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Usurpation Of Sponsianus
Sponsianus
Sponsianus
is believed to have been a Roman usurper, who attempted to seize the throne during the 240's, likely during the rule of Philip the Arab. The sole evidence for his existence is a single aureus of dubious quality.Contents1 Evidence 2 History 3 References3.1 Citations 3.2 Bibliography4 External LinksEvidence[edit] The sole evidence found for his existence was from a single aurei, found in 1713 in Transylvania, among coins bearing the inscription of Philip the Arab
Philip the Arab
and Gordian III, bearing the inscription of Sponsianus. The numismatist Henry Cohen believed them to be "very poor quality modern forgeries"
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Aurei
The aureus (pl. aurei — "golden") was a gold coin of ancient Rome originally valued at 25 pure silver denarii. The aureus was regularly issued from the 1st century BC to the beginning of the 4th century AD, when it was replaced by the solidus. The aureus was about the same size as the denarius, but heavier due to the higher density of gold (as opposed to that of silver.) Before the time of Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
the aureus was struck infrequently, probably because gold was seen as a mark of un-Roman luxury. Caesar struck the coin more often, and standardized the weight at 1 40 displaystyle tfrac 1 40 of a Roman pound
Roman pound
(about 8 grams). Augustus
Augustus
(r
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Transylvania
Transylvania
Transylvania
is a historical region in today's central Romania. Bound on the east and south by its natural borders, the Carpathian mountain range, historical Transylvania
Transylvania
extended westward to the Apuseni Mountains. The term sometimes encompasses not only Transylvania proper, but also the historical regions of Crișana
Crișana
and Maramureș, and occasionally the Romanian part of Banat. The region of Transylvania
Transylvania
is known for the scenery of its Carpathian landscape and its rich history
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Philip The Arab
Marcus Julius Philippus (Latin: Marcus Julius Philippus Augustus, Arabic:ماركوس جوليوس فيليبوس أوغسطس ;[a] c. 204 – 249 AD), also known commonly by his nickname Philip the Arab (Latin: Philippus Arabus, Arabic:فيليب العربي), also known as Philip, was Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
from 244 to 249. He was born in Arabia Petraea, the Roman province
Roman province
of Arabia, in a city situated in modern-day Syria. He went on to become a major figure in the Roman Empire. He achieved power after the death of Gordian III, quickly negotiating peace with the Persian Sassanid Empire. During his reign, the city of Rome
Rome
celebrated its millennium. Among early Christian
Christian
writers, Philip had the reputation of being sympathetic to the Christian
Christian
faith
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Gordian III
Gordian III
Gordian III
(Latin: Marcus Antonius Gordianus Pius Augustus;[1] 20 January 225 AD – 11 February 244 AD) was Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
from 238 AD to 244 AD. At the age of 13, he became the youngest sole legal Roman emperor throughout the existence of the united Roman Empire. Gordian was the son of Antonia Gordiana and an unnamed Roman Senator who died before 238. Antonia Gordiana was the daughter of Emperor Gordian I
Gordian I
and younger sister of Emperor Gordian II. Very little is known of his early life before his acclamation
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Henry Cohen (numismatist)
Henry Cohen (Amsterdam, 21 April 1806 – Paris, 17 May 1880), was a French numismatist, bibliographer and composer. Cohen moved from Amsterdam
Amsterdam
to Paris, where he worked as a music teacher and served as curator of the Cabinet des Médailles
Cabinet des Médailles
at the Bibliothèque nationale de France. He published several works during his lifetime
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Wayne G. Sayles
Wayne G. Sayles (born March 8, 1943) is an American numismatist and author, who specializes in Ancient Numismatics, especially coins of Cilicia
Cilicia
which is located in modern-day Turkey. He is an accomplished Numismatic and Military author having published or contributed to hundreds of books, articles and papers.Contents1 Biography 2 Education 3 Publications 4 Organizational Affiliations 5 Notes and references 6 External linksBiography[edit] Sayles was born in Waukesha, Wisconsin to Wayne F. and Betty J. Sayles. He attended Horicon High School, and upon graduation in 1961 enlisted in the U.S. Air Force. His time in the Air Force included training in Communications-Electronics Maintenance at Keesler AFB, MS, and station assignments in Gander, Newfoundland; Fort Bragg, NC; McCoy AFB, FL; San Isidro AB, Dominican Republic; Incirlik AB, Turkey and McClellan AFB, CA
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Roman Imperial Coinage
Roman Imperial Coinage, abbreviated RIC, is a British catalogue of Roman Imperial currency, from the time of the Battle of Actium (31 BC) to Late Antiquity
Late Antiquity
in 491 AD. It is the result of many decades of work, from 1923 to 1994, and a successor to the previous 8-volume catalogue compiled by the numismatist Henry Cohen in the 19th Century.[1] [2] It is the standard work for numismatic identification of coinage struck by authorisation of Roman emperors.Contents1 Production 2 Contents 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 SourcesProduction[edit] The production of a chronological catalogue of Roman Imperial coinage was started in 1923 by Harold Mattingly, a numismatist at the British Museum, assisted by Edward Allen Sydenham. Their catalogue differed from its predecessor, produced by Henry Cohen in the 19th Century. Although Cohen had classified the coins by emperor, and then alphabetically by the legend (text) on them
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Pannonia
Pannonia
Pannonia
was an ancient province of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
bounded north and east by the Danube, coterminous westward with Noricum
Noricum
and upper Italy, and southward with Dalmatia and upper Moesia
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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Sponsianus
Sponsianus
Sponsianus
is believed to have been a Roman usurper, who attempted to seize the throne during the 240's, likely during the rule of Philip the Arab. The sole evidence for his existence is a single aureus of dubious quality.Contents1 Evidence 2 History 3 References3.1 Citations 3.2 Bibliography4 External LinksEvidence[edit] The sole evidence found for his existence was from a single aurei, found in 1713 in Transylvania, among coins bearing the inscription of Philip the Arab
Philip the Arab
and Gordian III, bearing the inscription of Sponsianus. The numismatist Henry Cohen believed them to be "very poor quality modern forgeries"
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