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United Synagogue Of Conservative Judaism
The United Synagogue
United Synagogue
of Conservative Judaism
Conservative Judaism
(USCJ) is the largest network of Conservative Jewish congregations in the world, united by a shared purpose to inspire current and future generations of Jews to seek meaning, find connection, and experience wholeness in a world that is complex and ever evolving. USCJ closely works with the Rabbinical Assembly, the international body of Conservative rabbis, the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, and the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies.[6] USCJ works to strengthen Jewish communities inside and outside the walls of a synagogue. It functions as the network that ensures there are thriving centers of Jewish practice throughout North America, Israel, and beyond that celebrate both tradition and contemporary life
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United Synagogue
The United Synagogue
Synagogue
is a union of British Orthodox Jewish
Orthodox Jewish
synagogues, representing the central Orthodox movement in Judaism
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Cantors Assembly
Cantors Assembly (CA) is the international association of hazzanim (cantors) affiliated with Conservative Judaism. Cantors Assembly was founded in 1947 to develop the profession of the hazzan, to foster the fellowship and welfare of hazzanim, and to establish a conservatory for hazzanim.[2] The latter goal was realized in 1952 with the establishment of the Cantors Institute at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. This Institute later developed into the H
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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American Jewish Historical Society
The American Jewish Historical Society
American Jewish Historical Society
is the oldest ethnic, cultural archive in the United States
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Conservative Halakha
Conservative Judaism
Judaism
views halakha (Jewish law) as normative[1] and binding.[2] The Conservative movement applies Jewish law to the full range of Jewish belief and practice, including thrice-daily prayer, Shabbat
Shabbat
and holidays, marital relations and family purity, conversion, dietary laws (kashrut), and Jewish medical ethics. Institutionally, the Conservative movement rules on Jewish law both through centralized decisions, primarily by the Rabbinical Assembly and its Committee on Jewish Law and Standards, and through congregational rabbis at the local level. Conservative authorities produced a voluminous Responsa literature. Conservative Jewish thinkers take the position that halakha can and should evolve to meet the changing reality of Jewish life. Conservative Judaism, therefore, views that traditional Jewish legal codes must be viewed through the lens of academic criticism
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Leadership Council Of Conservative Judaism
The Leadership Council of Conservative Judaism, also known as the LCCJ, is a council made up of members of the various arms of the Conservative movement, a formal movement within the Jewish denomination of Conservative Judaism. LCCJ representatives meet twice a year at The Jewish Theological Seminary of America, in New York City, to co-ordinate on issues of movement-wide concern. One of the first projects approved by the LCCJ was Emet Ve-Emunah: Statement of Principles of Conservative Judaism, published in 1988. For much of the Conservative movement's history, the movement avoided publishing systematic explications of faith. This was a conscious attempt to hold together a wide coalition. This concern largely became a non-issue after the left-wing of the movement seceded in 1968 to form the Reconstructionist Judaism
Reconstructionist Judaism
movement, and after the right-wing seceded in 1985 to form the Union for Traditional Judaism
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Committee On Jewish Law And Standards
The Committee on Jewish Law and Standards is the central authority on halakha (Jewish law and tradition) within Conservative Judaism; it is one of the most active and widely known committees on the Conservative movement's Rabbinical Assembly. Within the movement it is known as the CJLS. The current Chairman of the CJLS is Rabbi Elliot Dorff.Contents1 History 2 Process 3 Responsa 4 Difference in methodology from Orthodoxy4.1 Takkanot: Significant legislative changes in Jewish law5 Criticisms of the CJLS 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The Committee on Jewish Law was created by the Rabbinical Assembly (RA) in 1927. Max Drob was the first chair of the Committee. The Committee was tasked with including representatives from the "Various tendencies" of the Rabbinical Assembly
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American Jewish University
The American Jewish University, formerly the separate institutions University of Judaism and Brandeis-Bardin Institute, is a Jewish institution in Los Angeles, California. Its largest component is its Whizin Center for Continuing Education in which 12,000 students are enrolled annually in non-credit granting courses. A prominent program of the Center is the university's annual speaker series, featuring luminaries like Tony Blair, Colin Powell, and other political and diplomatic leaders. AJU's academic division includes the College of Arts and Sciences, leading to a B.A. degree in majors such as Biology & Bioethics (pre-med), Business Administration & Innovation, Media Arts, Jewish Studies, Politics & Global Studies, and Psychology. In addition, AJU offers graduate degrees through the Fingerhut School of Education, The David L. Lieber Graduate School, and the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, a Conservative Jewish rabbinical seminary
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Masorti On Campus
Masorti on Campus
Masorti on Campus
(MoC) is a student organization for Conservative Judaism (also known as "Masorti") on North American college and university campuses; working with Hillel and other Jewish campus life organizations.[2] MoC connects students and Jewish professionals from different campuses through a range of forums to share ideas for building and strengthening progressive Jewish communities.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 External links 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Masorti on Campus
Masorti on Campus
was launched in July 2013 by Eric Leiderman and Douglas Kandl in response to the closing of Koach
Koach
by the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism.[3] Gaining the support of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America
Jewish Theological Seminary of America
(JTS), MoC began its campaign to create a network for existing campus communities
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Miller Introduction To Judaism Program
The Louis and Judith Miller Introduction to Judaism
Judaism
Program is an educational institute based at the American Jewish University
American Jewish University
in Bel Air, Los Angeles, California. It has, since its founding in 1986, helped thousands of students explore and deepen their Jewish roots or prepare for conversion to Judaism.[1] Based primarily at AJU’s Familian Campus in Bel Air, as well as at a number of other Southern California locations[2][3][4][5] and throughout the United States, the Miller Program helps people of all backgrounds find a home in the Jewish community.[5] The core of the Miller Introduction to Judaism
Judaism
Program is an 18-week course[5] that surveys Jewish living and practice, including history, ritual, culture, texts, and values
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Schechter Institute Of Jewish Studies
Schechter Institute of Jewish Studies, (Hebrew: מכון שכטר למדעי היהדות‎, Machon Schechter) located in Jerusalem, Israel, is an academic institution affiliated with Conservative Judaism.Contents1 History 2 Notable faculty 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Founded in 1984 by the Jewish Theological Seminary (N.Y.) and Israel's Masorti Movement as a rabbinical seminary known as "The Seminary of Judaic Studies," the Schechter Institute has been located since 1990 in Neve Granot, a neighborhood behind the Israel
Israel
Museum. The campus in Jerusalem, in addition to its
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Solomon Schechter Day School Association
The Schechter Day School Network, formerly the Solomon Schechter
Solomon Schechter
Day School Association, located at 820 Second Avenue, New York, New York, is the organization of Jewish day schools that identify with Conservative Judaism.[1][2] The network provides guidance and resources for its member schools in the United States and Canada.Contents1 Mission and functions 2 History 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksMission and functions[edit] The express mission of the network is to promote:the continued growth and vitality of its member schools, which
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Camp Ramah
Camp Ramah
Camp Ramah
(Hebrew: מחנה רמה‎ Machaneh Ramah) is a network of Jewish
Jewish
summer camps affiliated with the Conservative Movement.[1][2][3] The camps operate in the United States, Canada, and Israel
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Kadima (youth Group)
Kadima (Hebrew: קדימה, literally "forward") is a youth group affiliated with the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism
United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism
(USCJ), specifically aimed at Jewish preteens living in North America in Grades 6-8
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