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Valerie And Her Week Of Wonders
Valerie and Her Week of Wonders
Valerie and Her Week of Wonders
(Czech: Valerie a týden divů) is a novel by surrealist Czech writer Vítězslav Nezval, written in 1935 and first published ten years afterward in 1945. The avant-garde experimental novel was written before Nezval's dramatic shift to Socialist Realism
Socialist Realism
and allegiance to Stalin. It was made into a 1970 Czech film directed by Jaromil Jireš, an example of Czech New Wave cinema. With this novel, Nezval explored the gothic themes and settings of such novels as Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
Frankenstein
(1818) and M. G. Lewis' The Monk (1796), as well as F. W. Murnau's film Nosferatu
Nosferatu
(1922; based on Dracula
Dracula
[1897] by Bram Stoker). The novel has long been available in Czech
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Illustrations
An illustration is a decoration, interpretation or visual explanation of a text, concept or process,[1] designed for integration in published media, such as posters, flyers, magazines, books, teaching materials, animations, video games and films. The origin of the word “illustration” is late Middle English (in the sense ‘illumination; spiritual or intellectual enlightenment’): via Old French from Latin illustratio(n- ), from the verb illustrate.[2]Contents1 Contemporary illustration 2 Technical and scientific illustration 3 Illustration
Illustration
as fine art 4 History4.1 Early history 4.2 19th Century 4.3 The
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Stalin
Joseph Vissarionovich Stalin[note 1] (18 December 1878 – 5 March 1953) was a Soviet revolutionary and politician of Georgian ethnicity. Governing the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
from the mid-1920s until his death in 1953, he served as General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
from 1922 to 1952 and as Premier of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
from 1941 to 1953. Initially heading a collective one-party state government, by 1937 he was the country's de facto dictator. Ideologically a Marxist and a Leninist, Stalin helped to formalise these ideas as Marxism– Leninism
Leninism
while his own policies became known as Stalinism. Raised into a poor family in Gori, Russian Empire, as a youth Stalin joined the Marxist Russian Social Democratic Labour Party
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Bram Stoker
Abraham "Bram" Stoker (8 November 1847 – 20 April 1912) was an Irish author, best known today for his 1897 Gothic novel Dracula. During his lifetime, he was better known as the personal assistant of actor Henry Irving
Henry Irving
and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned.Contents1 Early life 2 Early career 3 Lyceum Theatre 4 Writings 5 Death 6 Beliefs and philosophy 7 Posthumous7.1 Dacre Stoker8 Commemorations 9 Bibliography9.1 Novels 9.2 Short story collections 9.3 Uncollected stories 9.4 Non-fiction 9.5 Articles 9.6 Critical works on Stoker 9.7 Bibliog
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Dracula
Dracula
Dracula
is an 1897 Gothic horror
Gothic horror
novel by Irish author Bram Stoker
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Nosferatu
Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens (translated as Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror; or simply Nosferatu) is a 1922 German Expressionist horror film, directed by F. W. Murnau, starring Max Schreck as the vampire Count Orlok. The film, shot in 1921 and released in 1922, was an unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula
Dracula
(1897). Various names and other details were changed from the novel: for instance, "vampire" became "Nosferatu" and "Count Dracula" became "Count Orlok". Stoker's heirs sued over the adaptation, and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed
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F. W. Murnau
Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau (born Friedrich Wilhelm Plumpe; December 28, 1888 – March 11, 1931) was a German film director. Murnau was greatly influenced by Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Ibsen plays he had seen at the age of 12, and became a friend of director Max Reinhardt. During World War I
World War I
he served as a company commander at the eastern front and was in the German air force, surviving several crashes without any severe injuries.[1] One of Murnau's acclaimed works is the 1922 film Nosferatu, an adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula. Although not a commercial success due to copyright issues with Stoker's novel, the film is considered a masterpiece of Expressionist film. He later directed the 1924 film The Last Laugh, as well as a 1926 interpretation of Goethe's Faust
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The Monk
The Monk: A Romance is a Gothic novel
Gothic novel
by Matthew Gregory Lewis, published in 1796. A quickly written book from early in Lewis's career (in one letter he claimed to have written it in ten weeks, but other correspondence suggests that he had at least started it, or something similar, a couple of years earlier[1]), it was published before he turned twenty. It is a prime example of the male Gothic that specialises in the aspect of horror
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Matthew Lewis (writer)
Matthew Gregory Lewis (9 July 1775 – 14 or 16 May 1818[1]) was an English novelist and dramatist, often referred to as "Monk" Lewis, because of the success of his 1796 Gothic novel, The Monk.Contents1 Biography1.1 Family 1.2 Education 1.3 Professional life2 Reception of his work 3 Works 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksBiography[edit] Family[edit] Lewis was the first-born child of Matthew and Frances Maria Sewell Lewis. His father, Matthew Lewis, was the son of William Lewis and Jane Gregory and was born in England in 1750. He attended Westminster School before proceeding to Christ Church, Oxford, where he received his bachelor's degree in 1769 and his master's in 1772. During his time at Westminster, Lewis's parents separated, and he idolized his mother without disregarding his father
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Frankenstein
Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus
Prometheus
is a novel written by English author Mary Shelley
Mary Shelley
(1797–1851) that tells the story of Victor Frankenstein, a young scientist who creates a grotesque but sapient creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment
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Mary Shelley
Mary Wollstonecraft
Mary Wollstonecraft
Shelley
Shelley
(née Godwin; 30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, and travel writer, best known for her Gothic novel Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus
Prometheus
(1818). She also edited and promoted the works of her husband, the Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley. Her father was the political philosopher William Godwin, and her mother was the philosopher and feminist Mary
Mary
Wollstonecraft. After Wollstonecraft's death less than a month after her daughter Mary was born, Mary
Mary
was raised by Godwin, who was able to provide his daughter with a rich, if informal, education, encouraging her to adhere to his own liberal political theories
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Gothic Novel
Gothic fiction, which is largely known by the subgenre of Gothic horror, is a genre or mode of literature and film that combines fiction and horror, death, and at times romance or happiness. Its origin is attributed to English author Horace Walpole, with his 1764 novel The Castle
Castle
of Otranto, subtitled (in its second edition) "A Gothic Story". The effect of Gothic fiction
Gothic fiction
feeds on a pleasing sort of terror, an extension of Romantic literary pleasures that were relatively new at the time of Walpole's novel. It originated in England in the second half of the 18th century where, following Walpole, it was further developed by Clara Reeve, Ann Radcliffe, William Thomas Beckford
William Thomas Beckford
and Matthew Lewis
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Czech Republic
The Czech Republic
Republic
(/ˈtʃɛk -/ (listen);[12] Czech: Česká republika [ˈtʃɛskaː ˈrɛpublɪka] (listen)),[13] also known by its short-form name, Czechia[14] (/ˈtʃɛkiə/ (listen); Czech: Česko [ˈtʃɛsko] (listen)), is a country in Central Europe
Europe
bordered by Germany
Germany
to the west, Austria
Austria
to the south, Slovakia
Slovakia
to the east and Poland
Poland
to the northeast.[15] The Czech Republic
Republic
has a landlocked and hilly landscape that covers an area of 78,866 square kilometers (30,450 sq mi) with a mostly temperate continental climate and oceanic climate. It is a unitary parliamentary republic, with 10.6 million inhabitants
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Socialist Realism
Socialist realism
Socialist realism
is a style of idealized realistic art that was developed in the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and was imposed as the official style in that country between 1932 and 1988, as well as in other socialist countries after World War II. [1] Socialist realism
Socialist realism
is characterized by the glorified depiction of communist values, such as the emancipation of the proletariat, by means of realistic imagery.[2] Although related, it should not be confused with social realism, a type of art that realistically depicts subjects of social concern.[3] Socialist realism
Socialist realism
was the predominant form of approved art in the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
from its development in the early 1920s to its eventual fall from official status beginning in the late 1960s until the breakup of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
in 1991
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Czech Language
Czech (/tʃɛk/; čeština Czech pronunciation: [ˈtʃɛʃcɪna]), historically also Bohemian[6] (/boʊˈhiːmiən, bə-/;[7] lingua Bohemica in Latin), is a West Slavic language of the Czech–Slovak group.[6] Spoken by over 10 million people, it serves as the official language of the Czech Republic. Czech is closely related to Slovak, to the point of mutual intelligibility to a very high degree.[8] Like other Slavic languages, Czech is a fusional language with a rich system of morphology and relatively flexible word order. Its vocabulary has been extensively influenced by Latin[9] and German.[10] The Czech–Slovak group developed within West Slavic in the high medieval period, and the standardization of Czech and Slovak within the Czech–Slovak dialect continuum emerged in the early modern period
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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