians between 1955 and 1994, for a total of 39 years, in one of the longest reigns of the Armenian Catholicoi. Vazgen I, has the 4th longest reign in the history of the Armenian Apostolic Church together with:Peter I (1019–1058) — Պետրոս Ա Գետադարձ (Catholicos of All Armenians), Gregory II the Martyrophile (1066–1105) — Գրիգոր Բ. Վկայասէր (Catholicos of the Great House of Cilicia) and David IV (1590–1629), d
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University Of Bucharest
The University
University
of Bucharest
Bucharest
(Romanian: Universitatea din București), commonly known after its abbreviation UB in Romania, is a public university founded in 1864 by decree of Prince Alexandru Ioan Cuza
Alexandru Ioan Cuza
to convert the former Saint Sava
Saint Sava
Academy into the current University
University
of Bucharest, making it the second oldest modern university in Romania. It is one of the five members of the Universitaria Consortium (the group of elite Romanian universities).[2] The University
University
of Bucharest
Bucharest
offers study programmes in Romanian and English and is classified as an advanced research and education university by the Ministry of Education
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Doctor Of Theology
Doctor of Theology
Theology
(Latin: Doctor Theologiae, abbreviated D.Th., Th.D., D.Theol., or Dr. theol.) is a terminal degree in the academic discipline of theology. The Th.D. is an advanced research degree equivalent to the Doctor of Philosophy.[1][2]Contents1 Terminology1.1 United States 1.2 United Kingdom2 ReferencesTerminology[edit] In the academic study of theology, which is deeply rooted in the Christian tradition, doctoral students are often conferred a Doctor of Theology, a Doctor of Philosophy, a Doctor of Ministry, or a Doctor of Practical Theology. However, the Doctor of Ministry is generally understood as a professional doctorate. United States[edit] In the United States, some of the older theological seminaries began offering the Doctor of Theology
Theology
as an equivalent to the research Doctor of Philosophy
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Vanadzor
Coordinates: 40°48′46″N 44°29′18″E / 40.81278°N 44.48833°E / 40.81278; 44.48833 Vanadzor
Vanadzor
(Armenian: Վանաձոր pronounced [vɑnɑˈdzɔɾ]), is an urban municipal community and the third-largest city in Armenia
Armenia
serving as the capital of Lori Province in the northern part of the country. It is located around 128 kilometres (80 miles) north of the capital Yerevan. As of the 2011 census, the city had a population of 86,199, down from 148,876 reported at the 1979 official census. Currently, the town has an approximate population of 82,200 as per the 2016 official estimate. The city is in a picturesque setting, with an attractive planned town centre
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Armenian Catholic Church
The Armenian Catholic Church
Catholic Church
(Armenian: Հայ Կաթողիկէ Եկեղեցի, translit. Hay Kat’oġikē Ekeġec’i; Latin: Ecclesia armeno-catholica), alternatively known as the Armenian Uniate Church,[2][3] is one of the Eastern particular churches sui iuris of the Catholic Church. They accept the leadership of the Bishop of Rome, known as the papal primacy, and therefore are in full communion with the Catholic Church, including both the Latin Church
Latin Church
and the 22 other Eastern Catholic Churches
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Alex Manoogian
Alexander "Alex" Manoogian (Armenian: Ալեք Մանուկեան, June 28, 1901 – July 10, 1996) was an Armenian-American
Armenian-American
industrial engineer, businessman, entrepreneur and philanthropist who had most of his career in Detroit, Michigan. He is the founder of the Masco Corporation,[1] which in 1969[2] was listed on the NYSE
NYSE
(XNYS:MAS).[3] In 1954 he patented and brought to market the first successful washerless ball valve faucet, the Delta faucet, named for the faucet cam shaped like the fourth letter of the Greek alphabet[4] He and his wife Marie donated the Manoogian Mansion
Manoogian Mansion
to the city of Detroit, which uses it as the official residence of the Mayor
Mayor
of Detroit, MI
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Religious Freedom
Freedom of religion
Freedom of religion
is a principle that supports the freedom of an individual or community, in public or private, to manifest religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship, and observance without government influence or intervention. It also includes the freedom to change one's religion or belief.[1] Freedom of religion
Freedom of religion
is considered by many people and most of the nations to be a fundamental human right.[2][3] In a country with a state religion, freedom of religion is generally considered to mean that the government permits religious practices of other sects besides the state religion, and does not persecute believers in other faiths. Freedom of belief is different
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Totalitarianism
Totalitarianism
Totalitarianism
is a political concept where the state recognizes no limits to its authority and strives to regulate every aspect of public and private life wherever feasible.[1] Totalitarian regimes stay in political power through rule by one leader and an all-encompassing propaganda campaign, which is disseminated through the state-controlled mass media, a single party that is often marked by political repression, personality cultism, control over the economy, regulation and restriction of speech, mass surveillance and widespread use of terror. A distinctive feature of totalitarian governments is an "elaborate ideology, a set of ideas that gives meaning and direction to the whole society".[2] The concept was first developed in the 1920s by the Weimar German jurist and later Nazi academic Carl Schmitt
Carl Schmitt
as well as Italian fascists
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Greece
Greece
Greece
(Greek: Ελλάδα), officially the Hellenic Republic (Ελληνική Δημοκρατία), historically also known as Hellas, is a country located in Southern Europe,[10] with a population of approximately 11 million as of 2016. Athens
Athens
is the nation's capital and largest city, followed by Thessaloniki. Greece
Greece
is located at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Situated on the southern tip of the Balkan Peninsula, it shares land borders with Albania
Albania
to the northwest, the Republic of Macedonia
Republic of Macedonia
and Bulgaria
Bulgaria
to the north, and Turkey
Turkey
to the northeast
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Athens
Athens
Athens
(/ˈæθɪnz/;[3] Greek: Αθήνα, Athína [aˈθina], Ancient Greek: Ἀθῆναι, Athênai [a.tʰɛ̂ː.nai̯]) is the capital and largest city of Greece
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Tombstone
A headstone, tombstone, or gravestone is a stele or marker, usually stone, that is placed over a grave. They are traditional for burials in the Christian, Jewish and Muslim religions, among others. In most cases they have the deceased's name, date of birth, and date of death inscribed on them, along with a personal message, or prayer, but they may contain pieces of funerary art, especially details in stone relief. In many parts of Europe insetting a photograph of the deceased in a frame is very common.Contents1 Use 2 Materials2.1 Stone 2.2 Metal, wood and plants3 Inscriptions 4 Form and decoration 5 Safety 6 Image gallery 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksUse[edit] Marble
Marble
headstone of a couple buried together in Singapore, showing an arched emblem, signifying the reunification with one's partner in heaven
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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History Of The Soviet Union (1985–1991)
The history of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
from 1982 through 1991 spans the period from Leonid Brezhnev's death and funeral until the dissolution of the Soviet Union. Due to the years of Soviet military buildup at the expense of domestic development, economic growth stagnated. Failed attempts at reform, a standstill economy, and the success of the United States
United States
against the Soviet Union's forces in the war in Afghanistan
Afghanistan
led to a general feeling of discontent, especially in the Baltic republics and Eastern Europe.[1] Greater political and social freedoms, instituted by the last Soviet leader, Mikhail Gorbachev, created an atmosphere of open criticism of the communist regime
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Soviet Union
The Soviet Union
Soviet Union
(Russian: Сове́тский Сою́з, tr. Sovétsky Soyúz, IPA: [sɐˈvʲɛt͡skʲɪj sɐˈjus] ( listen)), officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Russian: Сою́з Сове́тских Социалисти́ческих Респу́блик, tr. Soyúz Sovétskikh Sotsialistícheskikh Respúblik, IPA: [sɐˈjus sɐˈvʲɛtskʲɪx sətsɨəlʲɪsˈtʲitɕɪskʲɪx rʲɪˈspublʲɪk] ( listen)), abbreviated as the USSR (Russian: СССР, tr. SSSR), was a socialist state in Eurasia
Eurasia
that existed from 1922 to 1991. Nominally a union of multiple national Soviet republics,[a] its government and economy were highly centralized. The country was a one-party state, governed by the Communist Party with Moscow
Moscow
as its capital in its largest republic, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic
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Isaac Of Armenia
Isaac or Sahak of Armenia (354–439) was Catholicos (or Patriarch) of the Armenian Apostolic Church. He is sometimes known as "Isaac the Great," and as "Sahak the Parthian" (Armenian: Սահակ Պարթև, Sahak Parthev", Parthian: Sahak-i Parthaw) owing to his Parthian origin.Contents1 Family 2 Life 3 References 4 SourcesFamily[edit] Isaac was son of the Christian St. Nerses I
St. Nerses I
and the Mamikonian Princess called Sanducht. Through his father he was a Gregorid and was descended from the family of St. Gregory I the Enlightener. He was the fifth Catholicos of the Arsacid dynasty of Armenia
Arsacid dynasty of Armenia
after St. Gregory I the Enlightener (301–325), St. Aristaces I (325–333), St. Vrtanes I (333–341) and St. Husik I (341–347)
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