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United Reformed Church
The United Reformed
Reformed
Church (URC) is a Christian
Christian
church in the United Kingdom
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List Of Church Of England Dioceses
There are 42 Church of England
England
dioceses,[1] each being an administrative territorial unit governed by a bishop.[2] These cover England, the Isle of Man, the Channel Islands
Channel Islands
and a small part of Wales
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Calvinism
Calvinism
Calvinism
(also called the Reformed tradition, Reformed Christianity, Reformed Protestantism, or the Reformed faith) is a major branch of Protestantism
Protestantism
that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice of John Calvin
John Calvin
and other Reformation-era theologians. Calvinists broke from the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in the 16th century. Calvinists differ from Lutherans on the real presence of Christ
Christ
in the Eucharist, theories of worship, and the use of God's law for believers, among other things.[1][2] As declared in the Westminster and Second Helvetic confessions, the core doctrines are predestination and election
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Uniting Reformed Church In Southern Africa
The Uniting Reformed Church in Southern Africa (Verenigende Gereformeerde Kerk in Suid-Afrika) was formed by the union of the black and coloured Nederduits Gereformeerde Kerk mission churches.Contents1 Main markers in the URCSA'S history 2 Church history 3 Statistics 4 Structure 5 Achterbergh Declaration 6 Doctrine6.1 Creeds 6.2 Confessions7 References 8 External linksMain markers in the URCSA'S history[edit] In 1652 the Dutch formed a halfway station at the Cape, which was approximately halfway between the Netherlands and the Dutch East Indies, and introduced slavery by whites. Various foreign mission organisations started working in South Africa, which led to the formation of a number of denominations amongst those people who otherwise would have been excluded from the main churches, largely over issues of race. This process motivated the Nederduits Gereformeerde Kerk (NGK) in South Africa to start its own independent mission work. In 1857 the NGK s
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Church Of England
The Church of England
England
(C of E) is the state church of England.[3][4][5] The Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
(currently Justin Welby) is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England
England
is also the mother church of the international Anglican
Anglican
Communion
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Moravian Church
The Moravian Church, formally named the Unitas Fratrum
Unitas Fratrum
( Latin
Latin
for "Unity of the Brethren"),[3][4][5] in German known as [Herrnhuter] Brüdergemeine[6] (meaning "Brethren's Congregation from Herrnhut", the place of the Church's renewal in the 18th century), is one of the oldest
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Apostolic Succession
Apostolic succession
Apostolic succession
is the method whereby the ministry of the Christian Church
Christian Church
is held to be derived from the apostles by a continuous succession, which has usually been associated with a claim that the succession is through a series of bishops.[1] This series was seen originally as that of the bishops of a particular see founded by one or more of the apostles. According to historian Justo L. González, apostolic succession is generally understood today as meaning a series of bishops, regardless of see, each consecrated by other bishops, themselves consecrated similarly in a succession going back to the apostles.[2] According to the Joint International Commission for Theological Dialogue Between the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and the Orthodox Church, "apostolic succession" means more than a mere transmission of powers
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Trinity
The Christian doctrine of the Trinity
Trinity
(Latin: Trinitas, lit. 'triad', from trinus, "threefold")[2] holds that God
God
is three consubstantial persons[3] or hypostases[4]—the Father, the Son ( Jesus
Jesus
Christ), and the Holy Spirit—as "one God
God
in three Divine Persons"
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Kirk Session
A session (from the Latin
Latin
word sessio, which means "to sit," as in sitting to deliberate or talk about something; sometimes called consistory or church board) is a body of elected elders governing each local church within presbyterian polity.Contents1 Organization 2 Clerk of Session 3 See also 4 ReferencesOrganization[edit] These groups of elders make decisions for the local parish through a ruling body called the Kirk
Kirk
session (Latin. sessio from sedere "to sit"), sometimes the Session, church session, or (in Continental Reformed
Reformed
usage) consistory. The members of the session are the pastor (Teaching Elder) of that congregation, and the other ruling elders (sometimes called "lay elders"). Elders are ordained for life, so if they are subsequently elected or appointed to Sessions at later points in their life, they are inducted, there being no second ordination
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Church Union
Church union is the name given to a merger of two or more Christian denominations. Such unions may take on many forms, including a united church and a federation.Contents1 United churches 2 Federation 3 The Uniates and the Edinoverie 4 See alsoUnited churches[edit] Main article: United and uniting churches A united church is the result of a merger of churches of various denominations. One of the first of these occurred in 1817, when Lutheran
Lutheran
and Reformed
Reformed
churches in Prussia
Prussia
merged into the Prussian Union. The nineteenth century saw a number of unions between churches of the same tradition. For example, the United Secession Church in Scotland was formed in 1820 by a union of various churches which had seceded from the established Church of Scotland
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Eucharist
The Eucharist
Eucharist
(/ˈjuːkərɪst/; also called Holy Communion or the Lord's Supper, among other names) is a Christian
Christian
rite that is considered a sacrament in most churches and an ordinance in others. According to the New Testament, the rite was instituted by Jesus Christ
Christ
during his Last Supper; giving his disciples bread and wine during the Passover
Passover
meal, Jesus
Jesus
commanded his followers to "do this in memory of me" while referring to the bread as "my body" and the wine as "my blood".[1][2] Through the Eucharistic celebration Christians remember both Christ's sacrifice of himself on the cross and his commission of the apostles at the Last Supper.[3] The elements of the Eucharist, bread (leavened or unleavened) and wine (or grape juice), are consecrated on an altar (or table) and consumed thereafter
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Synod
A synod (/ˈsɪnəd/) is a council of a church, usually convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. The word synod comes from the Greek σύνοδος (sýnodos) meaning "assembly" or "meeting", and it is synonymous with the Latin word concilium meaning "council". Originally, synods were meetings of bishops, and the word is still used in that sense in Catholicism, Oriental Orthodoxy
Oriental Orthodoxy
and Eastern Orthodoxy. In modern usage, the word often refers to the governing body of a particular church, whether its members are meeting or not. It is also sometimes used to refer to a church that is governed by a synod. Sometimes the phrase "general synod" or "general council" refers to an ecumenical council. The word synod also refers to the standing council of high-ranking bishops governing some of the autocephalous Eastern Orthodox churches
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Region Of England
The regions of England, formerly known as the government office regions, are the highest tier of sub-national division in England.[1][2] Between 1994 and 2011, nine regions had officially devolved functions within government. While they no longer fulfill this role, they continue to be used for statistical and some administrative purposes. They define areas (constituencies) for the purposes of elections to the European Parliament. Eurostat
Eurostat
also uses them to demarcate first level Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) regions (" NUTS 1 regions") within the European Union. The regions generally follow the boundaries of the former standard regions, established in the 1940s for statistical purposes. The London
London
region (also known as Greater London) has a directly elected Mayor and Assembly
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Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
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Wales
Wales
Wales
(/ˈweɪlz/ ( listen); Welsh: Cymru [ˈkəmri] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the island of Great Britain.[8] It is bordered by England
England
to the east, the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel
Bristol Channel
to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon
Snowdon
(Yr Wyddfa), its highest summit
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