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Unified Silla
Later Silla
Silla
(668–935, Hangul: 후신라; Hanja: 後新羅; RR: Husilla, Korean pronunciation: [huː.ɕil.la]) or Unified Silla
Silla
(Hangul: 통일신라; Hanja: 統一新羅, Korean pronunciation: [tʰoːŋ.il.ɕil.la]) is the name often applied to the Korean kingdom of Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, after it conquered Baekje
Baekje
and Goguryeo
Goguryeo
in the 7th century, unifying the central and southern regions of the Korean peninsula. Later Silla
Silla
was a prosperous and wealthy country,[2] and its metropolitan capital of Seorabeol
Seorabeol
(modern name Gyeongju)[3] was the fourth-largest city in the world at the time.[4][5][6][7] During its heyday, the country contested with Balhae, a Goguryeo–Mohe kingdom, to the north for supremacy in the region
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Revised Romanization Of Korean
The Revised Romanization of Korean
Romanization of Korean
(국어의 로마자 표기법; gugeoui romaja pyogibeop. op; lit. "Roman-letter notation of the national language") is the official Korean language romanization system in South Korea
South Korea
proclaimed by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism to replace the older McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
system. The new system eliminates diacritics in favor of digraphs and adheres more closely to Korean phonology than to a suggestive rendition of Korean phonetics for non-native speakers. The Revised Romanization limits itself to the ISO basic Latin alphabet, apart from limited, often optional use of the hyphen. It was developed by the National Academy of the Korean Language from 1995 and was released to the public on 7 July 2000 by South Korea's Ministry of Culture and Tourism in Proclamation No
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List Of Countries By Population
This is a list of countries and dependent territories by population. It includes sovereign states, inhabited dependent territories and, in some cases, constituent countries of sovereign states, with inclusion within the list being primarily based on the ISO standard ISO 3166-1. For instance, the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
is considered as a single entity while the constituent countries of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
Kingdom of the Netherlands
are considered separately. In addition, this list includes certain states with limited recognition not found in ISO 3166-1. The population figures do not reflect the practice of countries that report significantly different populations of citizens domestically and overall
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McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
romanization (/məˈkuːn ˈraɪʃaʊ.ər/) is one of the two most widely used Korean language
Korean language
romanization systems. A modified version of McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
was the official romanization system in South Korea
South Korea
until 2000, when it was replaced by the Revised Romanization of Korean
Romanization of Korean
system. A variant of McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
is still used as the official system in North Korea.[citation needed] The system was created in 1937 by George M. McCune and Edwin O. Reischauer
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Hanja
Hanja
Hanja
(Hangul: 한자; Hanja: 漢字; Korean pronunciation: [ha(ː)nt͈ɕa]) is the Korean name
Korean name
for Chinese characters (Chinese: 漢字; pinyin: hànzì).[1] More specifically, it refers to those Chinese characters
Chinese characters
borrowed from Chinese and incorporated into the Korean language
Korean language
with Korean pronunciation. Hanja-mal or Hanja-eo (the latter is more used) refers to words that can be written with Hanja, and hanmun (한문, 漢文) refers to Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese
writing, although "Hanja" is sometimes used loosely to encompass these other concepts. Because Hanja
Hanja
never underwent major reform, they are almost entirely identical to traditional Chinese and kyūjitai characters, though the stroke orders for some characters are slightly different
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Hangul
Hangul
Hangul
(/ˈhɑːnˌɡuːl/ HAHN-gool;[1] from Korean hangeul 한글 [ha(ː)n.ɡɯl]) is the Korean alphabet. It has been used to write the Korean language
Korean language
since its creation in the 15th century under Sejong the Great.[2][3] It is the official writing system of South Korea
South Korea
and North Korea. It is a co-official writing system in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County
Changbai Korean Autonomous County
in Jilin
Jilin
Province, China. It is sometimes used to write the Cia-Cia language
Cia-Cia language
spoken near the town of Bau-Bau, Indonesia. The alphabet consists of 19 consonants and 21 vowels. Hangul
Hangul
letters are grouped into syllabic blocks, vertically and horizontally
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Anapji
Donggung Palace and Wolji Pond in Gyeongju (former name is Anapji) is an artificial pond in Gyeongju National Park, South Korea. It was part of the palace complex of ancient Silla (57 BCE - 935 CE). It was constructed by order of King Munmu in 674 CE. The pond is situated at the northeast edge of the Banwolseong palace site, in central Gyeongju. It is an oval shape; 200m from east to west and 180m from north to south. It contains three small islands.[1]Contents1 History 2 Renovation and excavation of relics 3 Tourist destination 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Anapji was originally located near the palace of Silla called Banwolseong. It is written in Samguk Sagi: "During the era of King Munmu, a new pond was made in the palace and flowers and birds flourished in this pond". There is also mention of a royal reception held by King Gyeongsun in 931, when Silla was already crumbling
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Later Three Kingdoms
Kingdom
Kingdom
may refer to:Contents1 Monarchy 2 Taxonomy 3 Arts and media3.1 Television 3.2 Music 3.3 Other media4 People 5 Other 6 See alsoMonarchy[edit] Further information: List of kingdoms A type of monarchy:A realm ruled bya king a queen regnantTaxonomy[edit] Kingdom
Kingdom
(taxonomy), a category in biological taxonomyArts and media[edit] Television[edit] Kingdom
Kingdom
(UK TV series), a 2007 British television drama starring Stephen Fry Kingdom
Kingdom
(U.S
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Monarch
A monarch is a sovereign head of state in a monarchy.[1][2] A monarch may exercise the highest authority and power in the state, or others may wield that power on behalf of the monarch. Typically a monarch either personally inherits the lawful right to exercise the state's sovereign rights (often referred to as the throne or the crown) or is selected by an established process from a family or cohort eligible to provide the nation's monarch. Alternatively, an individual may become monarch by conquest, acclamation or a combination of means
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Buddhism
Buddhism
Buddhism
(/ˈbʊdɪzəm, ˈbuː-/)[1][2] is a religion[3][4] and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism
Buddhism
originated in Ancient India
India
sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, from where it spread through much of Asia, whereafter it declined in India
India
during the Middle Ages. Two major extant branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada
Theravada
(Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana
Mahayana
(Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle")
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Confucianism
Hermeneutic schools:Old TextsNew Text Confucianism Confucianism
Confucianism
by country Confucianism
Confucianism
in IndonesiaKorean ConfucianismJapanese Confucianism
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Taoism
Taoism
Taoism
(/ˈtaʊɪzəm/, also US: /ˈdaʊ-/), also known as Daoism, is a religious or philosophical tradition of Chinese origin which emphasizes living in harmony with the Tao
Tao
(Chinese: 道; pinyin: Dào; literally: "the Way", also romanized as Dao)
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Korean Shamanism
Korean shamanism, also known as Shinism ( Hangul
Hangul
신교, Hanja
Hanja
神敎; Shingyo or Shinkyo, "religion of the spirits/gods"),[1][2] or Shindo (Hangul: 신도; Hanja: 神道, "way of the spirits/gods"),[3][4][note 1] is the collective term for the ethnic religions of
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Monarchy
A monarchy is a form of government in which a group, generally a family representing a dynasty (aristocracy), embodies the country's national identity and its head, the monarch, exercises the role of sovereignty. The actual power of the monarch may vary from purely symbolic (crowned republic), to partial and restricted (constitutional monarchy), to completely autocratic (absolute monarchy). Traditionally the monarch's post is inherited and lasts until death or abdication. In contrast, elective monarchies require the monarch to be elected.[1] Both types have further variations as there are widely divergent structures and traditions defining monarchy. For example, in some[which?] elected monarchies only pedigrees are taken into account for eligibility of the next ruler, whereas many hereditary monarchies impose requirements regarding the religion, age, gender, mental capacity, etc
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Okjeo
Okjeo
Okjeo
(Korean pronunciation: [ok̚.t͈ɕʌ]) was a Korean tribal state which arose in the northern Korean peninsula
Korean peninsula
from perhaps the 2nd century BCE to the 5th century CE. Dong-okjeo (Eastern Okjeo) occupied roughly the area of the Hamgyŏng provinces of North Korea, and Buk-okjeo (Northern Okjeo) occupied the Duman River region. Dong-okjeo was often simply called Okjeo, while Buk-okjeo was also sometimes referred to as Chiguru (置溝婁, 치구루) or Guru (구루),[citation needed] the latter name being also applied to Goguryeo. Okjeo
Okjeo
bordered the other minor state of Dongye
Dongye
on the south, and shared a similar fate.Contents1 History 2 Culture 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesHistory[edit]Proto–Three Kingdoms, c
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Jin (Korean State)
The state of Jin (Korean pronunciation: [tɕin]) was a confederacy of statelets which occupied some portion of the southern Korean peninsula
Korean peninsula
during the 2nd and 3rd centuries BC, bordering the Korean kingdom Gojoseon
Gojoseon
to the north. Its capital was somewhere south of the Han River. It preceded the Samhan
Samhan
confederacies, each of which claimed to be successors of the Jin state.[5]Contents1 Name 2 History 3 Archeology 4 Legacy 5 See also 6 References6.1 Citations 6.2 BibliographyName[edit] "Jin" is the Revised Romanization of Korean
Revised Romanization of Korean
진, originally written 辰 in Korean Chinese characters (hanja). This character's Old Chinese pronunciation has been reconstructed as /*[d]ər/[6] and originally referred to the 5th earthly branch of the Chinese and Korean zodiacs, a division of the orbit of Jupiter identified with the dragon
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