HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Upper Paleolithic
The Upper Paleolithic
Paleolithic
(or Upper Palaeolithic, Late Stone Age) is the third and last subdivision of the Paleolithic
Paleolithic
or Old Stone Age. Very broadly, it dates to between 50,000 and 10,000 years ago (the beginning of the Holocene), roughly coinciding with the appearance of behavioral modernity and before the advent of agriculture. Anatomically modern humans
Anatomically modern humans
(i.e. Homo sapiens) are believed to have emerged around 200,000 years ago, although these lifestyles changed very little from that of archaic humans of the Middle Paleolithic,[1] until about 50,000 years ago, when there was a marked increase in the diversity of artefacts
[...More...]

"Upper Paleolithic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Khiamian
The Khiamian
Khiamian
(also referred to as El Khiam
El Khiam
or El-Khiam) is a period of the Near-Eastern Neolithic, marking the transition between the Natufian and the Pre-Pottery Neolithic
Neolithic
A
[...More...]

"Khiamian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Khormusan
Khormusan industry was a Paleolithic
Paleolithic
archeological industry in Egypt and Sudan dated at 42,000 to 18,000 BP.[1] The Khormusan industry in Egypt began between 42,000 and 32,000 BP.[2] Khormusans developed tools not only from stone but also from animal bones and hematite.[2] They also developed small arrow heads resembling those of Native Americans,[2] but no bows have been found.[2] The end of the Khormusan industry came around 18,000 BP. with the appearance of other cultures in the region, including the Gemaian.[3] References[edit]^ Goder-Goldberger, Mae (2013). "The Khormusan: Evidence for an MSA East African industry in Nubia". Quaternary International. 300: 182–94. Bibcode:2013QuInt.300..182G. doi:10.1016/j.quaint.2012.11.031.  ^ a b c d "Ancient Egyptian Culture: Paleolithic
Paleolithic
Egypt". Emuseum. Minnesota: Minnesota State University
[...More...]

"Khormusan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pliocene
The Pliocene
Pliocene
( /ˈplaɪəˌsiːn/;[2][3] also Pleiocene[4]) Epoch is the epoch in the geologic timescale that extends from 5.333 million to 2.58[5] million years BP. It is the second and youngest epoch of the Neogene
Neogene
Period in the Cenozoic
Cenozoic
Era. The Pliocene
Pliocene
follows the Miocene Epoch and is followed by the Pleistocene
Pleistocene
Epoch. Prior to the 2009 revision of the geologic time scale, which placed the four most recent major glaciations entirely within the Pleistocene, the Pliocene
Pliocene
also included the Gelasian stage, which lasted from 2.588 to 1.806 million years ago, and is now included in the Pleistocene.[6] As with other older geologic periods, the geological strata that define the start and end are well identified but the exact dates of the start and end of the epoch are slightly uncertain
[...More...]

"Pliocene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Halfan Culture
The Halfan industry is one of the Late Epipalaeolithic
Epipalaeolithic
industries of the Nile Valley
Nile Valley
that began to appear by 19,000-17,000 BP.[1] It is one of the earliest known backed-bladelet industries in Northern Africa, largely dating between 19,000 and 14,000 BP in Nubia
Nubia
and Egypt.[2] The Halfan was formerly seen as the parent culture of the Iberomaurusian
Iberomaurusian
industry in the Maghreb. Since the earliest Iberomaurusian
Iberomaurusian
is dated to ≥ 23,950 BP, it is more likely that the Halfan culture is descended from Ibero-maurusian culture. The Halfan culture is believed to have descended from the Khormusan Culture [3] [4] which depended on specialized hunting, fishing, and collecting techniques for survival. The Halfan people survived on a diet of large herd animals and the Khormusan tradition of fishing
[...More...]

"Halfan Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Agriculture
Agriculture
Agriculture
is the cultivation and breeding of animals and plants to provide food, fiber, medicinal plants and other products to sustain and enhance life.[1] Agriculture
Agriculture
was the key development in the rise of sedentary human civilization, whereby farming of domesticated species created food surpluses that enabled people to live in cities. The study of agriculture is known as agricultural science. The history of agriculture dates back thousands of years; people gathered wild grains at least 105,000 years ago, and began to plant them around 11,500 years ago, before they became domesticated. Pigs, sheep, and cattle were domesticated over 10,000 years ago. Crops originate from at least 11 regions of the world
[...More...]

"Agriculture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Madrasian Culture
The Madrasian culture is a prehistoric archaeological culture of India, dated to the Lower Paleolithic, the earliest subdivision of the Stone Age.[1][2] It belongs to the Acheulian industry, and some scholars consider the distinction between the Madrasian and the broader, regional Acheulian tradition defunct.[3][4] The culture is characterized by bifacial handaxes and cleavers,[5] but also includes flake tools, microliths and other chopping tools. Most were made from quartzite.[6] The Madrasian was named for its type site of Attirampakkam, near to the city of Madras (now known as Chennai), discovered by British archaeologist and geologist Robert Bruce Foote
Robert Bruce Foote
in 1863.[2][3] The oldest tools at Attirampakkam have been dated to 1.5 million years ago using cosmic-ray exposure dating.[7] See also[edit]South Asian Stone Age Soanian
Soanian
cultureReferences[edit]^ Armand, J (1985)
[...More...]

"Madrasian Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Eburran Industry
Eburran industry is the name of the East African tool assemblage from 13,000 BCE and thereafter around Lake Nakuru
Lake Nakuru
in the Ol Doinyo Eburru volcano complex (name giving) in the Rift Valley in Kenya.[1] The culture was a time known as "Kenyan Capsian" because the findings resemble those of the North African Capsian
Capsian
trans-Saharan culture. It was also formerly called "Kenyan Aurignacian". The assemblages, as recovered from Gamble's Cave and Nderit Drift, comprise large backed blades, crescentric microliths, burins, and end-scrapers
[...More...]

"Eburran Industry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Zarzian Culture
Zarzian culture
Zarzian culture
is an archaeological culture of late Paleolithic
Paleolithic
and Mesolithic
Mesolithic
in Southwest Asia. The period of the culture is estimated to have existed about 18,000–8,000 BCE. It was preceded by the Baradostian culture in the same region and was related to the Imereti culture[citation needed] of the Caucasus. The culture was named and recognised of the cave of Zarzi in Iraqi Kurdistan. Here were found plenty of microliths (up to 20% finds). Their forms are short and asymmetric trapezoids, and triangles with hollows. Andy Burns states "The Zarzian of the Zagros region of Iran is contemporary with the Natufian
Natufian
but different from it. The only dates for the entire Zarzian come from Palegawra Cave, and date to 17,300-17,000BP, but it is clear that it is broadly contemporary with the Levantine Kebaran, with which it shares features
[...More...]

"Zarzian Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hominina
Homo
Homo
sapiens † Homo
Homo
erectus other species or subspecies suggestedSynonymsSynonyms Africanthropus
[...More...]

"Hominina" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Qadan Culture
The Qadan culture
Qadan culture
(13,000-9,000 BC) was an ancient culture that, archaeological evidence suggests, originated in Upper Egypt
Upper Egypt
(present day south Egypt) approximately 15,000 years ago [1][2]. This way of life is estimated to have persisted for approximately 4,000 years, and was characterized by hunting, as well as a unique approach to food gathering that incorporated the preparation and consumption of wild grasses and grains.[1][2] Systematic efforts were made by the Qadan people to water, care for, and harvest local plant life, but grains were not planted in ordered rows
[...More...]

"Qadan Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Soanian
The Soanian
Soanian
is an archaeological culture of the Lower Paleolithic
Lower Paleolithic
in the Siwalik region of the Indian subcontinent.[1] Contemporary to the Acheulean, it is named after the Soan Valley in Pakistan. Soanian sites are found along the Sivalik region in present-day India, Nepal and Pakistan.[2]Contents1 Findings 2 Spread across Shivalik Hills region 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksFindings[edit]ChauntraKhasala KalanSivalik HillsSoan RiverMap of the Indian Subcontinent
Indian Subcontinent
showing important sites of the Soanian culture.The term "Soan Culture" was first used by Hellmut De Terra in 1936,[3] but D. N
[...More...]

"Soanian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Clactonian
The Clactonian
Clactonian
is the name given by archaeologists to an industry of European flint tool manufacture that dates to the early part of the interglacial period known as the Hoxnian, the Mindel-Riss or the Holstein stages (c. 400,000 years ago). Clactonian
Clactonian
tools were made by Homo heidelbergensis.[1] It is named after 400,000-year-old finds made by Hazzledine Warren in a palaeochannel at Clacton-on-Sea
Clacton-on-Sea
in the English county of Essex
Essex
in 1911. The artefacts found there included flint chopping tools, flint flakes and the tip of a worked wooden shaft along with the remains of a giant elephant and hippopotamus
[...More...]

"Clactonian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aterian
The Aterian
Aterian
is a Middle Stone Age
Stone Age
(or Middle Palaeolithic) stone tool industry centered in North Africa, but also possibly found in Oman
Oman
and the Thar Desert.[1] The earliest Aterian
Aterian
dates to c. 145,000 years ago, at the site of Ifri n'Ammar in Morocco.[2] However, most of the early dates cluster around the beginning of the Last Interglacial, around 130,000 years ago, when the environment of North Africa
North Africa
began to ameliorate
[...More...]

"Aterian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Micoquien
The Micoquien
Micoquien
is an early middle paleolithic industry, that is found in the Eemian
Eemian
and in an early episode of the Würm glaciation
Würm glaciation
(about 130,000 to 70,000 BCE). The Micoquien
Micoquien
is distinguished technologically by the appearance of distinctly asymmetrical bifaces. Its discoverer and namer was the archeologist and art trader Otto Hauser.[1][2][3] Hauser then sold a great number of so-called Micoque-wedges that he found in excavations in La Micoque (in Les Eyzies-de-Tayac-Sireuil, Dordogne, France) to museums and collectors. The specially formed handaxes from La Micoque exhibited an often a rounded base
[...More...]

"Micoquien" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Holocene
The Holocene
Holocene
( /ˈhɒləˌsiːn, ˈhoʊ-/)[2][3] is the current geological epoch. It began after the Pleistocene[4], approximately 11,650 cal years before present.[5] The Holocene
Holocene
is part of the Quaternary
Quaternary
period. Its name comes from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
words ὅλος (holos, whole or entire) and καινός (kainos, new), meaning "entirely recent".[6] It has been identified with the current warm period, known as MIS 1, and is considered by some to be an interglacial period. The Holocene
Holocene
encompasses the growth and impacts of the human species worldwide, including all its written history, development of major civilizations, and overall significant transition toward urban living in the present
[...More...]

"Holocene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.