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Urn
An urn is a vase, often with a cover, that usually has a somehat narrowed neck above a rounded body and a footed pedestal. Describing a vessel as an "urn", as opposed to a vase or other terms, generally reflects its use rather than any particular shape or origin. The term is especially often used for funerary urns, vessels used in burials, either to hold the cremated ashes or as grave goods, but is used in many other contexts; in catering large vessels for serving tea or coffee are often called "tea-urns", even when they are metal cylinders of purely functional design. Large sculpted vases are often called urns, whether placed outdoors, in gardens or as architectural ornaments on buildings, or kept inside.Contents1 Cremation urns 2 Figural urn 3 Other urns 4 See also 5 Notes 6 External linksCremation urns[edit] Funerary urns (also called cinerary urns and burial urns) have been used by many civilizations
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Adam Style
The Adam style
Adam style
(or Adamesque and "Style of the Brothers Adam") is an 18th-century neoclassical style of interior design and architecture, as practised by three Scottish brothers, of whom Robert Adam (1728–1792) and James Adam (1732–1794) were the most widely known. The Adam brothers were the first to advocate an integrated style for architecture and interiors; with walls, ceilings, fireplaces, furniture, fixtures, fittings and carpets all being designed by the Adams as a single uniform scheme
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Test Cricket
Test cricket
Test cricket
is the longest form of the sport of cricket and is considered its highest standard.[1][2] Test matches are played between national representative teams with "Test status", as determined and conferred by the International Cricket
Cricket
Council (ICC). The two teams of 11 players play a four-innings match, which may last up to five days (or longer in some historical cases)
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Death Care Industry
The term Death Care Industry refers to companies and organizations that provide services related to death: funerals, cremation or burial, and memorials. This includes for example funeral homes, coffins, crematoria, cemeteries, and headstones.[1][2] The death care industry within the U.S
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Environmentally Friendly
Environmentally friendly
Environmentally friendly
or environment-friendly, (also referred to as eco-friendly, nature-friendly, and green) are sustainability and marketing terms referring to goods and services, laws, guidelines and policies that claim reduced, minimal, or no harm upon ecosystems or the environment.[1] Companies use these ambiguous terms to promote goods and services, sometimes with additional, more specific certifications, such as ecolabels. Their overuse can be referred to as greenwashing.[2][3][4] The International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
has developed ISO 14020 and ISO 14024 to establish principles and procedures for environmental labels and declarations that certifiers and eco-labellers should follow
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Biodegradation
Biodegradation
Biodegradation
is the disintegration of materials by bacteria, fungi, or other biological means.[a] The term is often used in relation to: biomedicine, waste management, ecology, and the bioremediation of the natural environment. It is now commonly associated with environmentally-friendly products, capable of decomposing back into natural elements. Although often conflated, biodegradable is distinct in meaning from: compostable. While biodegradable simply means can be consumed by microorganisms, compostable makes the further specific demand that the object break down under composting conditions. Organic material can be degraded aerobically (with oxygen) or anaerobically (without oxygen). Decomposition
Decomposition
of biodegradable substances may include both biological and abiotic steps. Biodegradable matter is generally organic material that provides a nutrient for microorganisms
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April Wilkerson
April Wilkerson is an American YouTuber who specializes in Do-it-yourself woodworking and metalworking projects around the home.[2][3][4][5][6] Career[edit] Wilkerson graduated from college in 2012, after studying business management, and began working on projects to improve her house.[1] She said it was difficult getting information about how to build things on the Internet, and started a blog about her experiences with trying to build things or do household fix-up projects, often involving woodworking and construction tools.[1] Her blog led to her creating YouTube videos in which she describes her process of figuring out how build things such as a planter, a light above a pool table, an outdoor pressurized air line between shops, a porch, a coffee table, various art projects, and so forth.[1] She doesn't describe herself as an "expert" but rather as a newcomer and teacher eager to share her newly acquired knowledge as she works on new projects.[1] Generally her projects involve woodw
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Derveni Krater
The Derveni Krater is a volute krater,[1] the most elaborate of its type,[2] discovered in 1962 in a tomb at Derveni, not far from Thessaloniki, and displayed at the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki. Weighing 40 kg, it is made of a bronze with a high tin content of about 15%, which endows it with a superb golden sheen without use of any gold at all.[3] It is dated to the 4th century BC, and was probably made in Athens. Large metalwork vessels are extremely rare survivals in Ancient Greek art, and the Derveni Krater is the outstanding survival from Hellenistic art, as the Vix Krater is from the Archaic period.Contents1 Discovery 2 Technique and decoration 3 Dating 4 Inscription 5 Notes5.1 Bibliography6 External linksDiscovery[edit] The krater was discovered buried, as a funerary urn for a Thessalian aristocrat whose name is engraved on the vase: Astiouneios, son of Anaxagoras, from Larissa
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Amphora
An amphora (Greek: ἀμφορεύς, amphoréus; English plural: amphorae or amphoras) is a type of container of a characteristic shape and size, descending from at least as early as the Neolithic
Neolithic
Period. Amphorae were used in vast numbers for the transport and storage of various products, both liquid and dry, but mostly for wine. They are most often ceramic, but examples in metals and other materials have been found. Versions of the amphorae were one of many shapes used in Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
vase painting. The amphora complements the large storage container, the pithos, which makes available capacities between one-half and two and one-half tons. In contrast, the amphora holds under a half-ton, typically less than 50 kilograms (100 lbs). The bodies of the two types have similar shapes
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Crucible
A crucible is a container that can withstand very high temperatures and is used for metal, glass, and pigment production as well as a number of modern laboratory processes. While crucibles historically were usually made from clay,[1] they can be made from any material that withstands temperatures high enough to melt or otherwise alter its contents.Contents1 History1.1 Typology and chronology 1.2 Chalcolithic 1.3 Iron Age 1.4 Medieval period 1.5 Post Medieval2 Modern-day uses 3 See also 4 References4.1 BibliographyHistory[edit] Typology and chronology[edit] The form of the crucibles has varied through time, with designs reflecting the process for which they are used, as well as regional variation. The earliest crucible forms derive from the sixth/fifth millennium B.C
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Knight Of The Garter
The Order of the Garter
Order of the Garter
(formally the Most Noble Order of the Garter) is an order of chivalry founded by Edward III
Edward III
in 1348 and regarded as the most prestigious British order of chivalry (though in precedence inferior to the military Victoria Cross
Victoria Cross
and George Cross) in England and the United Kingdom. It is dedicated to the image and arms of Saint George, England's patron saint. Appointments are made at the Sovereign's sole discretion. Membership of the Order is limited to the Sovereign, the Prince of Wales, and no more than 24 living members, or Companions. The order also includes supernumerary knights and ladies (e.g., members of the British Royal Family and foreign monarchs)
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English Cricket Team
Test kitODI kitT20I kitAs of 3 April 2018The England
England
cricket team represents England
England
and Wales
Wales
(and until 1992 also Scotland) in international cricket. Since 1 January 1997 it has been governed by the England and Wales Cricket Board
England and Wales Cricket Board
(ECB), having been previously governed by Marylebone Cricket
Cricket
Club (MCC) from 1903 until the end of 1996.[8][9] England
England
and Australia were the first teams to play a Test match (between 15–19 March 1877), and these two countries together with South Africa formed the Imperial Cricket
Cricket
Conference (predecessor to today's International Cricket
Cricket
Council) on 15 June 1909
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Australian Cricket Team
Test kitODI kitT20I kitAs of 26 March 2018The Australia
Australia
national cricket team represents the country of Australia
Australia
in international cricket. It is the joint oldest team in Test cricket
Test cricket
history, having played in the first ever Test match in 1877.[9] The team also plays One Day International
One Day International
cricket and Twenty20 International, participating in both the first ODI, against England
England
in the 1970–71 season[10] and the first Twenty20 International, against New Zealand
New Zealand
in the 2004–05 season,[11] winning both games
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Architecture
Architecture
Architecture
is both the process and the product of planning, designing, and constructing buildings or any other structures.[3] Architectural works, in the material form of buildings, are often perceived as cultural symbols and as works of art. Historical civilizations are often identified with their surviving architectural achievements. The term architecture is also used metaphorically to refer to the design of organizations and other abstract concepts
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Thought Experiment
A thought experiment (German: Gedankenexperiment,[1] Gedanken-Experiment[2] or Gedankenerfahrung[3]) considers some hypothesis, theory,[4] or principle for the purpose of thinking through its consequences
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