HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Upton Sinclair
Upton Sinclair
Upton Sinclair
Jr. (September 20, 1878 – November 25, 1968) was an American writer who wrote nearly 100 books and other works in several genres. Sinclair's work was well known and popular in the first half of the 20th century, and he won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1943. In 1906, Sinclair acquired particular fame for his classic muck-raking novel The Jungle, which exposed labor and sanitary conditions in the U.S. meatpacking industry, causing a public uproar that contributed in part to the passage a few months later of the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act.[1] In 1919, he published The Brass Check, a muck-raking exposé of American journalism that publicized the issue of yellow journalism and the limitations of the “free press” in the United States
[...More...]

"Upton Sinclair" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baltimore, Maryland
Baltimore
Baltimore
(/ˈbɔːltɪmɔːr/, locally [ˈbɔɫmɔɻ]) is the largest city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Maryland, and the 30th-most populous city in the United States. Baltimore
Baltimore
was established by the Constitution of Maryland[9] and is an independent city that is not part of any county. With a population of 611,648 in 2017, Baltimore
Baltimore
is the largest independent city in the United States
[...More...]

"Baltimore, Maryland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

City College Of New York
The City College of the City University of New York
City University of New York
(more commonly referred to as the City College of New York, or simply City College, CCNY, or City) is a public senior college of the City University of New York (CUNY) in New York City. Located in Hamilton Heights
Hamilton Heights
overlooking Harlem
Harlem
in Manhattan, City College's 35-acre (14 ha) Collegiate Gothic
Collegiate Gothic
campus spans Convent Avenue from 130th to 141st Streets.[2] It was initially designed by renowned architect George B. Post, and many of its buildings have achieved landmark status
[...More...]

"City College Of New York" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Great Depression
The Great Depression
Great Depression
was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s.[1] It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century.[2] In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.[3] The Great Depression
Great Depression
started in the United States
United States
after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%
[...More...]

"Great Depression" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Maryland
Motto(s): Fatti maschii, parole femine (English: Strong Deeds, Gentle Words)[3] The Latin text encircling the seal: Scuto bonæ voluntatis tuæ coronasti nos (With favor Wilt Thou Compass Us as with a Shield) Psalm 5:12[4]State song(s): "Maryland, My Maryland"Official language None (English, de facto)Demonym MarylanderCapital AnnapolisLargest city BaltimoreLargest metro Baltimore- Washington Metro
Washington Metro
AreaArea Ranked 42nd • Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km2) • Width 196 miles (315 km) • Length 119 m
[...More...]

"Maryland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alcoholism
Alcoholism, also known as alcohol use disorder (AUD), is a broad term for any drinking of alcohol that results in mental or physical health problems.[12] The disorder was previously divided into two types: alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence.[1][13] In a medical context, alcoholism is said to exist when two or more of the following conditions is present: a person drinks large amounts over a long time period, has difficulty cutting down, acquiring and drinking alcohol takes up a great deal of time, alcohol is strongly desired, usage results in not fulfilling responsibilities, usage results in social problems, usage results in health problems, usage results in risky situations, withdrawal occurs when stopping, and alcohol tolerance has occurred with use.[1] Risky situations include drinking and driving or having unsafe sex, among other things.[1] Alcohol use can affect all parts of the body, but it particularly affects the brain, heart, liver, pancreas, and immune system.[3][4] This can
[...More...]

"Alcoholism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
[...More...]

"American Civil War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Reconstruction Era
The Reconstruction
Reconstruction
era was the period from 1863 (the legal end of most slavery in the United States) or 1865 (the end of the Confederacy) to 1877. In the context of the history of the United States, the term has two applications: the first applies to the complete history of the entire country from 1865 to 1877 following the Civil War; the second, to the attempted transformation of the 11 ex-Confederate states from 1863 to 1877, as directed by Congress. Reconstruction
Reconstruction
ended the remnants of Confederate nationalism and of slavery, making the Freedmen
Freedmen
citizens with civil rights apparently guaranteed by three new Constitutional amendments
[...More...]

"Reconstruction Era" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Queens
Queens
Queens
is the easternmost and largest in area of the five boroughs of New York City. It is geographically adjacent to the borough of Brooklyn
Brooklyn
at the southwestern end of Long Island, and to Nassau County farther east on Long Island; in addition, Queens
Queens
shares water borders with the boroughs of Manhattan
Manhattan
and the Bronx. Coterminous with Queens County since 1899, the borough of Queens
Queens
is the second-largest in population (after Brooklyn), with a census-estimated 2,358,582 residents in 2017,[1] approximately 48% of them foreign-born.[2] Queens
Queens
County also is the second-most populous county in the U.S. state of New York, behind the neighboring borough of Brooklyn, which is coterminous with Kings County
[...More...]

"Queens" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dime Novel
The dime novel is a form of late 19th-century and early 20th-century U.S. popular fiction issued in series of inexpensive paperbound editions
[...More...]

"Dime Novel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Democratic Party (United States)
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (GOP). Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest political party.[16] The Democrats' dominant worldview was once social conservatism and economic liberalism while populism was its leading characteristic in the rural South. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
ran as a third-party candidate in the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party, leading to a switch of political platforms between the Democratic and Republican Party and Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
being elected as the first fiscally progressive Democrat. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

[...More...]

"Democratic Party (United States)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rockefeller
Rockefeller is a surname, and may refer to:Contents1 Rockefeller family 2 Other people 3 Institutions 4 Other 5 See also Rockefeller family[edit] Main article: Rockefeller family John D. Rockefeller
John D. Rockefeller
Sr
[...More...]

"Rockefeller" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Industrial Workers Of The World
3,742 (2016, USA)[3] 1,750 (2017, UK & Ireland)Journal Industrial WorkerKey people § Notable membersOffice location Chicago, Illinois, United StatesCountry InternationalWebsite www.iww.orgThe Industrial Workers of the World
Industrial Workers of the World
(IWW), members of which are commonly termed "Wobblies", is an international labor union that was founded in 1905 in Chicago, Illinois
Illinois
in the United States
United States
of America. The union combines general unionism with industrial unionism, as it is a general union whose members are further organized within the industry of their employment
[...More...]

"Industrial Workers Of The World" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Charlie Chaplin
Sir
Sir
Charles Spencer Chaplin, KBE (16 April 1889 – 25 December 1977) was an English comic actor, filmmaker, and composer who rose to fame in the era of silent film. Chaplin became a worldwide icon through his screen persona "the Tramp" and is considered one of the most important figures in the history of the film industry.[1] His career spanned more than 75 years, from childhood in the Victorian era
Victorian era
until a year before his death in 1977, and encompassed both adulation and controversy. Chaplin's childhood in London
London
was one of poverty and hardship. As his father was absent and his mother struggled financially, he was sent to a workhouse twice before the age of nine. When he was 14, his mother was committed to a mental asylum. Chaplin began performing at an early age, touring music halls and later working as a stage actor and comedian
[...More...]

"Charlie Chaplin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Occult
The occult (from the Latin
Latin
word occultus "clandestine, hidden, secret") is "knowledge of the hidden".[1] In common English usage, occult refers to "knowledge of the paranormal", as opposed to "knowledge of the measurable",[2] usually referred to as science
[...More...]

"Occult" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

William McDougall (psychologist)
William McDougall FRS[2] (/məkˈduːɡəl/; 22 June 1871 – 28 November 1938) was an early 20th century psychologist who spent the first part of his career in the United Kingdom and the latter part in the United States. He wrote a number of highly influential textbooks, and was particularly important in the development of the theory of instinct and of social psychology in the English-speaking world. He was an opponent of behaviourism and stands somewhat outside the mainstream of the development of Anglo-American psychological thought in the first half of the 20th century; but his work was very well-known and respected among lay people.Contents1 Biography 2 Psychical research 3 Animism 4 Selected bibliography 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit] McDougall was educated at Owens College, Manchester and St John's College, Cambridge.[3] He also studied medicine and physiology in London and Göttingen
[...More...]

"William McDougall (psychologist)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.