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Ueno Park
Ueno Park
Ueno Park
(上野公園, Ueno Kōen) is a spacious public park in the Ueno district of Taitō, Tokyo, Japan. The park was established in 1873 on lands formerly belonging to the temple of Kan'ei-ji. Amongst the country's first public parks, it was founded following the western example as part of the borrowing and assimilation of international practices that characterizes the early Meiji period. The home of a number of major museums, Ueno Park
Ueno Park
is also celebrated in spring for its cherry blossoms and hanami
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Cherry Blossoms
A cherry blossom is the flower of any of several trees of genus Prunus, particularly the Japanese cherry, Prunus
Prunus
serrulata, which is called sakura after the Japanese (桜 or 櫻; さくら).[1][2][3] Currently it is widely distributed, especially in the temperate zone of the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
including Japan, Taiwan, Korea, China, West Siberia, Iran, and Afghanistan.[4][5] Along with the chrysanthemum, the cherry blossom is considered the national flower of Japan.[6] Many of the varieties that have been cultivated for ornamental use do not produce fruit
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Ginkgo Biloba
Ginkgo
Ginkgo
biloba, commonly known as ginkgo or gingko[4] (both pronounced /ˈɡɪŋkoʊ/), also known as the ginkgo tree or the maidenhair tree,[5] is the only living species in the division Ginkgophyta, all others being extinct. It is found in fossils dating back 270 million years. Native to China,[2] the tree is widely cultivated, and was cultivated early in human history. It has various uses in traditional medicine and as a source of food
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National Park
A national park is a park in use for conservation purposes. Often it is a reserve of natural, semi-natural, or developed land that a sovereign state declares or owns. Although individual nations designate their own national parks differently, there is a common idea: the conservation of 'wild nature' for posterity and as a symbol of national pride.[1] An international organization, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and its World Commission on Protected Areas, has defined "National Park" as its Category II type of protected areas. While this type of national park had been proposed previously, the United States established the first "public park or pleasuring-ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people", Yellowstone National Park, in 1872.[2] Although Yellowstone was not officially termed a "national park" in its establishing law, it was always termed such in practice[3] and is widely held to be the first and oldest national park in the world
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Shiba Park
Shiba Park
Shiba Park
(芝公園, Shiba Kōen) is a public park in Minato, Tokyo, Japan
Japan
built around the temple of Zōjō-ji. The park is located between the Minato municipal offices and Tokyo Tower. Many of the footpaths in the park offer excellent views of Tokyo Tower, so the park is a popular spot for dates and appears in many television and film sequences. The Central Labor Relations Commission is located here. Shiba Tōshō-gū
Shiba Tōshō-gū
shrine, an example of Tōshō-gū
Tōshō-gū
architecture, is also located in the park
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Asakusa
Asakusa
Asakusa
(浅草) is a district in Taitō, Tokyo, Japan, famous for the Sensō-ji, a Buddhist temple dedicated to the bodhisattva Kannon. There are several other temples in Asakusa, as well as various festivals, such as the Sanja Matsuri.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Sightseeing and historic sites 4 Food and Drink 5 Carnival 6 Sanja Matsuri 7 See also 8 In Art and Literature 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] The development of Asakusa
Asakusa
as an entertainment district during the Edo period came about in part because of the neighboring district, Kuramae. Kuramae was a district of storehouses for rice, which was then used as payment for servants of the feudal government
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Fukagawa (Tokyo)
In Japan, Fukagawa (深川) may refer to:Fukagawa, Hokkaidō, a city Fukagawa StationFukagawa, Tokyo, a region in Kōtō, Tokyo, formerly Fukagawa ward of Tokyo CityThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Fukagawa. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.See also[edit]<
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Home Ministry (Japan)
The Home Ministry (内務省, Naimu-shō) was a Cabinet-level ministry established under the Meiji Constitution
Meiji Constitution
that managed the internal affairs of Empire of Japan
Japan
from 1873 to 1947
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Ministry Of Agriculture And Commerce
The Ministry of Agriculture and Commerce
Ministry of Agriculture and Commerce
(農商務省, Nōshōmushō) was a cabinet-level ministry in the government of the Empire of Japan from 1881-1925.[1] It was briefly recreated as the Ministry of Agriculture and Commerce (農商省, Nōshōshō) during World War IIContents1 History 2 Ministers of Agriculture and Commerce (Meiji-Taisho) 3 Ministers of Agriculture and Commerce (World War II) 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The original Ministry of Agriculture and Commerce
Ministry of Agriculture and Commerce
was created on April 7, 1881, initially under the Meiji Daijō-kan
Daijō-kan
Cabinet, and then re-established under the Meiji Constitution
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Ministry Of The Imperial Household
The Ministry of the Imperial Household (宮内省, Kunai-shō) was a division of the eighth century Japanese government of the Imperial Court in Kyoto,[1] instituted in the Asuka period
Asuka period
and formalized during the Heian period. The Ministry was reorganized in the Meiji period and existed until 1947, before being replaced by the Imperial Household Agency.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Hierarchy 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesOverview[edit] The needs of the Imperial Household has changed over time
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Hirohito
Hirohito
Hirohito
(裕仁; April 29, 1901 – January 7, 1989) was the 124th Emperor of Japan
Emperor of Japan
according to the traditional order of succession, reigning from December 25, 1926, until his death. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Akihito. In Japan, he is now referred to primarily by his posthumous name, Emperor Shōwa. The word Shōwa is the name of the era that corresponded with the Emperor's reign, and was made the Emperor's own name upon his death
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Emperor Taishō
Emperor Taishō
Emperor Taishō
(大正天皇, Taishō-tennō, 31 August 1879 – 25 December 1926) was the 123rd Emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession, reigning from 30 July 1912 until his death in 1926. The Emperor's personal name was Yoshihito (嘉仁). According to Japanese custom, during the reign the emperor is called the (present) Emperor. After death he is known by a posthumous name that, according to a practice dating to 1912, is the name of the era coinciding with his reign
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Cinnamomum Camphora
Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
camphora (commonly known as camphor tree, camphorwood or camphor laurel) is a large evergreen tree that grows up to 20–30 m (66–98 ft) tall.[1] The leaves have a glossy, waxy appearance and smell of camphor when crushed. In spring, it produces bright green foliage with masses of small white flowers. It produces clusters of black, berry-like fruit around 1 cm (0.39 in) in diameter
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Dajō-kan
The Daijō-kan
Daijō-kan
or Dajō-kan (Japanese: 太政官),[1] also known as the Great Council of State, was (i) (Daijō-kan) the highest organ of Japan's premodern Imperial government under Ritsuryō
Ritsuryō
legal system during and after the Nara period
Nara period
or (ii) (Dajō-kan) the highest organ of Japan's government briefly restored to power after the Meiji Restoration, which was replaced by the Cabinet. It was consolidated in the Taihō Code
Taihō Code
of 702. The Asuka Kiyomihara Code of 689 marks the initial appearance of this central administrative body composed of the three ministers—the Daijō-daijin
Daijō-daijin
(Chancellor), the Sadaijin
Sadaijin
(Minister of the Left) and the Udaijin
Udaijin
(Minister of the Right).[2] The Imperial governing structure was headed by the Daijō-kan
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Zelkova Serrata
Zelkova
Zelkova
serrata (Japanese zelkova, Japanese elm[2] or keyaki; Japanese: 欅 (ケヤキ) keyaki /槻 (ツキ) tsuki; Chinese: 榉树/櫸樹 jǔshù; Korean: 느티나무 neutinamu) is a species of the genus Zelkova
Zelkova
native to Japan, Korea, eastern China
China
and Taiwan.[3][4] It is often grown as an ornamental tree, and used in bonsai. There are two varieties, Zelkova
Zelkova
serrata var. serrata in Japan and mainland eastern Asia, and Zelkova
Zelkova
serrata var
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Prunus Campanulata
Prunus
Prunus
campanulata is a species of cherry native to Japan, Taiwan, southern and eastern China (Guangxi, Guangdong, Hainan, Hunan, Fujian, and Zhejiang), and Vietnam.[4] It is a large shrub or small tree, growing 3–8 m (9.8–26.2 ft) tall.[4] It is widely grown as an ornamental tree, and a symbol of Nago in the Ryukyu Islands
Ryukyu Islands
of Japan. It is variously known in English as the Taiwan cherry,[5] Formosan cherry, or bellflower cherry. It was described in 1883 by Carl Johann Maximowicz.[1]Contents1 Invasive species 2 Ecological interactions 3 Images 4 ReferencesInvasive species[edit] The tree is an invasive plant species in the Northland Region
Northland Region
of New Zealand
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