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Vahan Mamikonian
Vahan Mamikonian
Mamikonian
(Armenian: Վահան Մամիկոնյան) (440/445 – 503/510) was an Armenian nobleman from the Mamikonian
Mamikonian
family. In 481 he rebelled against the Sasanian Empire
Sasanian Empire
that controlled the eastern part of Armenia known as Persian Armenia. He was appointed as marzban (governor) of Persian Armenia
Persian Armenia
in 485 and remained in that post until his death around 503-510.Contents1 Background 2 Youth 3 Revolt 4 Marzban of Armenia 5 Family tree 6 References 7 BibliographyBackground[edit] Since 387, the kingdom of Armenia was divided into two zones of influence, Byzantine Armenia
Byzantine Armenia
and Persian Armenia
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Vachagan III
Vachagan III the Pious was the last king of Caucasian Albania
Caucasian Albania
from the Arsacid Dynasty. He was a brother of Vache II and was restored to throne by Balash. During his reign Church of Caucasian Albania
Church of Caucasian Albania
was growing. Vachagan persecuted pagans and opened religious schools in country. He recovered Grigoris' and Saint Pantaleon's relics and buried then in a tomb within the Amaras Monastery
Amaras Monastery
with help of his extra-marital uncle Khochkorik.[1] He named his son in honour of Saint Pantaleon. Aluen Ecumenical Council[edit] He held an ecumenical council in town of Aluen in 488. Aluen Ecumenical Council thus holds special status in history of Caucasian Albania, because it is only legal information about socio-religious life of Caucasian Albania
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Arax River
The Aras or Araxes is a river flowing through Turkey, Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Iran. It drains the south side of the Lesser Caucasus Mountains and then joins the Kura River, which drains the north side of Lesser Caucasus
Lesser Caucasus
Mountains. Its total length is 1,072 kilometres (666 mi), covering an area of 102,000 square kilometres (39,000 sq mi). The Aras River is one of the largest rivers in the Caucasus.Contents1 Names 2 Description 3 Etymology and history 4 Iğdır
Iğdır
Aras Valley Bird Paradise 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 FootnotesNames[edit] In the classical antiquity, the river was known to the Greeks as Araxes (Greek: Αράξης). Its modern Armenian name is Araks or Arax (Armenian: Արաքս). Historically it was also known as Yeraskh (Old Armenian: Երասխ), and its Old Georgian
Old Georgian
name is Rakhsi (რახსი). In Azerbaijani, the river name is Araz
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Dvin (ancient City)
Dvin (Classical Armenian: Դուին, reformed: Դվին; Greek: Δούβιος, Doύbios or Τίβιον, Tίbion;[1] Arabic: دبيل‎, translit. Dabīl or Doubil; also Duin or Dwin in ancient sources) was a large commercial city and the capital of early medieval Armenia. It was situated north of the previous ancient capital of Armenia, the city of Artaxata, along the banks of the Metsamor River, 35 km to the south of modern Yerevan. The site of the ancient city is currently not much more than a large hill located between modern Hnaberd (just off the main road through Hnaberd) and Verin Dvin, Armenia. Systematic excavations at Dvin that have proceeded since 1937 have produced an abundance of materials, which have shed light into the Armenian culture
Armenian culture
of the 5th to the 13th centuries.Contents1 Name 2 History 3 Cathedral of St
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Vakhtang I Of Iberia
Vakhtang (Georgian: ვახტანგ) is a masculine given name in Georgian language
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Cyril Toumanoff
Cyril Leo Heraclius, Prince Toumanoff (Russian: Кирилл Львович Туманов; 13 October 1913 – 4 February 1997) was a Russian-born American historian and genealogist who mostly specialized in the history and genealogies of medieval Georgia, Armenia, Iran
Iran
and the Byzantine Empire. His works have significantly influenced the Western scholarship of the medieval Caucasus.[1]Contents1 Family 2 Career 3 Bibliography 4 ReferencesFamily[edit] Cyril Toumanoff was born in Saint Petersburg
Saint Petersburg
into a family of the military officer of the Russian army
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Artashat (ancient City)
Artashat (Armenian: Արտաշատ); Hellenized as Artaxata
Artaxata
(Greek: Ἀρτάξατα), was a large commercial city and the capital of ancient Armenia
Armenia
during the reign of king Artaxias I; the founder of the Artaxiad Dynasty
Artaxiad Dynasty
of the ancient Kingdom of Armenia
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Transcaucasia
Transcaucasia
Transcaucasia
(Russian: Закавказье), or the South Caucasus, is a geographical region in the vicinity of the southern Caucasus Mountains on the border of Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
and Western Asia.[1][2] Transcaucasia
Transcaucasia
roughly corresponds to modern Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan
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Maku, Iran
Maku (Persian: ماكو‎, Azerbaijani: ماكي - Makı; also Romanized as Mākū)[1] is a city in the West Azerbaijan Province, Iran
Iran
& the capital of Maku County. At the 2006 census, its population was 41,865, in 10,428 families.[2] It is situated 22 kilometres (14 mi) from the Turkish border in a mountain gorge at an altitude of 1634 metres. The Zangmar River cuts through the city.[3][4] Maku Free Trade and Industrial Zone is Iran’s largest and the world’s second largest free trade zone and will encompass an area of 5000 square km when it was scheduled to open in 2011. Azerbaijanis and later Kurds constitute the population of the city.[5]Contents1 History 2 Climate 3 Population 4 Visa-free 5 Admission refused 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Maku was a region of the old Armenia
Armenia
c
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Kura (Caspian Sea)
The Kura (Turkish: Kura; Azerbaijani: Kür; Georgian: მტკვარი, Mt’k’vari; Armenian: Կուր, Kur; Ancient Greek: Κῦρος, Cyrus; Persian: کوروش‎, Kuruš [7][8]) is an east-flowing river south of the Greater Caucasus
Caucasus
Mountains which drains the southern slopes of the Greater Caucasus
Caucasus
east into the Caspian Sea. It also drains the north side of the Lesser Caucasus while its main tributary, the Aras drains the south side of those mountains. Starting in northeastern Turkey, it flows through Turkey
Turkey
to Georgia, then to Azerbaijan, where it receives the Aras as a right tributary, and enters the Caspian Sea
Caspian Sea
at Neftçala
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Tao (historical Region)
Tao (Georgian: ტაო) is a historical Georgian district and part of historic Tao-Klarjeti region, today part of the Eastern Anatolia region of Turkey. Its name derives from the ancient proto-Georgian inhabitants of this area, known as Taochi.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Antiquity 1.2 Middle Ages 1.3 Modern history2 See also 3 External links 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Antiquity[edit] The history of Tao could be traced to the emergence of the tribal confederation of Diauchi (Taochi, Tao) at 12–8th century BC.[2] Diauchi was engaged in war with the powerful kingdom of Urartu, and the inscriptions of the Urartu kings Menua (c. 810–786 BC) and Argishti (c. 786–764) reveal the wealth and power of this proto-Georgian kingdom.[3] In the 8th century BC, Diauchi was destroyed by the neighboring Colchis and Urartu and part of its territory was annexed by the Colchis. The region was bitterly contested by the Georgian and Armenian rulers throughout the following centuries
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Caucasian Albania
Albania, usually referred to as Caucasian Albania
Albania
for disambiguation with the modern state of Albania
Albania
(the endonym is unknown[4][5]), is a name for the historical region of the eastern Caucasus, that existed on the territory of present-day republic of Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
(where both of its capitals were located) and partially southern Dagestan. Around the first centuries BC and AD the land south of the Greater Caucasus
Caucasus
and north of the Lesser Caucasus
Caucasus
was divided between Kolchis
Kolchis
in the west, Caucasian Iberia
Caucasian Iberia
in the center and Caucasian Albania
Albania
in the east
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Taron (historic Armenia)
Taron (Armenian: Տարոն; Western Armenian
Western Armenian
pronunciation: Daron; Greek: Ταρών, Tarōn; Latin: Taraunitis) was a canton of the Turuberan
Turuberan
province of Greater Armenia, roughly corresponding to the Muş Province
Muş Province
of modern Turkey.[1] Early Middle Ages[edit] The main source on the principality's history during the Early Middle Ages is the History of Taron, a relatively short "historical" romance in five parts, purporting to describe significant events occurring in the district of Taron during the Byzantine–Sassanid Wars
Byzantine–Sassanid Wars
when the Sassanid emperor was Khosrau II
Khosrau II
(590-628). During Khosrau's reign, Taron was frequently invaded by the Persians. The History describes the actions of five generations of Mamikonians (Taron's princely house), in defending and avenging the district
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Peroz I
Peroz I
Peroz I
(Middle Persian: ; New Persian: پیروز Pirouz, lit. "the Victor") was the eighteenth king of the Sasanian Empire, who ruled from 459 to 484. Peroz I
Peroz I
was the eldest son of Yazdegerd II (438–457).Contents1 Rise to power 2 Reign2.1 Aftermath of the civil war 2.2 Seven-year famine (464-471) 2.3 War with the Kidarites 2.4 First war with the Hephthalites 2.5 Second war with the Hephthalites 2.6 Trouble in Armenia 2.7 Third war with the Hephthalites
Hephthalites
and death3 In Persian literature 4 References 5 SourcesRise to power[edit] On the death of Peroz I's father, Yazdegerd II, the younger son of the deceased emperor, Hormizd, seized the throne in the absence of his elder brother Peroz who had been posted as the governor of distant Sistan; Peroz was thus forced to seek the protection of the Hephthalites
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Hephthalites
The Hephthalites (or Ephthalites) were a people of Central Asia who were militarily important circa 450–560. They were based in Bactria and expanded east to the Tarim Basin, west to Sogdia
Sogdia
and south through Afghanistan
Afghanistan
to northern India. They were a tribal confederation and included both nomadic and settled urban communities. They were part of the four major "Hunic" states known collectively as Xionites
Xionites
or "Hunas", being preceded by the Kidarites, and succeeded by the Alchon Huns
Huns
and lastly the Nezak Huns. The Sveta Huna or White Huns
Huns
who invaded northern India
India
are probably the Hephthalites, but the exact relation is not clear. The stronghold of the Hephthalites was Tokharistan on the northern slopes of the Hindu Kush, in what is present-day northeastern Afghanistan
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Vagharshapat
Coordinates: 40°10′22″N 44°17′33″E / 40.17278°N 44.29250°E / 40.17278; 44.29250Vagharshapat ՎաղարշապատAerial view of Ejmiatsin and the Mother See complexFlagSealVagharshapatCoordinates: 40°10′22″N 44°17′33″E / 40.17278°N 44.29250°E / 40.17278; 44.29250Country ArmeniaMarz (Province) ArmavirFounded 685 BCGovernment • Mayor Karen GrigoryanArea • Total 40 km2 (20 sq mi)Elevation 853 m (2,799 ft)Population (2011 census) • Total 46,540 • Density 1,200/km2 (3,000/sq mi)Time zone   (UTC+4)Area code(s) 0231Website www.ejmiatsin.amSources: Population[1] Vagharshapat
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