HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Ucchusma
Ucchuṣma (Chinese and Japanese phonetic translations: 烏枢沙摩明王, 烏枢瑟摩明王, 烏瑟沙摩明王 or 烏芻沙摩明王, Japanese: Ususama Myōō; Chinese significant name: 除穢金剛 Chúhuì Jīngāng, lit. Vajra purifying the unclean) is a vidyaraja (wisdom king) in the Vajrayana
Vajrayana
sect of Buddhism. He is also known by various other names such as Burning Impurity Kongo, Jusoku Kongo (受触金剛) and Kazu Kongo (火頭金剛). His full name is Great Strength Furious Diamond Ucchuṣma, in Sanskrit
Sanskrit
"Vajra Krodha Mahābala Ucchuṣma", in Chinese 大力威怒金刚烏芻使摩 (Dàlì wēinù jīngāng Wūchúshǐmó), from the Chinese version of the Sūtra of Mahābala and the Tibetan version of the Ārya Mahābala-Nāma-Mahāyāna Sūtra. In Japan, Ucchuṣma is a guardian of the bathroom, where his effigy is often present
[...More...]

"Ucchusma" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Atago Gongen
Atago Gongen (愛宕権現) is a Japanese kami believed to be the local avatar (Gongen) of Buddhist bodhisattva Jizō. The cult originated in Shugendō practices on Mount Atago in Kyoto, and Atago Gongen is worshiped as a protector against fire.[1] There are some nine hundred Atago Shrines around Japan.[2] See also[edit]Gongen Shinbutsu shūgō Honji suijaku Atago Shrine (Kyoto) Atago Shrine (Tokyo)References[edit]^ "Encyclopedia of Shinto - Atago Shinkō". Kokugakuin. Archived from the original on 19 May 2011. Retrieved 7 April 2011.  ^ "Atago Jinja - about". Atago Jinja. Archived from the original on 17 May 2011. Retrieved 7 April 2011. This article related to religion in Japan is a stub
[...More...]

"Atago Gongen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Maitreya
— Events —Death Resurrection Last JudgementJewishMessianismBook of Daniel KabbalahTaoistLi HongZoroastrianFrashokereti SaoshyantInter-religiousEnd times Apocalypticism2012 phenomenonMillenarianism Last Judgment Resurrection
Resurrection
of the deadGog and Magog Messianic Agev t eA statue of the bodhisattva Maitreya, at Kōryū-ji Maitreya
Maitreya
(Sanskrit), Metteyya (Pali), is regarded as a future Buddha of this world in Buddhist eschatology. In some Buddhist literature, such as the Amitabha Sutra
Amitabha Sutra
and the Lotus Sutra, he is referred to as Ajita. According to Buddhist tradition, Maitreya
Maitreya
is a bodhisattva who will appear on Earth in the future, achieve complete enlightenment, and teach the pure dharma
[...More...]

"Maitreya" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ebisu (mythology)
Ebisu (恵比須, 恵比寿, 夷, 戎), also transliterated Webisu (ゑびす, see historical kana orthography) or called Hiruko (蛭子) or Kotoshiro-nushi-no-kami (事代主神), is the Japanese god of fishermen and luck. He is one of the Seven Gods of Fortune
Seven Gods of Fortune
(七福神, Shichifukujin), and the only one of the seven to originate purely from Japan
Japan
without any Hindu or Chinese influence.Contents1 Origins as Hiruko 2 Legend 3 Cultural relevance 4 ReferencesOrigins as Hiruko[edit]Statue of Ebisu in Kesennuma, JapanIn medieval times, Ebisu's origin came to be tied together with that of Hiruko - the first child of Izanagi
Izanagi
and Izanami, born without bones (or, in some stories, without arms and legs) due to his mother's transgression during the marriage ritual
[...More...]

"Ebisu (mythology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Vaisravana
Vaiśravaṇa (Sanskrit) or Vessavaṇa (Pali; Tibetan: རྣམ་ཐོས་སྲས་, Lhasa dialect IPA: Namtösé, simplified Chinese: 多闻天王; traditional Chinese: 多聞天王; pinyin: Duōwén Tiānwáng, Bishamonten (毘沙門天)), is the name of one of the Four Heavenly Kings, and is considered an important figure in Japanese Buddhism.Contents1 Names 2 Characteristics 3 In Theravāda tradition 4 In Japan 5 In Tibet 6 In Thailand 7 See also 8 ReferencesNames[edit] The name Vaiśravaṇa is a vṛddhi derivative (used, e.g., for patronymics) of the Sanskrit proper name Viśravaṇa from the root vi-śru "hear distinctly", (passive) "become famous".[1][original research?] The name Vaiśravaṇa is derived from the Sanskrit viśravaṇa which means "son of Vishrava", a usual epithet of the Hindu god Kubera.[1][2][3][4] Vaiśravaṇa is also known as Kubera and Jambhala in Sanskrit and Kuvera in Pāli.[5][6] Other names include:traditional Chi
[...More...]

"Vaisravana" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Fukurokuju
In Japan, Fukurokuju (福禄寿) (from Japanese fuku, "happiness"; roku, "wealth"; and ju, "longevity") is one of the Seven Lucky Gods in Japanese mythology.[1] It has been theorized that he is a Japanese assimilation of the Chinese Three Star Gods (Fulushou) embodied in one deity. Most related in appearance to the Chinese star god Shou, he is the God of wisdom and longevity. According to some, before attaining divinity, he was a Chinese hermit of the Song Dynasty and a reincarnation of the Taoist god Xuanwu. It is said that during his human incarnation, he was a sennin; a philosopher who could exist without eating food. Fukurokuju probably originated from an old Chinese tale about a mythical Chinese Taoist hermit sage renowned for performing miracles in the Northern Song period (960–1127). In China, this hermit (also known as Jurōjin) was thought to embody the celestial powers of the south polar star
[...More...]

"Fukurokuju" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Juroujin
In Japan, Jurōjin (寿老人) is one of the Seven Gods of Fortune or Shichifukujin, according to Taoist beliefs. He is the God of longevity.[1][2] Jurōjin originated from the Chinese Taoist god, the Old Man of the South Pole. He is known as the immortal of the Northern Song dynasty (960 – 1127), and may have been a historical figure of the period.[2][3] Jurōjin is identified as the personification of the Southern Polar Star.[2] While paintings and statues of Jurōjin are considered auspicious, he never developed a following independent of the other deities Seven Gods of Fortune. Jurōjin is often identified with Fukurokuju, another of the Several Gods of Fortune. In some accounts, the two are said to inhabit the same body.[4] As such, the two are often confused.[5] Jurōjin walks with a staff and a fan
[...More...]

"Juroujin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Brahma (Buddhism)
Brahmā is a leading god (deva) and heavenly king in Buddhism.[1][2] He was adopted from other Indian religions such as Hinduism that considered him a protector of teachings (dharmapala),[3] and he is never depicted in early Buddhist texts as a creator god.[4] In Buddhist tradition, it was the deity Brahma Sahampati[5] who appeared before the Buddha and urged him to teach, once the Buddha attained enlightenment but was unsure if he should teach his insights to anyone.[3] Brahma is a part of the Buddhist cosmology,[2] and lords over the heavenly realm of rebirth called the Brahmaloka[6] – the most sought after realm for afterlife and reincarnation in Buddhist traditions.[7][8][9] Brahma is generally represented in Buddhist culture as a god with four faces and four arms, and variants of him are found in both Theravada and Mahayana Buddhist cultures.[3]Contents1 Origins and nomenclature 2 Classification2.1 Baka Brahmā 2.2 Brahmā Sahampati 2.3 Brahmā Sanatkumāra
[...More...]

"Brahma (Buddhism)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Deities
A deity (/ˈdiːəti/ ( listen) or /ˈdeɪ.əti/ ( listen))[1] is a hypothetical supernatural being considered divine or sacred.[2] The Oxford Dictionary of English defines deity as "a god or goddess (in a polytheistic religion)", or anything revered as divine.[3] C
[...More...]

"Deities" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Yamantaka
Yamāntaka (Sanskrit: यमान्तक Yamāntaka or Vajrabhairava Tibetan: གཤིན་རྗེ་གཤེད་, རྡོ་རྗེ་འཇིགས་བྱེད།, Wylie: gshin rje gshed; rdo rje 'jigs byed; Korean: 대위덕명왕 DaeWiDeokMyeongWang; Japanese: 大威徳明王 Daitokumyōō; Chinese: 大威德金剛; pinyin: Dà Wēidé Jīngāng; Mongolian: Эрлэгийн Жаргагчи Erlig-jin Jarghagchi) is the "lord of death" deity of Vajrayana
Vajrayana
Buddhism.[1] Sometimes he is conceptualized as "conqueror of death".[2] He belongs of the
[...More...]

"Yamantaka" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Avatars
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri NavaratriDurga Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-DussehraRaksha Bandhan Ganesh Chaturthi Vasant Panchami Rama Navami Janmashtami Onam Makar Sankranti Kumbha Mela Pongal Ugadi VaisakhiBihu Puthandu VishuRatha YatraGurus, saints, philosophersAncientAgastya Angiras Aruni Ashtavakra Atri Bharadwaja Gotama Jamadagni Jaimini Kanada Kapila Kashyapa Pāṇini Patanjali Raikva Satyakama Jabala Valmiki Vashistha Vishvamitra Vyasa YajnavalkyaMedievalNayanars Alvars Adi Shank
[...More...]

"Avatars" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vajrayana
New branches:Blue Lotus AssemblyGateway of the Hidden FlowerNew Kadampa BuddhismShambhala BuddhismTrue Awakening TraditionHistoryTantrismMahasiddhaSahajaPursuitBuddhahood BodhisattvaKalachakraPracticesGeneration stage Completion stagePhowaTantric techniques: Fourfold division:KriyayogaCharyayogaYogatantraAnuttarayogatantraTwofold division:Inner TantrasOuter TantrasThought forms and visualisation:MandalaMantraMudraThangkaYantraYoga: Deity
[...More...]

"Vajrayana" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Akasagarbha
Ākāśagarbha Bodhisattva (Sanskrit: Chinese: 虛空藏菩薩; pinyin: Xūkōngzàng Púsà; Japanese pronunciation: Kokūzō Bosatsu; Korean: 허공장보살; romaja: Heogongjang Bosal, Standard Tibetan Namkha'i Nyingpo, Vietnamese Hư Không Tạng Bồ Tát) is a bodhisattva who is associated with the great element (mahābhūta) of space (ākāśa).Contents1 Overview 2 Sutras 3 Mantras 4 References4.1 Bibliography5 External linksOverview[edit]Painting of Ākāśagarbha, Japan, 13th centuryĀkāśagarbha is regarded[who?] as one of the eight great bodhisattvas
[...More...]

"Akasagarbha" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mahapratisara
Mahapratisara (Ch: 大随求菩薩; Jp: Daizuigu) is a Bodhisattva belonging to the Mahayana and Vajrayana sects.[1] She is sometimes presented as the consort of Vairocana.[2] Notes[edit]^ Indian Civilization and Culture by Suhas Chatterjee p.307 [1] ^ Kathmandu Valley painting: the Jucker collection by Hugo Kreijger, Ernst Jucker p.27 [2]v t eBodhisattvasGeneral listAvalokitesvara (Guanyin) Manjushri Samantabhadra Kshitigarbha Maitreya Mahasthamaprapta ĀkāśagarbhaChineseSkanda Sangharama (Guan Yu)VajrayanaPadmasambhava Mandarava Tara Vajrapani Vajrasattva Sitatapatra CundiOtherB. R
[...More...]

"Mahapratisara" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Manjusri
Mañjuśrī is a bodhisattva associated with prajñā (insight) in Mahayana
Mahayana
Buddhism. In Tibetan Buddhism, he is also a yidam. His name means "Gentle Glory" in Sanskrit.[1] Mañjuśrī is also known by the fuller name of Mañjuśrīkumārabhūta,[2] literally "Mañjuśrī, Still a Youth" or, less literally, "Prince Mañjuśrī".Contents1 In Mahāyāna Buddhism 2 Vajrayana
Vajrayana
Buddhism 3 Iconography 4 Mantras 5 In Buddhist cultures5.1 In China 5.2 In Tibet 5.3 In Nepal 5.4 In Japan 5.5 In Indonesia6 Gallery 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksIn Mahāyāna Buddhism[edit] Manjushri
Manjushri
statue
[...More...]

"Manjusri" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Samantabhadra
Samantabhadra
Samantabhadra
(Sanskrit, "Universal Worthy") is a bodhisattva in Mahayana
Mahayana
Buddhism
Buddhism
associated with practice and meditation. Together with Gautama Buddha
Gautama Buddha
and his fellow bodhisattva Mañjuśrī, he forms the Shakyamuni
Shakyamuni
trinity in Buddhism. He is the patron of the Lotus Sutra
Sutra
and, according to the Avatamsaka Sutra, made the ten great vows which are the basis of a bodhisattva. In Chinese Buddhism, Samantabhadra
Samantabhadra
is known as Puxian and is associated with action, whereas Mañjuśrī is associated with prajñā (transcendent wisdom). In Japan, this bodhisattva is often venerated by the Tendai
Tendai
and in Shingon Buddhism, and as the protector of the Lotus Sutra
Lotus Sutra
by Nichiren Buddhism
[...More...]

"Samantabhadra" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.