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Ueckermünde
Ueckermünde
Ueckermünde
(German pronunciation: [ʏkɐˈmʏndə]) is a seaport town in northeast Germany, located in the district of Vorpommern-Greifswald, Western Pomerania, near Germany's border with Poland's Police County. Ueckermünde
Ueckermünde
has a long and varied history, going back to its founding by Slavs, the Ukrani, mentioned in 934 by Widukind of Corvey. The name Ucramund appears in documents from 1178
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Livonia
Livonia
Livonia
(Livonian: Līvõmō, Estonian: Liivimaa, German and Scandinavian languages: Livland, Latvian and Lithuanian: Livonija, Polish: Inflanty, archaic English Livland,[1] Liwlandia; Russian: Лифляндия, translit. Liflyandiya) is a historical region on the eastern shores of the Baltic Sea
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Usedom Abbey
Usedom
Usedom
Abbey (German: Kloster Usedom) was a medieval Premonstratensian monastery on the isle of Usedom
Usedom
(Western Pomerania, Germany) near the town of Usedom
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Lübeck Law
The Lübeck
Lübeck
law (German: Lübisches (Stadt)Recht) was the constitution of a municipal form of government developed at Lübeck, now in Schleswig-Holstein, after it was made a free city in 1226. The law provides for self-government. It replaced the personal rule of tribal monarchs descending from ancient times or the rule of the regional dukes and kings that had been established by Charlemagne. The latter held all of his aristocratic vassals personally responsible for the defence, health and welfare of the tribesmen settled on their estates, including the towns. The Lübeck
Lübeck
Law in theory made the cities to which it applied independent of royalty. Lübeck
Lübeck
set about spreading its form of government to other cities around the Baltic Sea. Eventually about 100 adopted a government based on the law. It still serves as a foundation for German town laws in many of those cities
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Barnim III, Duke Of Pomerania
Barnim III (c. 1300 – August 14, 1368) was a Pomeranian duke from the Griffin dynasty.Contents1 Life 2 Marriage and issue 3 Ancestry 4 See also 5 External linksLife[edit] He ruled Pomerania-Stettin in the years 1344–1368, although he had been a co-regent of his father Otto I since 1320, taking a prominent part in the defence and government of the duchy. Aiming for independence from the Margraviate of Brandenburg, he allied himself with Poland
Poland
and Bohemia. In 1338 Brandenburg relinquished supremacy over Pomerania, and in 1348 Charles IV recognized the duchy as a fiefdom of the Holy Roman Empire, which helped to protect it from the Brandenburg margraves
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Rudolf I, Duke Of Bavaria
Rudolf I of Bavaria, called "the Stammerer" (German: Rudolf der Stammler; 4 October 1274 – 12 August 1319), a member of the Wittelsbach dynasty, was Duke of Bavaria and Count Palatine of the Rhine from 1294 until 1317. Life[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Rudolf was born in Basel, the son of Duke Louis II, Duke of Upper Bavaria and his third wife Matilda of Habsburg, a daughter of King Rudolf I of Germany
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Gothic Art
Gothic art
Gothic art
was a style of medieval art that developed in Northern France out of Romanesque art
Romanesque art
in the 12th century AD, led by the concurrent development of Gothic architecture. It spread to all of Western Europe, and much of Southern and Central Europe, never quite effacing more classical styles in Italy. In the late 14th century, the sophisticated court style of International Gothic
International Gothic
developed, which continued to evolve until the late 15th century. In many areas, especially Germany, Late Gothic art
Gothic art
continued well into the 16th century, before being subsumed into Renaissance
Renaissance
art. Primary media in the Gothic period included sculpture, panel painting, stained glass, fresco and illuminated manuscripts
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Thirty Years' War
Peace of Westphalia Protestant
Protestant
princes allowed to continue religious practices Decline of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church<

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Peace Of Westphalia
The Peace of Westphalia
Westphalia
(German: Westfälischer Friede) was a series of peace treaties signed between May and October 1648 in the Westphalian cities of Osnabrück
Osnabrück
and Münster, effectively ending the European wars of religion. These treaties ended the Thirty Years' War (1618–1648) in the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
between the Habsburgs and their Catholic allies on one side, and the Protestant
Protestant
powers (Sweden, Denmark, Dutch, and Holy Roman principalities) and their Catholic (France) Anti-Habsburg allies on the other. The treaties also ended the Eighty Years' War
Eighty Years' War
(1568–1648) between Spain and the Dutch Republic, with Spain formally recognising the independence of the Dutch Republic
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Queen Of Sweden
This is a list of Swedish monarchs, that is, the Kings and ruling Queens of Sweden, including regents and viceroys of the Kalmar Union, up to the present time.Contents1 History 2 Monarchs and regents of Sweden2.1 House of Munsö 2.2 House of Stenkil
House of Stenkil
and contemporary 2.3 Houses of Sverker and Eric 2.4 House of Bjälbo 2.5 House of Mecklenburg 2.6 Monarchs during the Kalmar Union
Kalmar Union
period and Regents (Riksföreståndare) 2.7 House of Vasa 2.8 House of Palatinate-Zweibrücken, a branch of the House of Wittelsbach 2.9 House of Hesse 2.10 House of Holstein-Gottorp, a branch of the House of Oldenburg 2.11 House of Bernadotte3 Timeline of Swedish monarchs 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Main article: Swedish monarchyKings and Queens Regnant of Sweden
Sweden
1523-1907The earliest record of what is generally considered to be a Swedish king appears in Tacitus' work Germania, c
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Finland
Finland
Finland
(/ˈfɪnlənd/ ( listen); Finnish: Suomi [suo̯mi] ( listen); Swedish: Finland
Finland
[ˈfɪnland]), officially the Republic
Republic
of Finland
Finland
(Finnish: Suomen tasavalta, Swedish: Republiken Finland)[7] is a sovereign state in Northern Europe. The country has land borders with Sweden
Sweden
to the northwest, Norway
Norway
to the north, and Russia
Russia
to the east. To the south is the Gulf of Finland
Finland
with Estonia
Estonia
on the opposite side
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Great Northern War
Coalition victory:Tsardom of Russia
Russia
establishes itself as a new power in Europe. Decline of the Swedish Empire
Swedish Empire
and the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth.Territorial changesTreaty of Nystad: Russia
Russia
gains the three dominions Estonia, Livonia and Ingria
Ingria
as well as parts of Kexholm
Kexholm
and Viborg. Treaties of Stockholm: Prussia gains parts of Swedish Pomerania; Hanover gains Bremen-Verden. Treaty of Frederiksborg: Holstein–Gottorp loses its part of the Duchy of Schleswig
Duchy of Schleswig
to Denmark. Treaty of the Pruth: Azov and area is ceded back to the Ottoman Empire. Russia
Russia
demolishes strategic castles such as Taganrog
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Uckermark
The Uckermark
Uckermark
( German pronunciation (help·info)), a historical region in northeastern Germany, currently[update] straddles the Uckermark
Uckermark
District of Brandenburg
Brandenburg
and the Vorpommern-Greifswald District of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. Its traditional capital is Prenzlau.Contents1 Geography 2 History2.1 Early history 2.2 Ukrani, a Polabian tribe 2.3 Pomerania, Ostsiedlung 2.4 Pomerania
Pomerania
and Brandenburg
Brandenburg
struggle for overlordship 2.5 Brandenburg 2.6 Prussia, and Huguenot settlement 2.7 Post-World War II3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksGeography[edit] The region is named after the Uecker
Uecker
River, which is a tributary of the Oder; the name Uckermark
Uckermark
means "March of the Uecker"
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Thaler
The thaler was a silver coin used throughout Europe for almost four hundred years. Its name lives on in the many currencies called dollar and, until recently, also in the Slovenian tolar. The name "thaler" was used as an abbreviation of "Joachimsthaler", a coin type from the town of Joachimsthal
Joachimsthal
in the Kingdom of Bohemia
Kingdom of Bohemia
(now the Czech Republic), where there were silver mines and the first such coins were minted in 1518. This original Bohemian thaler carried a lion, from the coat of arms of the Kingdom of Bohemia, on its reverse side. Etymologically, Thal (modern: Tal) is German for "valley" – a "thaler" is a person or a thing "from the valley"
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Frederick William I Of Prussia
Frederick William I (German: Friedrich Wilhelm I) (14 August 1688 – 31 May 1740), known as the "Soldier King" (German: Soldatenkönig[1]), was the King in Prussia
King in Prussia
and Elector of Brandenburg
Elector of Brandenburg
from 1713 until his death in 1740 as well as the father of Frederick the Great. He was in personal union the sovereign prince of the principality of Neuchâtel.Contents1 Reign 2 Burial and reburials 3 Relationship with Frederick II 4 Marriage and family 5 Ancestry 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksReign[edit]Portrait of Augustus II of Poland (left) and Frederick William I of Prussia (right), during Frederick William's 1728 visit to Dresden. Painting by Louis de Silvestre, about 1730He was born in Berlin
Berlin
to Frederick I of Prussia
Frederick I of Prussia
and Sophia Charlotte of Hanover
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