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Uttānāsana
Uttanasana
Uttanasana
(/uːtəˈnɑːsənɑː/ OO-tə-NAH-sə-nah)[1] (Sanskrit: उत्तानासन; IAST: uttānāsana), Intense Forward-Bending Pose,[2] Intense Stretch Pose,[3] Standing Forward Bend,[4][5][6][7][8][9][10] Standing Forward Fold Pose,[11][12] or Standing Head to Knees Pose[1] is an asana.Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 Murghasana 4 Anatomical focus 5 Contraindications and cautions 6 Alternative asana 7 Variations7.1 Padahastasana8 See also 9 Further reading 10 External links 11 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The name comes from the Sanskrit words Ud (उद्; ud) = p
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Brahmic Scripts
Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
32 c. BCE Hieratic
Hieratic
32 c. BCEDemotic 7 c. BCEMeroitic 3 c. BCEProto-Sinaitic 19 c. BCEUgaritic 15 c. BCE Epigraphic South Arabian 9 c. BCEGe’ez 5–6 c. BCEPhoenician 12 c. BCEPaleo-Hebrew 10 c. BCESamaritan 6 c. BCE Libyco-Berber
Libyco-Berber
3 c. BCETifinaghPaleohispanic (semi-syllabic) 7 c. BCE Aramaic 8 c. BCE Kharoṣṭhī
Kharoṣṭhī
4 c. BCE Brāhmī 4 c. BCE Brahmic family
Brahmic family
(see)E.g. Tibetan 7 c. CE Devanagari
Devanagari
13 c. CECanadian syllabics 1840Hebrew 3 c. BCE Pahlavi 3 c. BCEAvestan 4 c. CEPalmyrene 2 c. BCE Syriac 2 c. BCENabataean 2 c. BCEArabic 4 c. CEN'Ko 1949 CESogdian 2 c. BCEOrkhon (old Turkic) 6 c. CEOld Hungarian c. 650 CEOld UyghurMongolian 1204 CEMandaic 2 c. CEGreek 8 c. BCEEtruscan 8 c. BCELatin 7 c
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Bharadvajasana
Spine - twist side: Internal obliques, erector spinae, splenius capitis Other side: External obliques, rotatores, multifidi sternocleidomastoidUsageLocation in Ashtanga Vinyasa series2nd series:before forward bends. before headstands.This article contains Indic text
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Aekpaadprasarnaasana
A lunge can refer to any position of the human body where one leg is positioned forward with knee bent and foot flat on the ground while the other leg is positioned behind.[1][2][3] It is used by athletes in cross-training for sports, by weight-trainers as a fitness exercise, and by yogis as part of an asana regimen. In difference to the Split squat exercise, during the lunge the rear leg is also activated.[4]Contents1 Strength training 2 Yoga 3 See also 4 ReferencesStrength training[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Anantāsana
thumb250px Anantāsana
Anantāsana
/ अनन्तासन / Posture of Anantainfinity-pose- variation with both legs lifted and not grabbing onto the big toeAnantasana (Sanskrit: अनन्तासन; IAST: Anantāsana), Vishnu's Couch Pose,[1] Eternal One's Pose, or Side-Reclining Leg Lift[2] is an asana.Contents1 Etymology 2 Benefits 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The name comes from the Sanskrit words anantā (अनन्त) meaning "without end" or "the infinite one", derived from the name of the thousand-headed
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Anjaneyasana
Anjaneyāsana is an asana. The name Anjaneya is a matronymic for Hanuman
Hanuman
whose mother's name is Anjani. Hanuman
Hanuman
is a central figure in the epic Rāmāyaṇa
Rāmāyaṇa
and an important Iṣṭa-devatā
Iṣṭa-devatā
in devotional worship. The name crescent pose is typically used in English
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Half Lord Of The Fishes Pose - Ardha Matsyendrāsana
Ardha Matsyendrasana (Sanskrit: अर्धमत्स्येन्द्रासन; IAST: Ardha Matsyendrāsana), Half Lord of the Fishes Pose,[1] Half Spinal Twist Pose[2] or Vakrasana[3] is an asana. The asana usually appears as a seated spinal twist with many variations, and is one of the twelve basic asanas in many systems of Hatha Yoga.[4]Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 Variations3.1 Ardha Matsyendrasana I 3.2 Ardha Matsyendrasana III4 Benefits 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The asana is named after the great yogi Matsyendranath.[5] The name comes from the Sanskrit words ardha meaning "half", matsya meaning "fish", eendra meaning "king", and asana (आसन ) meaning "posture" or "seat".[6] The name Vakrasana comes from the Sanskrit word→ "Vakra" ('twisted').[3] Description[edit] One foot is placed flat on the floor outside the opposite leg and torso twists toward the top leg
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Ākarṇa Dhanurāsana
Akarna Dhanurasana (Sanskrit: आकर्ण धनुरासन; IAST: Ākarṇa Dhanurāsana) is an asana.Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 Benefits 4 See also 5 Further reading 6 References 7 External linksEtymology[edit] Ākarṇa Dhanurāsana in translation from Sanskrit Karṇa means ear and the prefix Ā means towards; or near. Dhanu means "bow" and asana means "pose", the name literally translated is towards the ear bow pose. An easier to remember, non literal translation is the "Archer Pose," as the position resembles an archer about to release an arrow. Description[edit] This asana involves pulling the foot towards the ear
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Handstand
A handstand is the act of supporting the body in a stable, inverted vertical position by balancing on the hands. In a basic handstand the body is held straight with arms and legs fully extended, with hands spaced approximately shoulder-width apart. There are many variations of handstands, but in all cases a handstand performer must possess adequate balance and upper body strength. Handstands are performed in many athletic activities, including acro dance, cheerleading, circus, yoga, and gymnastics. Some variation of handstand is performed on every gymnastic apparatus, and many tumbling skills pass through a handstand position during their execution. Breakdancers incorporate handstands in freezes and kicks. Armstand dives—a category found in competitive platform diving—are dives that begin with a handstand. In games or contests, swimmers perform underwater handstands with their legs and feet extended above the water. Handstands are known by various other names
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Baddha Koṇāsana
Baddha Konasana (/ˈbɑːdɑː koʊˈnɑːsɑːnɑː/ BAH-dah koh-NAH-sah-nah;[1] Sanskrit: बद्धकोणासन; IAST: baddhakoṇāsana), Bound Angle Pose,[2] or Cobbler Pose (after the typical sitting position of Indian cobblers when they work)[3] is an asana.Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 Benefits 4 Precautions 5 Variations 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksEtymology[edit] The name comes from the Sanskrit words baddha (बद्ध, baddha) meaning "bound", kona (कोण, koṇa) meaning "angle" or "split",[4] and Asana
Asana
(आसन, Āsana) meaning "posture" or "seat".[5] Description[edit] From sitting position with both the legs outstretched forward, hands by the sides, palms resting on the ground, fingers together pointing forward, the legs are hinged at the knees so the soles of the feet meet. The legs are grasped at the ankles and folded more until the heels reach the perineum
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Bakasana
Bakāsana (Sanskrit: बकासन, Crane Pose), often used interchangeably with Kakasana (Sanskrit: काकासन, Crow Pose) is an asana.[1] In all variations, Crane/Crow is an arm balancing asana in which hands are planted on the floor, shins rest upon upper arms, and feet lift up.[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 Benefits 4 Variations 5 Follow-up asanas 6 Gallery 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksEtymology[edit] The two names for the asana come from the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
words baka ("crane") or kak ("crow"), and asana (आसन) meaning "posture" or "seat".[3][4]
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Bālāsana
Bālāsana
Bālāsana
(Sanskrit: बालासन), Child's Pose,[1] or Child's Resting Pose is an asana. Balasana is a counter asana for various asanas and is usually practiced before and after Sirsasana.[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The name comes from the Sanskrit words bala meaning "child" and asana (आसन) meaning "posture" or "seat".[3] Description[edit] In this asana, the body faces the floor in a fetal position. The knees and hips are bent with the shins on the floor. The chest can rest either on the knees or the knees can be spread to about the width of a yoga mat, allowing the chest to go between the knees. The head is stretched forward towards the ground - the forehead may touch the ground
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Navasana
Naukasana ("Boat Pose") is a seated yoga asana. Variations include Paripurna Navasana
Navasana
(Sanskrit: परिपूर्णनावासन; IAST: paripūrṇanāvāsana "Full Boat Pose"),[1] Ardha Navāsana (Sanskrit: अर्धनावासन "Half Boat Pose"),[2] and ekapadanavasana ("one legged boat pose").Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 Benefits 4 Variations 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The name comes from the Sanskrit words nava meaning "boat" and asana (आसन) meaning "posture" or "seat".[3][4] In its literal translation, "Boat Pose", the body could be imagined to resemble a boat, entirely balanced on the buttocks. Description[edit] The body comes into a V-shape, balancing entirely on the buttocks. In different variations and traditions, the arms legs and torso may take different positions
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Bhujangasana
Bhujangasana
Bhujangasana
(Sanskrit pronunciation: [bʱʊ.ɟ͡ʝəŋ.gɑːsə.nə];[1] Sanskrit: भुजङ्गासन; IAST: Bhujaṅgāsana) or Cobra Pose[2] is a back-bending yoga asana[3].Contents1 Etymology 2 Benefits 3 Cautions 4 Follow-up asanas 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The name comes from the Sanskrit words bhujanga meaning "snake" or "serpent" and asana (आसन) meaning "posture" or "seat".From a prone position with palms and legs on the floor, the chest is lifted. This asana resembles a serpent with its hood raised. Cobra Pose or Bhujangasana
Bhujangasana
is part of the sequence of yoga postures in Padma Sadhana and Surya Namaskar
Surya Namaskar
or Sun Salutation. Bhujangasana
Bhujangasana
is pronounced as BHU-jung-AAHS-uh-nuh
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Bhujapidasana
Bhujapidasana
Bhujapidasana
(Sanskrit: भुजपीडासन; IAST: Bhujapīḍāsana) or Shoulder pressing posture[1] is a Yoga
Yoga
asana.[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 See also 4 References 5 SourcesEtymology[edit] The name of this asana comes from Bhuja (Sanskrit: भुज) meaning "arm" or "shoulder", Pīḍa (Sanskrit: पीडा) meaning "pressure" [2] and Asana
Asana
(Sanskrit: आसन) meaning "posture".[3] Description[edit] Bhujapidasana
Bhujapidasana
is an arm supported asana in which the base of support are the palms of the hands. It requires both balance and strength to maintain. See also[edit] Yoga
Yoga
portalMālāsanaReferences[edit]^ " Yoga
Yoga
Journal - Shoulder-pressing posture". Retrieved 2012-12-07.  ^ a b Iyengar, B.K.S (1979). Light on Yoga. New York: Schocken. pp. 280–2
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