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Utsunomiya Domain
Utsunomiya Domain
Utsunomiya Domain
(宇都宮藩, Utsunomiya-han) was a feudal domain under the Tokugawa shogunate
Tokugawa shogunate
of Edo period
Edo period
Japan, located in Shimotsuke Province
Shimotsuke Province
(modern-day Tochigi Prefecture), Japan. It was centered on Utsunomiya Castle
Utsunomiya Castle
in what is now part of the city of Utsunomiya. Utsunomiya was ruled by numerous daimyo clans during its history.Contents1 History 2 Holdings at the end of the Edo period 3 List of daimyōs 4 References 5 External links 6 NotesHistory[edit] Utsunomiya has been ruled by the Utsunomiya clan, one of the eight major samurai bands of the northern Kantō region
Kantō region
and a cadet branch of the Fujiwara clan since the Kamakura period
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Han (Japan)
The han (藩, han) or domain is the Japanese historical term for the estate of a warrior after the 12th century or of a daimyō in the Edo period (1603–1868) and early Meiji period
Meiji period
(1868–1912).[1]Contents1 History 2 Edo period 3 Meiji period 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] In the Sengoku period
Sengoku period
(1467 – 1603), Toyotomi Hideyoshi
Toyotomi Hideyoshi
caused a transformation of the han system. The feudal system based on land became an abstraction based on periodic cadastral surveys and projected agricultural yields.[2] In Japan, a feudal domain was defined in terms of projected annual income. This was different from the feudalism of the West
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Tango Province
Tango Province (丹後国, Tango no Kuni) was an old province in the area that is today northern Kyoto Prefecture
Kyoto Prefecture
facing the Sea of Japan.[1] Together with Tanba Province, Tango was sometimes called Tanshū (丹州). Tango bordered on Tajima, Tanba, and Wakasa provinces. At various times both Maizuru
Maizuru
and Miyazu were the capital and chief town of the province.Contents1 History 2 Historical districts 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] In the 3rd month of the 6th year of the Wadō era (713), the land of Tango Province was administratively separated from Tanba Province
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Castle Town
A castle town is a settlement built adjacent to or surrounding a castle. Castle
Castle
towns were common in Medieval
Medieval
Europe. Some examples include small towns like Alnwick
Alnwick
and Arundel, which are still dominated by their castles. In Western Europe, and England particularly, it is common for cities and towns that were not castle towns to instead have been organized around cathedrals. Towns organized around Japanese castles are called jōkamachi (城下町). See also[edit]Castles and Town Walls of King Edward in Gwynedd JōkamachiThis architecture-related article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis military base or fortification article is a stub
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Nikkō Tōshō-gū
Nikkō Tōshō-gū
Tōshō-gū
(日光東照宮) is a Tōshō-gū
Tōshō-gū
Shinto shrine located in Nikkō, Tochigi
Nikkō, Tochigi
Prefecture, Japan. Together with Futarasan Shrine
Futarasan Shrine
and Rinnō-ji, it forms the Shrines and Temples of Nikkō UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site, with 42 structures of the shrine included in the nomination. Five of them are designated as National Treasures of Japan, and three more as Important Cultural Properties.Contents1 History 2 Gallery 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Tōshō-gū
Tōshō-gū
is dedicated to Tokugawa Ieyasu, the founder of the Tokugawa shogunate. It was initially built in 1617, during the Edo period, while Ieyasu's son Hidetada was shōgun.[1] It was enlarged during the time of the third shogun, Iemitsu
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Kubota Domain
Kubota Domain
Kubota Domain
(久保田藩, Kubota han) was a feudal domain in Edo period Japan, located in Dewa Province
Dewa Province
(modern-day Akita Prefecture), Japan. It was centered on Kubota Castle
Kubota Castle
in what is now the city of Akita and was thus also known as the Akita Domain (秋田藩, Akita han). It was governed for the whole of its history by the Satake clan. During its rule over Kubota, the Satake clan
Satake clan
was ranked as a Province-holding daimyō (国持ち大名, kunimochi daimyō) family, and as such, had the privilege of shogunal audiences in the Great Hall (Ohiroma) of Edo Castle.[1] In the Boshin War
Boshin War
of 1868–69, the domain joined the Ōuetsu Reppan Dōmei, the alliance of northern domains supporting the Tokugawa shogunate, but then later defected to the imperial side
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Junshi
Junshi
Junshi
(殉死) (following the lord in death, sometimes translated as "suicide through fidelity") refers to the medieval Japanese act of vassals committing seppuku (a voluntary suicide) for the death of their lord. Originally it was only performed when the lord was slain in battle or murdered.Contents1 Background 2 Examples 3 See also 4 ReferencesBackground[edit] The practice is described by Chinese chronicles, describing the Yamato people (the Japanese), going as far back as the 7th century. According to the Weizhi (Chronicle of Wei), a decree in 646 forbade junshi, but it obviously continued to be practiced for centuries afterwards. Under the Tokugawa bakufu, battle and war were almost unknown, and junshi became quite popular with vassals even when their masters died naturally, or in some other way had not met a violent end
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Yamagata Domain
Yamagata Domain
Yamagata Domain
(山形藩, Yamagata-han) was a feudal domain in Edo period Japan, located in Dewa Province
Dewa Province
(modern-day Yamagata Prefecture), Japan. It was centered on Yamagata Castle in what is now the city of Yamagata. Unlike some han whose control was relatively stable throughout the Edo period
Edo period
(1603–1867), Yamagata changed hands a great number of times during its history.Contents1 History 2 List of daimyōs 3 Further reading 4 External links 5 NotesHistory[edit] Much of Dewa Province
Dewa Province
was controlled by the powerful Mogami clan during the Sengoku period
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Mutsu Province
Mutsu Province
Mutsu Province
(陸奥国, Mutsu no kuni) was an old province of Japan in the area of Fukushima, Miyagi, Iwate and Aomori Prefectures and the municipalities of Kazuno and Kosaka in Akita Prefecture. Mutsu Province
Mutsu Province
is also known as Ōshū (奥州) or Michinoku (陸奥 or 道奥). The term Ōu (奥羽) is often used to refer to the combined area of Mutsu and the neighboring province Dewa which make up the Tōhoku region.Contents1 History1.1 Invasion by the Kinai
Kinai
government 1.2 Prosperity of Hiraizumi 1.3 Sengoku period 1.4 After the Boshin War2 Districts2.1 Under Ritsuryō 2.2 Meiji Era3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Mutsu Province
Mutsu Province
from 7c
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Fukuyama Domain
Fukuyama Domain
Fukuyama Domain
(福山藩, Fukuyama-han) was a Japanese domain of the Edo period
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Bungo Province
This article is about the historical province of Japan. For Bungo the Womble, see The Wombles. Bungo Province
Bungo Province
(豊後国, Bungo no kuni) was a province of Japan
Japan
in eastern Kyūshū
Kyūshū
in the area of Ōita Prefecture.[1] It was sometimes called Hōshū (豊州), with Buzen Province. Bungo bordered Buzen, Hyūga, Higo, Chikugo, and Chikuzen Provinces.Contents1 History 2 Shrines and temples 3 Historical districts 4 See also 5 Notes 6 External linksHistory[edit] At the end of the 7th century, Toyo Province was split into Buzen (literally, "the front of Toyo") and Bungo ("the back of Toyo")
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Miyazu Domain
The Miyazu Domain (宮津藩, Miyazu-han) was a Japanese domain of the Edo period, located in Tango Province
Tango Province
(modern-day Miyazu, Kyoto). List of lords[edit]Kyōgoku clan, 1600-1666 (Tozama; 123,000->78,000 koku)Takatomo Takahiro TakakuniTenryō, 1666-1669 Nagai clan, 1669-1680 (Fudai; 73,000 koku)Naoyuki NaonagaAbe clan, 1681-1697 (Fudai; 99,000 koku)MasakuniOkudaira clan, 1697-1717 (Fudai; 90,000 koku)MasashigeAoyama clan, 1717-1758 (Fudai; 48,000 koku)Yoshihide YoshimichiMatsudaira (Honjō) clan (Fudai; 70,000 koku)Sukemasa Suketada Suketsugu Munetada Muneakira Munehide MunetakeReferences[edit](in Japanese) Japanese article on Miyazu (25 Oct. 2007)   This Japanese history–related article is a stub
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Echigo Province
Echigo Province
Echigo Province
(越後国, Echigo no kuni) was an old province in north-central Japan, on the shores of the Sea of Japan. It bordered on Uzen, Iwashiro, Kōzuke, Shinano, and Etchū Provinces.[1] It corresponds today to Niigata Prefecture, minus the island of Sado. Its abbreviated form name was Esshū (越州), with Echizen and Etchū Provinces
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Shimōsa Province
Shimōsa Province
Shimōsa Province
(下総の国, Shimōsa no Kuni) was a province of Japan
Japan
in the area modern Chiba Prefecture, and Ibaraki Prefecture.[1] It lies to the north of the Bōsō Peninsula
Bōsō Peninsula
(房総半島), whose name takes its first kanji from the name of Awa Province and its second from Kazusa and Shimōsa Provinces. Its abbreviated form name was Sōshū (総州) or Hokusō (北総). Shimōsa is classified as one of the provinces of the Tōkaidō. It was bordered by Kazusa Province
Kazusa Province
to the south, Musashi and Kōzuke Provinces to the west, and Hitachi and Shimotsuke Provinces to the north
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Rōjū
The Rōjū (老中), usually translated as Elder, was one of the highest-ranking government posts under the Tokugawa shogunate
Tokugawa shogunate
of Edo period Japan. The term refers either to individual Elders, or to the Council of Elders as a whole; under the first two shōguns, there were only two Rōjū. The number was then increased to five, and later reduced to four
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Tokugawa Ietsugu
Tokugawa Ietsugu; 徳川 家継 (August 8, 1709 – June 19, 1716) was the seventh shōgun of the Tokugawa dynasty, who ruled from 1713 until his death in 1716. He was the son of Tokugawa Ienobu, thus making him the grandson of Tokugawa Tsunashige, daimyō of Kofu, great-grandson of Tokugawa Iemitsu, great-great grandson of Tokugawa Hidetada, and finally the great-great-great grandson of Tokugawa Ieyasu.Contents1 Early life (1709–1713) 2 Family 3 Shōgun
Shōgun
(1713–1716) 4 Death 5 Eras of Ietsugu's bakufu 6 Notes 7 ReferencesEarly life (1709–1713)[edit] Tokugawa Ietsugu
Tokugawa Ietsugu
was born in 1709 in Edo, being the eldest son of shōgun Tokugawa Ienobu
Tokugawa Ienobu
and concubine, Gekkōin. At that time, his father was shōgun, and was being advised by his long-time Confucian advisor, Arai Hakuseki, who held considerable influence in the shōgun's court at Edo
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