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Uwabaki
Uwabaki
Uwabaki
(上履き) are a type of Japanese slippers worn indoors at home, school or certain companies and public buildings where street shoes are prohibited. Japanese culture mandates that people should remove their shoes when entering homes and other buildings, especially where the floors may have rugs, polished wood floors, or tatami (grass mats). Uwabaki
Uwabaki
are light, flexible shoes which are easy to slip on and off, designated for indoor use. As they are not generally worn outside, the soles are kept clean, and thus cleaning and maintenance of the building's floors are kept to a minimum. At the entrance of every school, from preschool to college, there is a genkan with an assigned locker (getabako) for each student to put his or her uwabaki
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Uwa-obi
Uwa-obi
Uwa-obi
(上帯[1]) a type of belt/sash that was worn by the samurai class and their retainers in feudal Japan. The uwa-obi was used to attach the sageo (saya cord) of the sword or swords worn by a samurai in order to secure it, other weapons and equipment would be tied to the uwa-obi as well. The uwa-obi was made from linen and cloth made of cotton, it would be wound two to three times around the body when worn. When the uwa-obi was worn with the attire or armour of the samurai, it would first be folded in two, then twisted and then a piece of leather was placed within the centre. This method was used to find the middle of the uwa-obi in a dark area
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Preschool
A preschool, also known as nursery school, pre-primary school, playschool or kindergarten, is an educational establishment or learning space offering early childhood education to children before they begin compulsory education at primary school. It may be publicly or privately operated, and may be subsidized from public funds.Contents1 Terminology 2 History2.1 Origins 2.2 Spread3 Developmental areas 4 Funding 5 Advocacy 6 Curricula 7 National variations7.1 China 7.2 Turkey 7.3 Japan 7.4 North Korea 7.5 United States7.5.1 Head Start7.6 United Kingdom7.6.1 England 7.6.2 Wales 7.6.3 Northern Ireland 7.6.4 Scotland7.7 Ireland8 See also 9 References 10 Sources 11 Further reading 12 External linksTerminology[edit] Terminology varies by country
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Locker (cabinet)
A locker is a small, usually narrow storage compartment. They are commonly found in dedicated cabinets, very often in large numbers, in various public places such as locker rooms, workplaces, middle and high schools, transport hub and the like. They vary in size, purpose, construction, and security.Contents1 General description and characteristics 2 Variable characteristics of lockers 3 Types and applications 4 Doorless designs 5 Abolition of lockers 6 References 7 External linksGeneral description and characteristics[edit] Lockers are normally quite narrow, of varying heights and tier arrangements. Width and depth usually conform to standard measurements, although non-standard sizes are occasionally found. Public places with lockers often contain large numbers of them, such as in a school
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Getabako
A getabako (下駄箱) is a shoe cupboard in Japan, usually situated in the genkan, an entryway or porch of the house. In Japan, it is considered uncouth to not remove one's shoes before entering the house.[1][2] Near the getabako is a slipper rack,[3] and most people in Japan
Japan
wear slippers around the house, except for rooms which have tatami flooring as they are bad for the floor. The getabako is usually made of wood and bamboo, and there are many sold all over the world. The word getabako is originated from 下駄 (geta – a Japanese clog) + 箱 (hako – box).[4] Usually there are big getabako in schools and kindergartens, and each student has his own section. Sometimes students store personal things there, or use them to leave love letters.[1][5][6] See also[edit]LockerReferences[edit] Getabako
Getabako
at an elementary school^ a b Removing Shoes // Japanese Culture and Daily Life, The Japan Forum
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Tatami
A tatami (畳) is a type of mat used as a flooring material in traditional Japanese-style rooms. Traditionally made using rice straw to form the core, the cores of contemporary tatami are sometimes composed of compressed wood chip boards or polystyrene foam. With a covering of woven soft rush (igusa 藺草) straw, tatami are made in standard sizes, with the length exactly twice the width, an aspect ratio of 2:1. Usually, on the long sides, they have edging (heri 縁) of brocade or plain cloth, although some tatami have no edging.[1]Contents1 History 2 Size 3 Layout 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]Men making tatami mats, late 19th century.The term tatami is derived from the verb tatamu, meaning to fold or pile. This indicates that the early tatami were thin and could be folded up when not used or piled in layers.[2] Tatami
Tatami
were originally a luxury item for the nobility
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Netsuke
Netsuke
Netsuke
(根付) [netsɯke] are miniature sculptures that were invented in 17th-century Japan
Japan
to serve a practical function (the two Japanese characters ne+tsuke mean "root" and "to attach"). In English the word may be italicized or not, with American English
American English
tending to favour the former and British English
British English
the latter.[1][2] Traditional Japanese garments—robes called kosode and kimono—had no pockets; however, men who wore them needed a place to store their personal belongings, such as pipes, tobacco, money, seals, or medicines. Their solution was to place such objects in containers (called sagemono) hung by cords from the robes' sashes (obi). The containers may have been pouches or small woven baskets, but the most popular were beautifully crafted boxes (inrō), which were held shut by ojime, which were sliding beads on cords
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Keikogi
Keikogi
Keikogi
(稽古着 or 稽古衣) or dōgi (道着) is a uniform for training, used in martial arts derived from Japan, or budō. (Keiko means practice, gi means dress or clothes.) The prototype for the modern keikogi emerged in the late 19th century. The keikogi was developed by judo founder Kanō Jigorō.[1] Japanese martial arts historian Dave Lowry
Dave Lowry
speculates Kanō derived the uniform's design from the uniforms of Japanese firefighters' heavy hemp jackets called "hanten".[1] By 1920, the keikogi as it exists today was worn by Kanō's students for judo practice. The Kodokan (judo headquarters) has a photo taken in 1920 that shows Kanō wearing a modern keikogi.[2]These two judoka are wearing judogiUntil the 1920s, Okinawan karate practice was usually performed in everyday clothes
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Genkan
Genkan
Genkan
(玄関) are traditional Japanese entryway areas for a house, apartment, or building—something of a combination of a porch and a doormat.[1] It is usually located inside the building directly in front of the door. The primary function of genkan is for the removal of shoes before entering the main part of the house or building. A secondary function is a place for brief visits without being invited across the genkan step into the house proper.[2] For example, where a pizza delivery driver in an English-speaking country would normally stand on the porch and conduct business through the open front door, in Japan
Japan
a food delivery would typically take place across the genkan step.[3] Genkan
Genkan
are normally recessed into the floor, to contain any dirt that is tracked in from the outside (as in a mud room)
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Slippers
Slippers are light footwear that are easy to put on and off and are intended to be worn indoors, particularly at home.[1]Contents1 History 2 Types 3 In popular culture 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The recorded history of slippers can be traced back to the 12th century when the Vietnamese had been wearing slippers. But in the West, the record only can be traced to 1478.[2] The historical record of slippers in the west is about in Sultan when people wear them indoors to slip.[3] Types[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Kanzashi
Kanzashi
Kanzashi
(簪) are hair ornaments used in traditional Japanese hairstyles. Some models may have been modified for self-defense.[1] In the English-speaking world, the term "kanzashi" is sometimes applied to the folded cloth flowers that traditionally adorned tsumami kanzashi or to the technique used to make those flowers.Contents1 History 2 General types2.1 Basic kanzashi shapes 2.2 Hana kanzashi 2.3 Seasonal
Seasonal
kanzashi3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Kanzashi
Kanzashi
were first used in Japan during the Jōmon period. During that time, a single thin rod or stick was considered to have mystical powers which could ward off evil spirits, so people would wear them in their hair
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Kasa (hat)
A kasa (笠) is any one of several sorts of traditional Japanese hats.[1] Some types are amigasa, jingasa, sandogasa, sugegasa, and takuhatsugasa. Note that rendaku ("sequential voicing") causes kasa to change to gasa when it is preceded by another word specifying the type of hat: thus, jingasa ("camp hat"; helmet). An amigasa is a straw hat of the type traditionally worn in some Japanese folk dances. Another kind of kasa, the woven rice-straw takuhatsugasa worn by mendicant Buddhist monks, is made overlarge and in a bowl or mushroom shape. Unlike a rice farmer's hat, it does not come to a point, nor does it ride high on the head like a samurai's traveling hat
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Tokin (headwear)
A tokin (頭襟 or 頭巾 or ときん) is a small black box worn on the foreheads of Yamabushi
Yamabushi
– practitioners of Shugendō
Shugendō
– or Tengu, dangerous yet protective spirits of the mountains and forests from the Japanese mythology. It is not only worn as a head decoration, but also used as a drinking cup
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Tsunokakushi
Tsunokakushi
Tsunokakushi
(角隠し) is a traditional headwear worn in Shinto wedding ceremonies in Japan. Tsunokakushi
Tsunokakushi
is a rectangular piece of cloth, which covers the bridal high topknot called Bunkin Takashimada (文金高島田 bunkin takashimada), a kind of Mage (髷 mage), Japanese traditional topknot. It's often made of white silk. This is traditionally worn to veil the bride's horns of jealousy, ego and selfishness. It also symbolizes the bride's resolve to become a gentle and obedient wife.[1][2] See also[edit]Bunkin Takashimada (ja 日本語) Mage (ja 日本語)References[edit]^ Buckley, Sandra (2002). Encyclopedia of contemporary Japanese culture. Taylor & Francis. pp. 560–561. ISBN 978-0-415-14344-8.  ^ Jeremy, Michael; Michael Ernest Robinson (1989). Ceremony and symbolism in the Japanese home. Manchester University Press ND. p. 116
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