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Union Carriage
A carriage is a wheeled vehicle for people, usually horse-drawn; litters (palanquins) and sedan chairs are excluded, since they are wheelless vehicles. The carriage is especially designed for private passenger use, though some are also used to transport goods. A public passenger vehicle would not usually be called a carriage – terms for such include stagecoach, charabanc and omnibus. It may be light, smart and fast or heavy, large and comfortable or luxurious. Carriages normally have suspension using leaf springs, elliptical springs (in the 19th century) or leather strapping
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Carriage (other)
Carriage
Carriage
is a wheeled vehicle for carrying people, especially horse-drawn. Carriage
Carriage
may also refer to: Vehicle[edit]Baby carriage (especially in North America), a four-wheeled
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Sightseeing
Tourism
Tourism
is travel for pleasure or business; also the theory and practice of touring, the business of attracting, accommodating, and entertaining tourists, and the business of operating tours.[1] Tourism may be international, or within the traveller's country. The World Tourism
Tourism
Organization defines tourism more generally, in terms which go "beyond the common perception of tourism as being limited to holiday activity only", as people "traveling to and staying in places outside their usual environment for not more than one consecutive year for leisure, business and other purposes".[2] Tourism
Tourism
can be domestic or international, and international tourism has both incoming and outgoing implications on a country's balance of payments
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Beatrix Of Aragon
Beatrice of Naples
Naples
(16 November 1457 – 23 September 1508), also known as Beatrice of Aragon (Hungarian: Aragóniai Beatrix; Italian: Beatrice d'Aragona), was the daughter of Ferdinand I of Naples
Naples
and Isabella of Clermont
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Esztergom
Esztergom
Esztergom
(Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈɛstɛrɡom]  listen (help·info), German: Gran, Slovak: Ostrihom, known by alternative names), is a city in northern Hungary, 46 kilometres (29 miles) northwest of the capital Budapest. It lies in Komárom-Esztergom
Komárom-Esztergom
county, on the right bank of the river Danube, which forms the border with Slovakia
Slovakia
there. Esztergom
Esztergom
was the capital of Hungary
Hungary
from the 10th till the mid-13th century when King Béla IV of Hungary
Hungary
moved the royal seat to Buda. Esztergom
Esztergom
is the seat of the prímás (see Primate) of the Roman Catholic Church in Hungary, and the former seat of the Constitutional Court of Hungary. The city has the Keresztény Múzeum, the largest ecclesiastical collection in Hungary
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Italy
Coordinates: 43°N 12°E / 43°N 12°E / 43; 12Italian Republic Repubblica Italiana  (Italian)FlagEmblemAnthem: Il Canto degli Italiani  (Italian) "The Song of the Italians"Location of  Italy  (dark green) – in Europe  (light green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (light green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Rome 41°54′N 12°29′E / 41.900°N 12.483°E / 41.900; 12.483Official languages ItalianaNative languages see full listReligion83.3% Christians 12.4% irreligious 3.7% Muslims 0.2% Buddhists 0.1% Hindus 0.3% other religions[1]Demonym ItalianGovernment Unitary constitutional parliamentary republic• PresidentSergio Mattarella• Prime MinisterPaolo Gentiloni• President of the SenateElisabetta Casellati•&
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Spring (device)
A spring is an elastic object that stores mechanical energy. Springs are typically made of spring steel. There are many spring designs. In everyday use, the term often refers to coil springs. When a conventional spring, without stiffness variability features, is compressed or stretched from its resting position, it exerts an opposing force approximately proportional to its change in length (this approximation breaks down for larger deflections). The rate or spring constant of a spring is the change in the force it exerts, divided by the change in deflection of the spring. That is, it is the gradient of the force versus deflection curve. An extension or compression spring's rate is expressed in units of force divided by distance, for example or N/m or lbf/in. A torsion spring is a spring that works by twisting; when it is twisted about its axis by an angle, it produces a torque proportional to the angle
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Erasmus Darwin
Erasmus Darwin
Erasmus Darwin
(12 December 1731 – 18 April 1802) was an English physician. One of the key thinkers of the Midlands Enlightenment, he was also a natural philosopher, physiologist, slave-trade abolitionist,[1] inventor and poet. His poems included much natural history, including a statement of evolution and the relatedness of all forms of life. He was a member of the Darwin–Wedgwood family, which includes his grandsons Charles Darwin
Charles Darwin
and Francis Galton
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Ackermann Steering Geometry
Ackermann steering geometry
Ackermann steering geometry
is a geometric arrangement of linkages in the steering of a car or other vehicle designed to solve the problem of wheels on the inside and outside of a turn needing to trace out circles of different radii. It was invented by the German carriage builder Georg Lankensperger
Georg Lankensperger
in Munich in 1817, then patented by his agent in England, Rudolph Ackermann (1764–1834) in 1818 for horse-drawn carriages. Erasmus Darwin may have a prior claim as the inventor dating from 1758.[1]Contents1 Advantages 2 Design and choice of geometry 3 References 4 External linksAdvantages[edit] The intention of Ackermann geometry is to avoid the need for tyres to slip sideways when following the path around a curve.[2] The geometrical solution to this is for all wheels to have their axles arranged as radii of circles with a common centre point
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North America
North America
North America
is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.[3][4] It is bordered to the north by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, and to the southeast by South America
South America
and the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea. North America
North America
covers an area of about 24,709,000 square kilometers (9,540,000 square miles), about 16.5% of the earth's land area and about 4.8% of its total surface
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Naghsh-i Jahan Square
Naqsh-e Jahan Square
Naqsh-e Jahan Square
(Persian: میدان نقش جهان‎ Maidān-e Naqsh-e Jahān; trans: "Image of the World Square"), is a square situated at the center of Isfahan
Isfahan
city, Iran. Constructed between 1598 and 1629, it is now an important historical site, and one of UNESCO's World Heritage Sites. It is 160 metres (520 ft) wide by 560 metres (1,840 ft) long[1] (an area of 89,600 square metres (964,000 sq ft)). It is also referred to as Shah Square or Imam Square.[2] The square is surrounded by buildings from the Safavid era. The Shah Mosque
Shah Mosque
is situated on the south side of this square. On the west side is the Ali Qapu Palace. Sheikh Lotf Allah Mosque
Sheikh Lotf Allah Mosque
is situated on the eastern side of this square and at the northern side Keisaria gate opens into the Isfahan
Isfahan
Grand Bazaar
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Amish
The Amish
Amish
(/ˈɑːmɪʃ/; Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
German: Amisch, German: Amische) are a group of traditionalist Christian church fellowships with Swiss Anabaptist
Anabaptist
origins. They are closely related to, but distinct from, Mennonite
Mennonite
churches. The Amish
Amish
are known for simple living, plain dress, and reluctance to adopt many conveniences of modern technology. The history of the Amish
Amish
church began with a schism in Switzerland within a group of Swiss and Alsatian Anabaptists
Anabaptists
in 1693 led by Jakob Ammann.[2] Those who followed Ammann became known as Amish.[3] In the early 18th century, many Amish
Amish
and Mennonites
Mennonites
immigrated to Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
for a variety of reasons
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Tourism
Tourism
Tourism
is travel for pleasure or business; also the theory and practice of touring, the business of attracting, accommodating, and entertaining tourists, and the business of operating tours.[1] Tourism may be international, or within the traveller's country. The World Tourism
Tourism
Organization defines tourism more generally, in terms which go "beyond the common perception of tourism as being limited to holiday activity only", as people "traveling to and staying in places outside their usual environment for not more than one consecutive year for leisure, business and other purposes".[2] Tourism
Tourism
can be domestic or international, and international tourism has both incoming and outgoing implications on a country's balance of payments
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Bruges
Bruges
Bruges
(/bruːʒ/; Dutch: Brugge [ˈbrʏɣə]; French: Bruges [bʁyːʒ]) is the capital and largest city of the province of West Flanders in the Flemish Region
Flemish Region
of Belgium, in the northwest of the country. The area of the whole city amounts to more than 13,840 hectares, including 1,075 hectares off the coast, at Zeebrugge
Zeebrugge
(from Brugge aan zee[2] meaning " Bruges
Bruges
by the Sea"[3]). The historic city centre is a prominent World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
of UNESCO. It is oval and about 430 hectares in size. The city's total population is 117,073 (1 January 2008),[4] of whom around 20,000 live in the city centre
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Vienna
Vienna
Vienna
(/viˈɛnə/ (listen);[11][12] German: Wien [viːn] (listen)) is the federal capital, largest city and one of nine states of Austria. Vienna
Vienna
is Austria's primate city, with a population of about 1.9 million[3] (2.6 million within the metropolitan area,[6] nearly one third of the country's population), and its cultural, economic, and political centre. It is the 7th-largest city by population within city limits in the European Union
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New Orleans
New Orleans
New Orleans
(/ˈɔːrl(i)ənz, ɔːrˈliːnz/,[4][5] locally /ˈnɔːrlənz/; French: La Nouvelle- Orléans
Orléans
[la nuvɛlɔʁleɑ̃] ( listen)) is a major United States
United States
port and the largest city and metropolitan area in the state of Louisiana. The population of the city was 343,829 as of the 2010 U.S. Census.[6][7] The New Orleans metropolitan area
New Orleans metropolitan area
(New Orleans–Metairie–Kenner Metropolitan Statistical Area) had a population of 1,167,764 in 2010 and was the 46th largest in the United States.[8] The New Orleans–Metairie–Bogalusa Combined Statistical Area, a larger trading area, had a 2010 population of 1,452,502.[9] Before Hurricane Katrina, Orleans Parish
Orleans Parish
was the most populous parish in Louisiana
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