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United States District Court For The District Of Delaware
The United States District Court for the District of Delaware
Delaware
(in case citations, D. Del.) is the Federal district court having jurisdiction over the entire state of Delaware. The Court sits in Wilmington. Currently, four district judges and three magistrate judges preside over the court. The Court is notable for hearing and trying a large number of patent and other complex commercial disputes. In addition, it has limited original and broad appellate jurisdiction over bankruptcy disputes which are filed with the United States Bankruptcy
Bankruptcy
Court for the District of Delaware. Appeals from the Court are heard by the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, which sits in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (except for patent claims and claims against the U.S
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Tucker Act
The Tucker Act
Tucker Act
(March 3, 1887, ch
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Commerce
Commerce
Commerce
is "related to the exchange of goods and services, especially on a large scale".[1] Commerce
Commerce
includes legal, economic, political, social, cultural and technological systems that are in operation in any country or internationally.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 See also 4 ReferencesEtymology[edit] Commerce
Commerce
is derived from the Latin
Latin
commercium, from cum and merx, merchandise.[2] History[edit]The caduceus has been used today as the symbol of commerce[3] with which Mercury has traditionally been associated.Some commentators trace the origins of commerce to the very start of transaction in prehistoric times
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Senior Status
Senior status is a form of semi-retirement for United States federal judges, and judges in some state court systems. A judge must be at least 65 years of age and have served in federal courts for 15 years to qualify, with one less year of service required for each additional year of age. When that happens, they receive the full salary of a judge but have the option to take a reduced caseload, although many senior judges choose to continue to work full-time. Additionally, senior judges do not occupy seats; instead, their seats become vacant, and the President may appoint new full-time judges to fill their spots. Depending on how heavy a caseload they carry, senior judges remain entitled to maintain a staffed office, including a secretary and one or more law clerks
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Judiciary Act Of 1789
The Judiciary Act of 1789
Judiciary Act of 1789
(ch. 20, 1 Stat. 73) was a United States federal statute adopted on September 24, 1789, in the first session of the First United States Congress. It established the federal judiciary of the United States.[3][4][5][6] Article III, Section 1 of the Constitution prescribed that the "judicial power of the United States, shall be vested in one supreme Court, and such inferior Courts" as Congress saw fit to establish. It made no provision for the composition or procedures of any of the courts, leaving this to Congress to decide.[7] The existence of a separate federal judiciary had been controversial during the debates over the ratification of the Constitution. Anti-Federalists had denounced the judicial power as a potential instrument of national tyranny. Indeed, of the ten amendments that eventually became the Bill of Rights, five (the fourth through the eighth) dealt primarily with judicial proceedings
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United States Court Of Appeals For The Federal Circuit
The United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit
United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit
(Federal Circuit; in case citations, Fed. Cir. or C.A.F.C.) is a United States court of appeals headquartered in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
The court was created by Congress with passage of the Federal Courts Improvement Act of 1982, which merged the United States Court of Customs and Patent Appeals and the appellate division of the United States Court of Claims, making the judges of the former courts into circuit judges.[1][2] The Federal Circuit is particularly known for its decisions on patent law, as it is the only appellate-level court with the jurisdiction to hear patent case appeals.[3] The court occupies the Howard T
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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
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United States Bankruptcy Court
United States bankruptcy courts are courts created under Article I of the United States Constitution.[1] The current system of bankruptcy courts was created by United States Congress
United States Congress
in 1978, effective April 1, 1984.[2] United States bankruptcy courts function as units of the district courts and have subject-matter jurisdiction over bankruptcy cases. The federal district courts have original and exclusive jurisdiction over all cases arising under the bankruptcy code, (see 28 U.S.C. § 1334(a)), and bankruptcy cases cannot be filed in state court. Each of the 94 federal judicial districts handles bankruptcy matters. Technically, the United States district courts
United States district courts
have subject matter jurisdiction over bankruptcy matters (see 28 U.S.C. § 1334(a))
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Bankruptcy
Bankruptcy
Bankruptcy
is a legal status of a person or other entity that cannot repay debts to creditors. In most jurisdictions, bankruptcy is imposed by a court order, often initiated by the debtor. Bankruptcy
Bankruptcy
is not the only legal status that an insolvent person may have, and the term bankruptcy is therefore not a synonym for insolvency. In some countries, such as the United Kingdom, bankruptcy is limited to individuals; other forms of insolvency proceedings (such as liquidation and administration) are applied to companies. In the United States, bankruptcy is applied more broadly to formal insolvency proceedings
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Jurisdiction
Jurisdiction
Jurisdiction
(from the Latin
Latin
ius, iuris meaning "law" and dicere meaning "to speak") is the practical authority granted to a legal body to administer justice within a defined field of responsibility, e.g., Michigan tax law. In federations like the United States, areas of jurisdiction apply to local, state, and federal levels; e.g. the court has jurisdiction to apply federal law. Colloquially it is used to refer to the geographical area to which such authority applies, e.g. the court has jurisdiction over all of Colorado
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Patent
A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a sovereign state or intergovernmental organization to an inventor or assignee for a limited period of time in exchange for detailed public disclosure of an invention. An invention is a solution to a specific technological problem and is a product or a process.[1]:17 Patents are a form of intellectual property. The procedure for granting patents, requirements placed on the patentee, and the extent of the exclusive rights vary widely between countries according to national laws and international agreements. Typically, however, a granted patent application must include one or more claims that define the invention. A patent may include many claims, each of which defines a specific property right. These claims must meet relevant patentability requirements, such as novelty, usefulness, and non-obviousness
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Judge
A judge is a person who presides over court proceedings, either alone or as a part of a panel of judges. The powers, functions, method of appointment, discipline, and training of judges vary widely across different jurisdictions. The judge is supposed to conduct the trial impartially and, typically, in an open court. The judge hears all the witnesses and any other evidence presented by the barristers of the case, assesses the credibility and arguments of the parties, and then issues a ruling on the matter at hand based on his or her interpretation of the law and his or her own personal judgment. In some jurisdictions, the judge's powers may be shared with a jury
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Wilmington, Delaware
Wilmington (Lenape: Paxahakink, Pakehakink[6]) is the most populous city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Delaware. The city was built on the site of Fort Christina, the first Swedish settlement in North America. It is at the confluence of the Christina River
Christina River
and Brandywine River, near where the Christina flows into the Delaware
Delaware
River. It is the county seat of New Castle County and one of the major cities in the Delaware Valley metropolitan area. Wilmington was named by Proprietor Thomas Penn after his friend Spencer Compton, Earl of Wilmington, who was prime minister in the reign of George II of Great Britain. As of the 2017 United States Census
United States Census
estimate, the city's population is 72,846.[7] It is the fifth least populous city in the U.S. to be the most populous in its state
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Delaware
Delaware
Delaware
(/ˈdɛləwɛər/ ( listen))[10] is one of the 50 states of the United States, located in the Mid-Atlantic or Northeastern region.[a] It is bordered to the south and west by Maryland, to the north by Pennsylvania, and to the east by New Jersey and the Atlantic Ocean. The state takes its name from Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr, an English nobleman and Virginia's first colonial governor.[11] Delaware
Delaware
occupies the northeastern portion of the Delmarva Peninsula. It is the second smallest and sixth least populous state, but the sixth most densely populated. Delaware
Delaware
is divided into three counties, the lowest number of any state. From north to south, they are New Castle County, Kent County, and Sussex
Sussex
County
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Senior Status
Senior status is a form of semi-retirement for United States federal judges, and judges in some state court systems. A judge must be at least 65 years of age and have served in federal courts for 15 years to qualify, with one less year of service required for each additional year of age. When that happens, they receive the full salary of a judge but have the option to take a reduced caseload, although many senior judges choose to continue to work full-time. Additionally, senior judges do not occupy seats; instead, their seats become vacant, and the President may appoint new full-time judges to fill their spots. Depending on how heavy a caseload they carry, senior judges remain entitled to maintain a staffed office, including a secretary and one or more law clerks
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Case Citation
Case citation
Case citation
is a system used by legal professionals to identify past court case decisions, either in series of books called reporters or law reports, or in a neutral style that identifies a decision regardless of where it is reported
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