HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Vamana Purana
Vamana
Vamana
(Sanskrit: वामन, IAST: Vāmana, lit. dwarf), is the fifth avatar of Hindu god Vishnu.[1][2] He incarnates in a time of crisis to restore cosmic balance by creatively defeating the Asura king Mahabali, who had acquired disproportionate power over the universe. According to Hindu mythology, the noble demon king sponsors a sacrifice and gift giving ceremony to consolidate his power, and Vishnu
Vishnu
appears at this ceremony as a dwarf mendicant called Vamana.[1] When Vamana's turn comes to receive a gift, Mahabali
Mahabali
offers him whatever riches and material wealth he would like, but Vamana
Vamana
refuses everything and states he would just like three paces of land. Mahabali finds the dwarf's request amusingly small and irrevocably grants it.[1] Vamana
Vamana
then grows into a giant of cosmic proportions
[...More...]

"Vamana Purana" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Kāśikāvṛttī
The Kāśikāvṛttī ("the commentary of [composed or used in] Kāśi, i.e. Varanasi") is a commentary on Pāṇini, attributed to Jayaditya and Vamana, composed in c. the 7th century. It is considered the "fourth great grammar" of Sanskrit, after Pāṇini himself (4th century BCE), Patanjali's Mahabhasya (2nd century BCE) and Bhartrhari's Vakyapadiya (6th century CE). See also[edit]Sanskrit grammarians Bhaṭṭikāvya Bhaṭṭoji DīkṣitaReferences[edit]Aryendra Sharma, Kasika - a commentary on Pāṇini's grammar by Vamana and Jayaditya. Hyderabad : Osmania University, Sanskrit Academy 1969-1985. P. Haag and V
[...More...]

"Kāśikāvṛttī" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Matsya
Matsya
Matsya
(Sanskrit: मत्स्य, lit. fish), is the fish avatar in the ten primary avatars of Hindu god
Hindu god
Vishnu. Matsya
Matsya
is described to have rescued Manu and earthly existence from a great deluge. The earliest accounts of Matsya
Matsya
as a fish-saviour equates him with the Vedic deity Prajapati. The fish-savior later merges with the identity of Brahma
Brahma
in post-Vedic era, and still later as an avatar of Vishnu.[1][2][3] The legends associated with Matsya
Matsya
expand, evolve and vary in Hindu texts
[...More...]

"Matsya" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kurma
Kurma
Kurma
(Sanskrit: कूर्म; Kūrma, lit. turtle) is the second Avatar
Avatar
of Vishnu. Like other avatars of Vishnu, Kurma
Kurma
appears at a time of crisis to restore the cosmic equilibrium.[1] His iconography is either a tortoise, or more commonly as half man-half tortoise.[2] These are found in many Vaishnava temple ceilings or wall reliefs.[3][4] The earliest account of Kurma
Kurma
is found in the Shatapatha Brahmana (Yajur veda), where he is a form of Prajapati- Brahma
Brahma
and helps with the samudra manthan (churning of cosmic ocean).[5] In the Epics and the Puranas, the legend expands and evolves into many versions, with Kurma
Kurma
becoming an avatar of Vishnu
[...More...]

"Kurma" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Deva (Hinduism)
Deva (/ˈdeɪvə/; Sanskrit: देव, Devá) means "heavenly, divine, anything of excellence", and is also one of the terms for a deity in Hinduism.[1] Deva is a masculine term; the feminine equivalent is devi. In the earliest Vedic literature, all supernatural beings are called Asuras.[2][3] The concepts and legends evolve in ancient Indian literature, and by the late Vedic period, benevolent supernatural beings are referred to as Deva-Asuras
[...More...]

"Deva (Hinduism)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Varaha
Varaha
Varaha
(Sanskrit: वराह, IAST:Varāha) is the avatar of the Hindu god Vishnu
Vishnu
who takes the form of a boar to rescue goddess earth.[1] Varaha
Varaha
is listed as third in the Dashavatara, the ten principal avatars of Vishnu.[1][2][3] In a symbolic Hindu mythology, when the demon Hiranyaksha
Hiranyaksha
tormented the earth (personified as the goddess Bhudevi) and its inhabitants, she sinks into the primordial waters. Vishnu
Vishnu
took the form of the Varaha, descended into the depths of the oceans to rescue her. Varaha slew the demon and retrieved the Earth from the ocean, lifting her on his tusks, and restored Bhudevi
Bhudevi
to her place in the universe.[1][4][5] Varaha
Varaha
may be depicted completely as a boar or in an anthropomorphic form, with a boar's head and human body
[...More...]

"Varaha" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Narasimha
Narasimha
Narasimha
(Sanskrit: नरसिंह IAST: Narasiṃha, lit. man-lion) is an avatar of the Hindu god Vishnu, one who incarnates in the form of part lion and part man to destroy an evil, end religious persecution and calamity on Earth, thereby restoring Dharma.[2][1] Narasimha
Narasimha
iconography shows him with a human torso and lower body, with a lion face and claws, typically with a demon Hiranyakashipu
Hiranyakashipu
in his lap whom he is in the process of killing
[...More...]

"Narasimha" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Sukracharya
Shukra (Sanskrit: शुक्र, IAST: Śukra) is a Sanskrit word that means "lucid, clear, bright". It also has other meanings, such as the name of an ancient sage who counseled Asuras in Vedic mythology.[1] In medieval mythology and Hindu astrology, the term refers to the planet Venus, one of the Navagrahas.[2]Contents1 Mythology 2 Planet 3 Calendar and zodiac 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingMythology[edit] In one mythology, Shukra is the name of a son of Bhrigu, of the third Manu, one of the saptarishis. He was the guru of Daityas / Asuras, and is also referred to as Shukracharya or Asuracharya in various Hindu texts
[...More...]

"Sukracharya" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Umbrella
An umbrella or parasol is a folding canopy supported by wooden or metal ribs, which is usually mounted on a wooden, metal, or plastic pole. It is designed to protect a person against rain or sunlight. The word "umbrella" typically refers to a device used for protection from rain. The word parasol usually refers to an item designed to protect from the sun. Often the difference is the material used for the canopy; some parasols are not waterproof. Umbrella
Umbrella
canopies may be made of fabric or flexible plastic. Umbrellas and parasols are primarily hand-held portable devices sized for personal use. The largest hand-portable umbrellas are golf umbrellas. Umbrellas can be divided into two categories: fully collapsible umbrellas, in which the metal pole supporting the canopy retracts, making the umbrella small enough to fit in a handbag; and non-collapsible umbrellas, in which the support pole cannot retract and only the canopy can be collapsed
[...More...]

"Umbrella" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Virochana
Virochana (Sanskrit: विरोचन), in Hindu mythology, was grandson of Hiranyakashipu, son of Prahlada (Sanskrit: प्रह्लाद) and father of Bali. In the Atharvaveda (VIII.10.22) he was mentioned as the son of Prahlada.[1] According to the Chandogya Upanishad (VIII.7.2-8.5), he and Indra went to Prajapati to learn about the atman (self) and lived there, practising brahmacharya for thirty-two years. But at the end, he misunderstood Prajapati's teachings and preached the asuras to worship the sharira (body) as the atman. Thus, asuras started adorning the body of a deceased with perfumes, garlands and ornaments.[2] The son of Virochana was Mahabali.[3] Notes[edit]^ Griffith, Ralph T.H. (1895). "Hymns of the Atharva Veda, Book 8, Hymn 10". The Internet Sacred Text Archive website. Retrieved 2009-11-12.  ^ "Chandogya Upanishad" (PDF). Maharishi University of Management website. pp. 151–2. Retrieved 2009-11-12.  ^ Gopal, Madan (1990). K.S. Gautam, ed
[...More...]

"Virochana" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Balarama
Balarama
Balarama
(Sanskrit: बलराम, IAST: Balarāma) is a Hindu deity and the elder brother of Krishna
Krishna
(an avatar of the god Vishnu)
[...More...]

"Balarama" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Indra
Indra
Indra
(/ˈɪndrə/, Sanskrit: इन्द्र) is a Vedic deity in Hinduism,[1] a guardian deity in Buddhism,[2] and the king of the highest heaven called Saudharmakalpa in Jainism.[3] His mythologies and powers are similar, though not identical to those of the Indo-European deities such as Zeus, Jupiter, Perun, Thor, and Odin (Wotan).[1][4][5] In the Vedas, Indra
Indra
is the king of Svarga
Svarga
(Heaven) and the Devas. He is the god of the heavens, lightning, thunder, storms, rains and river flows.[6] Indra
Indra
is the most referred to deity in the Rigveda.[7] He is celebrated for his powers, and the one who kills the great symbolic evil (Asura) named Vritra
Vritra
who obstructs human prosperity and happiness
[...More...]

"Indra" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Krishna
Krishna
Krishna
(/ˈkrɪʃnə/,[8] [ˈkr̩ʂɳə] ( listen); Sanskrit: कृष्ण, translit. Kṛṣṇa) is a major deity in Hinduism. He is worshiped as the eighth avatar of the god Vishnu
Vishnu
and also as the supreme God
God
in his own right.[9] He is the god of compassion, tenderness, and love in Hinduism,[1][2] and is one of the most popular and widely revered among Indian divinities.[10] Krishna's birthday is celebrated every year by Hindus on Janmashtami according to the lunisolar Hindu
Hindu
calendar, which falls in late August or early September of the Gregorian calendar.[11] Krishna
Krishna
is also known by numerous names, such as Govinda, Mukunda, Madhusudhana, Vasudeva, and Makhan chor. The anecdotes and narratives of Krishna's life are generally titled as Krishna
Krishna
Leela
[...More...]

"Krishna" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Adityas
In Hinduism, Âdityas (Sanskrit: आदित्य, pronounced [ɑːd̪it̪jɐ]), meaning "of Aditi", refers to the offspring of the goddess Aditi
Aditi
and her husband the sage Kashyapa.[1] The name, Aditya, in the singular, is taken to refer to the Sun God, Surya. The Rig Veda
[...More...]

"Adityas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gautama Buddha In Hinduism
In Vaishnava Hinduism, the historic Buddha
Buddha
or Gautama Buddha, is considered to be an avatar of the Hindu god Vishnu.[1] Of the ten major avatars of Vishnu, Vaishnavites believe Gautama Buddha
Gautama Buddha
to be the ninth and most recent incarnation.[2][3] Buddha's portrayal in Hinduism varies. In some texts such as the Puranas, he is portrayed as an avatar born to mislead those who deny the Vedic knowledge.[3][4][note 1] In others, such as the 13th-century Gitagovinda of Vaishnava poet Jayadeva, Vishnu
Vishnu
incarnates as the Buddha
Buddha
to teach and to end animal slaughter.[2] In contemporary Hinduism, state Constance Jones and James D
[...More...]

"Gautama Buddha In Hinduism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aditi
In the Vedas, Aditi
Aditi
(Sanskrit: अदिति "limitless")[1] is mother of the gods (devamata) and all twelve zodiacal spirits from whose cosmic matrix, the heavenly bodies were born. As celestial mother of every existing form and being, the synthesis of all things, she is associated with space (akasa) and with mystic speech (Vāc). She may be seen as a feminized form of Brahma
Brahma
and associated with the primal substance (mulaprakriti) in Vedanta
[...More...]

"Aditi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.