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University Of Ghent
Ghent
Ghent
University
University
(Dutch: Universiteit Gent, abbreviated as UGent) is a public research university located in Ghent, Belgium. It was established in 1817 by King William I of the Netherlands. After the Belgian revolution
Belgian revolution
of 1830, the newly formed Belgian state began to administer the university. In 1930, it became the first Dutch-speaking university in Belgium, whereas French had previously been the standard academic language. In 1991, the university was granted major autonomy and changed its name accordingly from State University
University
of Ghent (Dutch: Rijksuniversiteit Gent, abbreviated as RUG) to its current designation. In contrast to the Catholic University
University
of Leuven or the Free University
University
of Brussels, UGent considers itself a pluralist university in a special sense, i.e
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Blandijnberg
The Blandijnberg
Blandijnberg
is a 29m high hill in the city center of Ghent
Ghent
in East Flanders, Belgium.Contents1 History 2 Cycling 3 References 4 See alsoHistory[edit] The Blandijnberg
Blandijnberg
was already inhabited in prehistoric times. In the 3rd century AD. there was a Gallo-Roman villa on the hill, owned by a person named Blandinus. In the 7th century, Saint Amand
Saint Amand
founded the Benedictine
Benedictine
Saint Peter's Abbey on top of the Blandijnberg. The area around the abbey was known as Sint-Pietersdorp (Saint Peter's Village). With the expansion of Ghent
Ghent
in the 13th century, the abbey was included in the walled city. At the end of the Ancien Régime, the church possessions on the Blandijnberg
Blandijnberg
were confiscated by the city
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Flamenpolitik
Flamenpolitik
Flamenpolitik
(German; "Flemish policy") is the name for certain policies pursued by German authorities occupying Belgium during World War I and World War II. The ultimate goal of these policies was the dissolution of Belgium into separate Walloon and Flemish components. The German authorities aimed to exploit the longstanding linguistic problems in Belgium, particularly the systematic discrimination towards the Dutch language
Dutch language
that existed before World War I. The policy was also based on Pan-Germanism
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Pierre Nolf
Pierre Nolf
Pierre Nolf
(Ypres, 26 July 1873 – Brussels, 14 September 1953) was a Belgian scientist and politician. In 1940, he was nominated for the Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
for Physiology or Medicine, but the prize was not granted that year. In 1940 he received the Francqui Prize for Biological and Medical Sciences. External links[edit]Short biography of Pierre Nolf
Pierre Nolf
(redcross.int) Nomination for the Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
(nobelprize.org)Authority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 56745484 ISNI: 0000 0000 5512 6226 SUDOC: 079064167 BNF: cb13074198t (data) NKC: nlk20010095869 BNE: XX4711844This article about a Belgian scientist is a stub
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August Vermeylen
August Vermeylen
August Vermeylen
(12 May 1872 in Brussels
Brussels
– 10 January 1945 in Uccle) was a Belgian writer and literature critic. In 1893 he founded the literary journal Van Nu en Straks
Van Nu en Straks
(Of Today and Tomorrow). He studied history at the Free University of Brussels
Brussels
(ULB), and became a professor of literature and of art history at the ULB (1901–1923). In addition to many works of literary and art criticism, he wrote poetry and in 1906 a novel, De wandelende Jood (English: The Wandering Jew). A cultural organization, the Vermeylenfonds, was named after him. Politically, Vermeylen supported both the unitarian Belgian state (to the point of condemning the Flemish Pro-German activists during World War I) and an equal status for the Dutch language in that state. From 1921 to his death he was a senator for the Belgian Labour Party
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Student Activism
Student
Student
activism is work by students to cause political, environmental, economic, or social change. Although often focused on schools, curriculum, and educational funding, student groups have influenced greater political events.[1] Modern student activist movements vary widely in subject, size, and success, with all kinds of students in all kinds of educational settings participating, including public and private school students; elementary, middle, senior, undergraduate, and graduate students; and all races, socio-economic backgrounds, and political perspectives.[2] Some student protests focus on the internal affairs of a specific institution; others focus on broader issues such as a war or dictatorship. Likewise, some student protests focus on an institution's impact on the world, such as a disinvestment campaign, while others may focus on a regional or national policy's impact on the institution, such as a campaign against government education policy
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Blandijn
The Blandijn, short for Blandijnberg, is a building complex of Ghent University in the Belgian city Ghent
Ghent
and directly adjacent to Boekentoren, the tower of the Ghent University
Ghent University
Library. The Blandijn, named after the Blandijnberg
Blandijnberg
hill it stands on, houses the Faculty of Arts & Philosophy. The first part of the Blandijn
Blandijn
buildings was officially opened in 1960.[1] The Blandijn
Blandijn
complex is located centrally in Ghent's student neighborhood. There are several other university buildings within walking distance of the Blandijn. In the 1960s to 1980s, there were several student demonstrations at the site of the Blandijn.[2] The severest demonstrations took place in 1969 in the wake of May 1968
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May 1968 In France
StudentsUnion Nationale des Étudiants de FranceUnionsCGT FOAnarchists French Communist Party Situationist International Federation of the Democratic and Socialist Left Government of FranceMinistry of the Interior Police nationale Compagnies Républicaines de SécuritéFrench Armed ForcesGaullist PartyLead figuresNon-centralized leadership François Mitterrand Pierre Mendès FranceCharles de Gaulle (President of France) Georges Pompidou (Prime Minister of France)The volatile period of civil unrest in France
France
during May 1968 was punctuated by demonstrations and massive general strikes as well as the occupation of universities and factories across France
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Flemish Community
The term Flemish
Flemish
Community (Dutch: Vlaamse Gemeenschap [ˈvlaːmsə ɣəˈmeːnsxɑp] ( listen); French: Communauté flamande [kɔmynote flamɑ̃d]; German: Flämische Gemeinschaft [ˈflɛːmɪʃə ɡəˈmaɪ̯nʃaft]) has two distinct, though related, meanings:Culturally and sociologically, it refers to Flemish
Flemish
organizations, media, social and cultural life; alternative expressions for this concept might be the " Flemish
Flemish
people" or the " Flemish
Flemish
nation" (in a similar sense as the Scottish, Welsh, or Québécois people are nations, referring to an ethnic identity)
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Faculty (division)
A faculty is a division within a university or college comprising one subject area, or a number of related subject areas.[1] In American usage such divisions are generally referred to as colleges (e.g., "college of arts and sciences") or schools (e.g., "school of business"), but may also mix terminology (e.g., Harvard University
University
has a "faculty of arts and sciences" but a "law school").Contents1 Overview 2 Faculty of Art2.1 Course of study3 Faculty of Classics 4 Faculty of Commerce 5 Faculty of Economics 6 Faculty of Education6.1 Other faculties7 Faculty of Engineering 8 Facult
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Boekentoren
The Boekentoren, (Dutch for Book Tower) is a famous building located in Ghent, Belgium, designed by the Belgian
Belgian
architect Henry van de Velde. It is part of the Ghent
Ghent
University Library and currently houses 3 million books. The Boekentoren
Boekentoren
is directly adjacent to the Blandijn, the buildings of the Faculty of Arts and Philosophy.Contents1 History 2 Restoration 3 Trivia 4 See also 5 Photo gallery 6 External linksHistory[edit] In 1933 the famous Flemish architect Henry van de Velde
Henry van de Velde
(1863–1957) was commissioned to design a building for the Library and the Institutes of Art History, Veterinarian Studies and Pharmaceutical sciences of the Ghent
Ghent
University (Universiteit Gent) on the premises of the former De Vreese Alley on the Blandijnberg
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Public University
A public university is a university that is predominantly funded by public means through a national or subnational government, as opposed to private universities
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Google Books Library Project
Google
Google
Books (previously known as Google
Google
Bo
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Papyrus 30
Papyrus 30 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), designated by P displaystyle mathfrak P 30, is an early copy of the New Testament in Greek. It is a papyrus manuscript of the Pauline epistles, it contains only 1 Thess 4:12-5:18. 25-28; 2 Thess 1:1-2; 2:1.9-11. The manuscript paleographically has been assigned to the 3rd century.[1]Contents1 Description 2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksDescription[edit] The manuscript is written in large uncial letters. The nomina sacra are abbreviated. The number of the pages suggest that the manuscript was a collection of the Pauline epistles.[2] It is a carefully executed manuscript.[3] The Greek text of this codex is a representative of the Alexandrian text-type (rather proto-Alexandrian)
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