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Umami Burger
Umami
Umami
Burger is an American restaurant chain that specializes in gourmet hamburgers. The name refers to umami (savory) flavor.[1][2] The restaurant was founded by Adam Fleischman, and is part of the Umami
Umami
Restaurant Group. Umami
Umami
Burger has waiter service and most locations have a full bar.[3] Its first restaurant was open in Los Angeles in 2009
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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United States Trademark Law
A trademark is a word, phrase, or logo that identifies the source of goods or services.[1] Trademark
Trademark
law protects a business' commercial identity or brand by discouraging other businesses from adopting a name or logo that is "confusingly similar" to an existing trademark. The goal is to allow consumers to easily identify the producers of goods and services and avoid confusion.[2] United States
United States
trademark law is mainly governed by the Lanham Act. Common law
Common law
trademark rights are acquired automatically when a business uses a name or logo in commerce, and are enforceable in state courts. Marks registered with the U.S
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Fish Sauce
Fish sauce
Fish sauce
is a condiment made from fish coated in salt and fermented for weeks to up to two years.[1] It is used as a staple seasoning in various cuisines in Southeast and East Asia, particularly Indonesian, Burmese, Cambodian, Filipino, Thai, Lao, and Vietnamese cuisines, although it has become embraced globally by chefs and home cooks for its savory umami flavor. Soy sauce
Soy sauce
is the vegetarian answer to fish sauce, and, where soy has not grown well, fish sauce usually takes its place as a salty all-purpose seasoning.[2] Fish sauce
Fish sauce
is added to dishes during the cooking process as well as being used as a base in dipping sauces
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Soy
Glycine
Glycine
max, commonly known as soybean in North America or soya bean,[3] is a species of legume native to East Asia, widely grown for its edible bean which has numerous uses. Fat-free (defatted) soybean meal is a significant and cheap source of protein for animal feeds and many packaged meals. For example, soybean products, such as textured vegetable protein (TVP), are ingredients in many meat and dairy substitutes.[4] The beans contain significant amounts of phytic acid, dietary minerals and B vitamins. Soy vegetable oil, used in food and industrial applications, is another product of processing the soybean crop
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Korean Taco
Korean tacos are a Korean-Mexican fusion dish popular in a number of urban areas in the United States and Canada. Korean tacos originated in Los Angeles,[1] often as street food, consisting of Korean-style fillings, such as bulgogi and kimchi, placed on top of small traditional Mexican corn tortillas
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Hospitality Industry
The hospitality industry is a broad category of fields within the service industry that includes lodging, event planning, theme parks, transportation, cruise line, and additional fields within the tourism industry.[1] The hospitality industry is a multibillion-dollar industry that depends on the availability of leisure time and disposable income. A hospitality unit such as a restaurant, hotel, or an amusement park consists of multiple groups such as facility maintenance and direct operations (servers, housekeepers, porters, kitchen workers, bartenders, management, marketing, and human resources etc.). Usage rate, or its inverse "vacancy rate", is an important variable for the hospitality industry. Just as a factory owner would wish a productive asset to be in use as much as possible (as opposed to having to pay fixed costs while the factory is not producing), so do restaurants, hotels, and theme parks seek to maximize the number of customers they "process" in all sectors
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San Francisco Bay Area
The San Francisco
San Francisco
Bay Area (referred to locally as the Bay Area) is a populous region surrounding the San Francisco, San Pablo and Suisun estuaries in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of California. Although the exact boundaries of the region vary depending on the source, the Bay Area is generally accepted to include the nine counties that border the aforementioned estuaries: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma. Other sources may exclude parts of or even entire counties, or include neighboring counties such as San Benito, San Joaquin, and Santa Cruz. Home to approximately 7.68 million people, Northern California’s nine-county Bay Area contains many cities, towns, airports, and associated regional, state, and national parks, connected by a complex multimodal transportation network
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Liquor License
A liquor license is a permit to sell alcoholic beverages.Contents1 Canada1.1 Alberta 1.2 British Columbia 1.3 Manitoba 1.4 Nova Scotia 1.5 Ontario 1.6 Quebec 1.7 Saskatchewan2 Germany 3 United States3.1 New York 3.2 California 3.3 Texas4 United Kingdom 5 New Zealand 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksCanada[edit] In Canada, liquor licences are issued by the legal authority of each province to allow an individual or business to manufacture or sell alcoholic beverages. Usually several types of liquor licences are available to apply for within each certain province. There are many regulations which apply to all types of liquor licences. For example, each licence must indicate the time, place and the maximum amount of sale. These licences also apply to special events, which may occur outside of the normal setting in which alcohol is served. Licence holders must strictly follow all the terms and rules to avoid suspension, fines for non-compliance or revocation
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East Coast Of The United States
The East Coast
Coast
of the United States
United States
is the coastline along which the Eastern United States
Eastern United States
meets the North Atlantic Ocean. This area is also known as the Eastern Seaboard, the Atlantic Coast
Coast
and the Atlantic Seaboard
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Miami Beach, Florida
Miami
Miami
Beach is a coastal resort city in Miami-Dade County, Florida, United States. It was incorporated on March 26, 1915.[7] The municipality is located on natural and man-made barrier islands between the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
and Biscayne Bay, the latter of which separates the Beach from Miami. The neighborhood of South Beach, comprising the southernmost 2.5 square miles (6.5 km2) of Miami Beach, along with downtown Miami
Miami
and the Port of Miami, collectively form the commercial center of South Florida.[8] As of the 2010 census, Miami
Miami
Beach had a total population of 87,779.[9] It has been one of America's pre-eminent beach resorts since the early 20th century. In 1979, Miami
Miami
Beach's Art Deco
Art Deco
Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places
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Privately Held Company
A privately held company, private company, or close corporation is a business company owned either by non-governmental organizations or by a relatively small number of shareholders or company members which does not offer or trade its company stock (shares) to the general public on the stock market exchanges, but rather the company's stock is offered, owned and traded or exchanged privately. More ambiguous terms for a privately held company are unquoted company and unlisted company. Though less visible than their publicly traded counterparts, private companies have major importance in the world's economy. In 2008, the 441 largest private companies in the United States accounted for US$1,800,000,000,000 in revenues and employed 6.2 million people, according to Forbes. In 2005, using a substantially smaller pool size (22.7%) for comparison, the 339 companies on Forbes' survey of closely held U.S
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Porcini Mushroom
Boletus
Boletus
edulis (English: penny bun, cep, porcino or porcini) is a basidiomycete fungus, and the type species of the genus Boletus. Widely distributed in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
across Europe, Asia, and North America, it does not occur naturally in the Southern Hemisphere, although it has been introduced to southern Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. Several closely related European mushrooms formerly thought to be varieties or forms of B. edulis have been shown using molecular phylogenetic analysis to be distinct species, and others previously classed as separate species are conspecific with this species. The western North American species commonly known as the California
California
king bolete ( Boletus
Boletus
edulis var
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Monosodium Glutamate
Monosodium glutamate
Monosodium glutamate
(MSG, also known as sodium glutamate) is the sodium salt of glutamic acid, one of the most abundant naturally occurring non-essential amino acids.[2] Monosodium glutamate
Monosodium glutamate
is found naturally in tomatoes, cheese and other foods.[3] MSG is used in the food industry as a flavor enhancer with an umami taste that intensifies the meaty, savory flavor of food, as naturally occurring glutamate does in foods such as stews and meat soups.[4][5] It was first prepared in 1908 by Japanese biochemist Kikunae Ikeda, who was trying to isolate and duplicate the savory taste of kombu, an edible seaweed used as a base for many Japanese soups. MSG as a flavor enhancer balances, blends, and rounds the perception of other tastes.[6][7] The U.S
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