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Universal Carrier
The Universal Carrier, also known as the Bren Gun Carrier from the light machine gun armament,[3] is a common name describing a family of light armoured tracked vehicles built by Vickers-Armstrongs
Vickers-Armstrongs
and other companies. The first carriers – the Bren Carrier and the Scout Carrier with specific roles – entered service before the war, but a single improved design that could replace these, the Universal, was introduced in 1940. The vehicle was used widely by British Commonwealth forces during the Second World War. Universal Carriers were usually used for transporting personnel and equipment, mostly support weapons, or as machine gun platforms
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Bren Light Machine Gun
Czechoslovakia, United KingdomService historyIn service 1938–2006Used by See UsersWars World War II Indonesian National Revolution First Indochina War Chinese Civil War Second Sino-Japanese War Greek Civil War Malayan Emergency Korean War Suez Crisis 1958 Lebanon Crisis Sino-Indian War Congo Crisis Portuguese Colonial War Rhodesian Bush War The Troubles Falklands War Aden EmergencyProduction historyDesigned 1935Manufacturer Royal Small Arms Factory Enfield John Inglis and Company Long Branch Factory Ishapore
Ishapore
Rifle
Rifle
FactoryProduced 1935–1971Variants Mk I, II, III, IV L4SpecificationsWeight Mk1 & Mk2: 22.83 lb (10.35 kg), 25 lb (11.25 kg) loaded
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Sten
Mk. I, II, IIS, III, IV, V, VI Unit Cost $10 or £2.3 in 1942SpecificationsWeight 3.2 kg (7.1 lb) (Mk. II)Length 760 mm (30 in)Barrel length 196 mm (7.7 in)Cartridge 9×19mm
9×19mm
ParabellumAction Blowback-operated, Open boltRate of fire version dependent; ~500-600 round/minMuzzle velocity365 m/s (1,198 ft/s) 305 m/s (1,001 ft/s) (suppressed models)Effective firing range 100 mFeed system 32-round detachable box magazineSights fixed peep rear, post frontThe STEN (or Sten
Sten
gun) was a family of British submachine guns chambered in 9×19mm
9×19mm
and used extensively by British and Commonwealth forces throughout World War II
World War II
and the Korean War
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Thornycroft
Thornycroft
Thornycroft
was a United Kingdom-based vehicle manufacturer which built coaches, buses, and trucks from 1896 until 1977.Contents1 History 2 Models2.1 Bus
Bus
and coach 2.2 Lorry3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Thornycroft
Thornycroft
Steam Wagon of 1897 with tipper body to act as a dust-cart Thornycroft
Thornycroft
steam wagon of 1905John Isaac Thornycroft, the naval engineer, also formed the Thornycroft
Thornycroft
Steam Carriage and Van Company which built its first steam van in 1896. This was exhibited at The Great Exhibition, and could carry a load of 1 ton. It was fitted with a Thornycroft
Thornycroft
marine launch-type boiler ( Thornycroft
Thornycroft
announced a new boiler designed for their steam carriages in October 1897[1])
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Aveling-Barford
Aveling-Barford
Aveling-Barford
was a large engineering company making road rollers, motorgraders, front loaders, sitedumpers, dump trucks and articulated dumptrucks or ADTs in Grantham, Lincolnshire. In its time, it was an internationally known company.Contents1 History1.1 Ruston and Hornsby 1.2 Public company 1.3 British Leyland 1.4 Products 1.5 Modern day incarnation2 Former employees 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Ruston and Hornsby[edit] It had a dramatic formation, and was established by people not new to its field of engineering. It was formed in February 1934[1] when Aveling and Porter
Aveling and Porter
of Rochester, Kent
Rochester, Kent
effectively went bankrupt, when the parent company Agricultural & General Engineers (AGE) went into receivership in 1932
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Wolseley Motors
Wolseley Motors
Wolseley Motors
Limited was a British motor vehicle manufacturer founded in early 1901 by the Vickers
Vickers
armaments combine in conjunction with Herbert Austin. It initially made a full range topped by large luxury cars and dominated the market in the Edwardian era. The Vickers brothers died[note 1] and without their guidance Wolseley expanded rapidly after the war, manufacturing 12,000 cars in 1921, and remained the biggest motor manufacturer in Britain. Over-expansion led to receivership in 1927 when it was bought from Vickers
Vickers
Limited by William Morris as a personal investment and years later moved into his Morris Motors
Morris Motors
empire just before the Second World War
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Ford Motor Company Of Canada
Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
of Canada
Canada
Ltd. (French: Ford
Ford
du Canada
Canada
Limitée) was founded on August 17, 1904 for the purpose of manufacturing and selling Ford
Ford
automobiles in Canada
Canada
and the British Empire. It was originally known as the Walkerville Wagon Works,[1] and was located in Walkerville, Ontario
Ontario
(now part of Windsor, Ontario)
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South Australian Railways
South Australian Railways
South Australian Railways
was the statutory corporation through which the Government of South Australia
South Australia<

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British Expeditionary Force (World War II)
The British Expeditionary Force (BEF) was the name of the British Army in Western Europe
Western Europe
from 1939 to 1940 during the Second World War. In the 1930s, the British government had planned to deter war by rearming from the very low level of readiness of the early 1930s. The first step was the abolition of the Ten Year Rule but the bulk of the extra money went to the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
and the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF). Plans had been made to re-equip a small number of Regular and Territorial divisions, potentially for service overseas. The BEF had been established in 1938, in readiness for war, after Nazi Germany annexed Austria in the Anschluss
Anschluss
of March 1938 and made claims on Sudetenland
Sudetenland
in Czechoslovakia, that led to the Munich Agreement
Munich Agreement
(30 September 1938)
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Humber Scout Car
The Humber Scout Car
Humber Scout Car
was a British light scout car used in the Second World War. It entered service in 1942 and continued in production until 1945. Designed for reconnaissance, and liaison between armoured units, it provided protection only against light arms fire, so was not a front line vehicle. More importantly it was small and fast and could quickly evade trouble. It became the shape format for the post war Ferret armoured car
Ferret armoured car
which began production in 1952.Contents1 History 2 Operators 3 Variants 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]Humber Scout Car, side view.Although at the outbreak of the Second World War the British Army
British Army
had already selected the Daimler Dingo
Daimler Dingo
for production, the need for scout cars could not be met by Daimler alone, so other companies were required to produce similar vehicles
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Battalion
A battalion is a military unit. The use of the term "battalion" varies by nationality and branch of service. Typically a battalion consists of 300 to 800 soldiers and is divided into a number of companies. A battalion is typically commanded by a lieutenant colonel. In some countries the word "battalion" is associated with the infantry. The term was first used in Italian as battaglione no later than the 16th century
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Non-commissioned Officer
A non-commissioned officer or noncommissioned officer (NCO, colloquially non-com or noncom) is a military officer who has not earned a commission.[1][2][3] Such is also called sub-officer in some countries. Non-commissioned officers, in the English-speaking world, usually obtain their position of authority by promotion through the enlisted ranks.[4] In contrast, commissioned officers hold higher ranks than NCOs, have more legal responsibilities, are paid more, and often have more non-military training such as a university diploma. Commissioned officers
Commissioned officers
usually earn their commissions without having risen through the enlisted ranks
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Wireless Set No. 38
The Wireless Set No. 38
Wireless Set No. 38
was a HF portable man-pack radio transceiver used by the British Army
British Army
during World War II. Designed by Murphy Radio, it was a 5 valve set covering 7.4 to 9 MHz and powered by a large dry cell battery carried in a separate haversack.[1] An AFV variant was also developed for use alongside the Wireless Set No. 19 in armoured vehicles to allow direct communication between tank commanders and infantry.[2] In 1945, a Mk
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Morris Motors
W. R. Morris (1912–1952) BMC (1952–1968) British Leyland
British Leyland
(1968–1986) Rover Group
Rover Group
(1986–1988) BAe (1988–1994) BMW
BMW
(1994–2000) MG Rover Group
Rover Group
(2000–2005) NAC (2005–2007) Morris Motors
Morris Motors
Limited was a British privately owned motor vehicle manufacturing company formed in 1919 to take over the assets of William Morris's WRM Motors Limited and continue production of the same vehicles. By 1926 its production represented 42 per cent of British car manufacture — a remarkable expansion rate attributed to William Morris's practice of buying in major as well as minor components and assembling them in his own factory
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Artillery Tractor
An artillery tractor, also referred to as a gun tractor, is a specialized heavy-duty form of tractor unit used to tow artillery pieces of varying weights and calibres. It may be wheeled, tracked, or half-tracked.Contents1 Traction 2 History2.1 World War I 2.2 World War II 2.3 Modern warfare3 List of artillery tractors3.1 Wheeled 3.2 Half-tracked 3.3 Tracked, tank chassis 3.4 Tracked, other chassis4 See also 5 References5.1 Notes 5.2 Bibliography6 Further reading 7 External linksTraction[edit] There are two main types of artillery tractors, depending on the type of traction: wheeled and tracked.Wheeled tractors are usually variations of lorries adapted for military service. Tracked tractors run on continuous track; in some cases are built on a modified tank chassis with the superstructure replaced with a compartment for the gun crew or ammunition.In addition, half-track tractors were used in the interwar period and in World War II, especially by the Wehrmacht
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Ordnance QF 6 Pounder
The Ordnance Quick-Firing 6-pounder 7 cwt, or just 6 pounder,[note 1] was a British 57 mm gun, serving as a primary anti-tank gun of the British Army
British Army
during World War II, as well as the main armament for a number of armoured fighting vehicles. Although planned before the start of the war, it did not reach service until the North African Campaign
North African Campaign
in April 1942. There it replaced the 2 pounder in the anti-tank role, allowing the 25 pounder gun-howitzer to revert to its intended artillery role
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