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VCD
VIDEO CD (abbreviated as VCD, and also known as COMPACT DISC DIGITAL VIDEO) is a home video format and the first format for distributing films on standard 120 mm (4.7 in) optical discs. The format was widely adopted in Southeast Asia
Southeast Asia
instead of VHS
VHS
and Betamax
Betamax
systems. The format is a standard digital format for storing video on a compact disc . VCDs are playable in dedicated VCD players, most DVD and Blu-ray Disc
Blu-ray Disc
players, personal computers , and some video game consoles . The Video
Video
CD standard was created in 1993 by Sony
Sony
, Philips
Philips
, Matsushita , and JVC
JVC
and is referred to as the White Book standard. Although they have been superseded by other media, VCDs continue to be retailed as a low-cost video format
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International Standard
INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS are standards developed by international standards organizations . International standards are available for consideration and use worldwide. The most prominent organization is the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO). CONTENTS * 1 Purpose * 2 History * 2.1 Standardization * 2.2 International organizations * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links PURPOSEInternational standards may be used either by direct application or by a process of modifying an international standard to suit local conditions
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Philips
KONINKLIJKE PHILIPS N.V. (KONINKLIJKE PHILIPS N.V. OF THE NETHERLAND, PHILIPS), (stylized as PHILIPS) is a Dutch technology company headquartered in Amsterdam
Amsterdam
with primary divisions focused in the areas of electronics, healthcare and lighting. It was founded in Eindhoven in 1891, by Gerard Philips and his father Frederik. It is one of the largest electronics companies in the world and employs around 105,000 people across more than 60 countries. Philips
Philips
is organized into three main divisions: Philips
Philips
Consumer Lifestyle (formerly Philips
Philips
Consumer Electronics and Philips
Philips
Domestic Appliances and Personal Care), Philips
Philips
Healthcare
Healthcare
(formerly Philips Medical Systems) and Philips
Philips
Lighting
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Sony
SONY CORPORATION (ソニー株式会社, Sonī Kabushiki Kaisha
Kabushiki Kaisha
, /ˈsoʊni/ SOH-nee , stylized as SONY) is a Japanese multinational conglomerate corporation headquartered in Kōnan, Minato, Tokyo . Its diversified business includes consumer and professional electronics , gaming , entertainment and financial services . The company is one of the leading manufacturers of electronic products for the consumer and professional markets. Sony
Sony
was ranked 105th on the 2017 list of Fortune Global 500
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JVC
VICTOR COMPANY OF JAPAN, LTD (日本ビクター株式会社, Nippon Bikutā Kabushiki-gaisha), TYO : 6792, usually referred to as JVC
JVC
or THE JAPAN VICTOR COMPANY, is a Japanese international professional and consumer electronics corporation based in Yokohama
Yokohama
. Founded in 1927, the company is best known for introducing Japan's first televisions and for developing the Video
Video
Home System ( VHS
VHS
) video recorder. From 1953 to 2008, Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. was the majority stockholder in JVC. In 2008, JVC
JVC
merged with Kenwood Corporation
Corporation
to create JVC Kenwood Holdings
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Megabytes
The MEGABYTE is a multiple of the unit byte for digital information. Its recommended unit symbol is MB. The unit prefix mega is a multiplier of 1000000 (106) in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI). Therefore, one megabyte is one million bytes of information. This definition has been incorporated into the International System of Quantities . However, in the computer and information technology fields, several other definitions are used that arose for historical reasons of convenience. A common usage has been to designate one megabyte as 1048576bytes (220 B), a measurement that conveniently expresses the binary multiples inherent in digital computer memory architectures. However, most standards bodies have deprecated this usage in favor of a set of binary prefixes , in which this quantity is designated by the unit mebibyte (MiB). Less common is a convention that used the megabyte to mean 1000×1024 (1024000) bytes
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Panasonic
PANASONIC CORPORATION (パナソニック株式会社, Panasonikku Kabushiki-gaisha), formerly known as MATSUSHITA ELECTRIC INDUSTRIAL CO., LTD. (松下電器産業株式会社, Matsushita Denki Sangyō Kabushiki-gaisha), is a Japanese multinational electronics corporation headquartered in Kadoma , Osaka
Osaka
, Japan
Japan
. The company was founded in 1918 as a producer of lightbulb sockets and has grown to become one of the largest Japanese electronics producers alongside Sony
Sony
, Hitachi , Toshiba
Toshiba
and Canon Inc. . In addition to electronics, it offers non-electronic products and services such as home renovation services. PANASONIC is the world\'s fourth-largest television manufacturer by 2012 market share
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Videodisc
VIDEODISC (or VIDEO DISC) is a general term for a laser - or stylus -readable random-access disc that contains both audio and analog video signals recorded in an analog form. Typically, it is a reference to any such media that predates the mainstream popularity of the DVD format. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Classification * 3 See also * 4 References * 4.1 Notes * 4.2 Bibliography * 5 External links HISTORYE however, it was abandoned in favor of VHS
VHS
by its parent company. In Japan, the TOSBAC computer was using digital video disks to display color pictures at 256x256 image resolution in 1972. In 1973, Hitachi
Hitachi
announced a video disc capable of recording 15-colour still images on a disc. The same year, Sony
Sony
announced a video disc recorder, similar to the Sony
Sony
Mavica format
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Content Format
A CONTENT FORMAT is an encoded format for converting a specific type of data to displayable information . Content formats are used in recording and transmission to prepare data for observation or interpretation . This includes both analog and digitized content. Content formats may be recorded and read by either natural or manufactured tools and mechanisms. In addition to converting data to information, a content format may include the encryption and/or scrambling of that information. Multiple content formats may be contained within a single section of a storage medium (e.g. track , disk sector , computer file , document , page , column ) or transmitted via a single channel (e.g. wire , carrier wave ) of a transmission medium . With multimedia , multiple tracks containing multiple content formats are presented simultaneously
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Optical Disc
In computing and optical disc recording technologies , an OPTICAL DISC (OD) is a flat, usually circular disc which encodes binary data (bits ) in the form of pits (binary value of 0 or off, due to lack of reflection when read) and lands (binary value of 1 or on, due to a reflection when read) on a special material (often aluminium ) on one of its flat surfaces. The encoding material sits atop a thicker substrate (usually polycarbonate ) which makes up the bulk of the disc and forms a dust defocusing layer. The encoding pattern follows a continuous, spiral path covering the entire disc surface and extending from the innermost track to the outermost track
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Optical Disc Authoring
OPTICAL DISC AUTHORING, including DVD
DVD
and Blu-ray Disc authoring is the process of assembling source material—video, audio or other data—into the proper logical volume format to then be recorded ("burned") onto an optical disc (typically a compact disc or DVD
DVD
). CONTENTS * 1 Process * 2 Sessions * 2.1 Tracks * 3 Hardware * 4 Software * 5 File
File
systems * 5.1 ISO 9660 * 5.2 Universal Disk Format * 6 HighMAT * 7 See also * 8 External links PROCESSTo burn an optical disc, one usually first creates an optical disc image with a full file system , of a type designed for the optical disc, in temporary storage such as a file in another file system on a disk drive. Then, one copies the image to the disc
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DVD-R DS
DVD-R DS (DS stand for Double Side) is also called DVD-10 (Dual Side, Single Layer) or DVD-18 (Dual Side, Dual Layer), it is a sub category of DVD-R. A DVD-R DS has a storage capacity of 8.75 GB (DVD-10) or 15.9 GB(DVD-18)
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DVD+R DS
DVD
DVD
RECORDABLE and DVD
DVD
REWRITABLE refer to part of optical disc recording technologies . DVD
DVD
optical disc formats that can be recorded by a DVD
DVD
recorder , (written, "burned"), either write once or rewritable (write multiple times) format written by laser , as compared to DVD-ROM , which is mass-produced by pressing, primarily for the distribution of home video . DVD
DVD
recordable is a general term that refers to both write-once and rewritable formats, whereas DVD rewritable refers only to rewritable formats. Like CD-Rs , DVD
DVD
recordables use dyes. Depending on the intensity of the laser, the reflective property of the dye on a particular spot will determine whether it is a peak or a valley representation from pressed DVD. Dyes give the data side of a disc a distinct color
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Green Book (CD Standard)
The "GREEN BOOK", formally known as the "CD-I FULL FUNCTIONAL SPECIFICATION", is a CD standard developed in 1986 by Philips
Philips
and Sony that defines the format for interactive, multimedia compact discs designed for CD-i players. The standard was originally not freely available and had to be licensed from Philips. However, the 1994 version of the standard was eventually made available free by Philips. CD-i discs conform to the Red Book specification of audio CDs (CD-DA). Tracks on a CD-i's program area can be CD-DA tracks or CD-i tracks, but the first track must always be a CD-i track, and all CD-i tracks must be grouped together at the beginning of the area. CD-i tracks are structured according to the CD-ROM XA specification (using either Mode 2 Form 1 or Mode 2 Form 2 modes), and have different classes depending on their contents ("data", "video", "audio", "empty" and "message")
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DVD+RW
DVD
DVD
RECORDABLE and DVD
DVD
REWRITABLE refer to part of optical disc recording technologies . DVD
DVD
optical disc formats that can be recorded by a DVD
DVD
recorder , (written, "burned"), either write once or rewritable (write multiple times) format written by laser , as compared to DVD-ROM , which is mass-produced by pressing, primarily for the distribution of home video . DVD
DVD
recordable is a general term that refers to both write-once and rewritable formats, whereas DVD rewritable refers only to rewritable formats. Like CD-Rs , DVD
DVD
recordables use dyes. Depending on the intensity of the laser, the reflective property of the dye on a particular spot will determine whether it is a peak or a valley representation from pressed DVD. Dyes give the data side of a disc a distinct color
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5.1 Music Disc
The DTS MUSIC DISC (official name), DTS AUDIO CD or 5.1 MUSIC DISC is an audio Compact Disc
Compact Disc
that contains music in one of various possible surround sound configurations. The specification permits discrete channel configurations from 2.0 (L, R) to 6.1 (L, R, C, LFE, Ls, Rs, Cs), although 5.1 (L, R, C, LFE, Ls, Rs) is the most common. Physically, a DTS Music Disc conforms to the Red Book standard; however a DTS bitstream, based on the Coherent Acoustics compression algorithm, is actually encapsulated in each PCM audio track. This configuration permits any non-DTS enabled player to output multi-channel audio when connected to an external DTS-compliant processor (e.g. a typical AV receiver) via a digital interface like S/PDIF or HDMI, provided that the player does not modify the bitstream internally
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