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USS Kearsarge (BB-5)
USS Kearsarge (BB-5), the lead ship of her class of pre-dreadnought battleships, was a United States Navy
United States Navy
ship, named after the sloop-of-war Kearsarge. Her keel was laid down by the Newport News Shipbuilding Company of Virginia, on 30 June 1896. She was launched on 24 March 1898, sponsored by the wife of Rear Admiral Herbert Winslow, and commissioned on 20 February 1900. Between 1903 and 1907 Kearsarge served in the North Atlantic Fleet, and from 1907 to 1909 she sailed as part of the Great White Fleet. In 1909 she was decommissioned for modernization, which was finished in 1911. In 1915 she served in the Atlantic, and between 1916 and 1919 she served as a training ship. She was converted into a crane ship in 1920, renamed Crane Ship No
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North Atlantic Fleet
The North Atlantic
North Atlantic
Squadron was a section of the United States
United States
Navy operating in the North Atlantic. It was renamed as the North Atlantic Fleet in 1902. In 1905 the European and South Atlantic Squadrons were abolished and absorbed into the North Atlantic
North Atlantic
Fleet. On 1 January 1906, the Navy's Atlantic Fleet was established by combining the North Atlantic Fleet with the South Atlantic Squadron.Contents1 Commanders-in-Chief1.1 North Atlantic
North Atlantic
Squadron 1.2 North Atlantic
North Atlantic
Fleet2 See also 3 External linksCommanders-in-Chief[edit] North Atlantic
North Atlantic
Squadron[edit]Commodore/Rear Admiral James S. Palmer
James S. Palmer
1 November 1865 – 7 December 1867 Rear Admiral Henry K. Hoff
Henry K

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Conning Tower
A conning tower is a raised platform on a ship or submarine, often armored, from which an officer can conn the vessel, i.e., give directions to the helmsman. It is usually located as high on the ship as practical, to give the conning team good visibility of the entirety of the ship itself and of ocean conditions and other vessels. The verb "conn" probably stems from the verb "conduct" rather than from another plausible precedent, the verb "control".[1]Contents1 Surface ships 2 Submarines 3 References 4 External linksSurface ships[edit]USS Michigan with its conning tower visible just above and behind the back of its second forward main gun turret. On top of the conning tower is a stereoscopic rangefinder Conning tower
Conning tower
armoured cylinder of USS Massachusetts during construction.On surface ships, the conning tower was a feature of all battleships and armored cruisers from about 1860 to the early years of World War II
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Lead Ship
The lead ship, name ship, or class leader is the first of a series or class of ships all constructed according to the same general design. The term is applicable to military ships and larger civilian craft.[1][2][3][4]Contents1 Overview 2 Naming 3 References 4 External linksOverview[edit] Large ships are complicated internally and may take as much as five to ten years to construct. Any changes or advances that are available when building a ship are likely to be included, so it is rare to have two that are identical. Constructing one ship is also likely to reveal better ways of doing things and even errors. The second and later ships are often started before the first one is completed, launched and tested. Nevertheless, building copies is still more efficient and cost-effective than building prototypes, and the lead ship will usually be followed by copies with some improvements rather than radically different versions
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USS Kearsarge (1861)
USS Kearsarge, a Mohican-class sloop-of-war, is best known for her defeat of the Confederate commerce raider CSS Alabama during the American Civil War. Kearsarge was the only ship of the United States Navy named for Mount Kearsarge in New Hampshire. Subsequent ships were later named Kearsarge in honor of the ship.[1]Contents1 Hunting Confederate raiders 2 Battle of Cherbourg 3 Home for repairs 4 Post War service 5 Wrecked 6 Popular culture 7 References 8 External linksHunting Confederate raiders[edit] Kearsarge was built at Portsmouth Navy Yard
Portsmouth Navy Yard
in Kittery, Maine, under the 1861 American Civil War
American Civil War
emergency shipbuilding program. The new 1,550 long tons (1,570 t) steam sloop-of-war was launched on 11 September 1861; she was sponsored by Mrs. McFarland, the wife of the editor of the Concord Statement, and was commissioned on 24 January 1862, with Captain Charles W. Pickering in command
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Sloop-of-war
In the 18th century and most of the 19th, a sloop-of-war in the Royal Navy was a warship with a single gun deck that carried up to eighteen guns. The rating system covered all vessels with 20 guns and above; thus, the term sloop-of-war encompassed all the unrated combat vessels, including the very small gun-brigs and cutters
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Virginia
Virginia
Virginia
(/vərˈdʒɪniə/ ( listen); officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) is a state in the Southeastern[6] and Mid-Atlantic[7] regions of the United States
United States
located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains. Virginia
Virginia
is nicknamed the "Old Dominion" due to its status as the first English colonial possession established in mainland North America,[8] and "Mother of Presidents" because eight U.S. presidents were born there, more than any other state. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains
Blue Ridge Mountains
and the Chesapeake Bay, which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capital of the Commonwealth is Richmond; Virginia Beach
Virginia Beach
is the most populous city, and Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision
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Ship Naming And Launching
Ceremonial ship launching
Ceremonial ship launching
is the process of transferring a vessel to the water. It is a naval tradition in many cultures, dating back thousands of years. It has been observed as a public celebration and a solemn blessing. Ship launching imposes stresses on the ship not met during normal operation, in addition to the size and weight of the vessel, and it represents a considerable engineering challenge as well as a public spectacle
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Ship Commissioning
Ship commissioning
Ship commissioning
is the act or ceremony of placing a ship in active service, and may be regarded as a particular application of the general concepts and practices of project commissioning. The term is most commonly applied to the placing of a warship in active duty with its country's military forces. The ceremonies involved are often rooted in centuries old naval tradition. Ship naming and launching
Ship naming and launching
endow a ship hull with her identity, but many milestones remain before she is completed and considered ready to be designated a commissioned ship. The engineering plant, weapon and electronic systems, galley, and multitudinous other equipment required to transform the new hull into an operating and habitable warship are installed and tested
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Magazine (artillery)
Magazine is the name for an item or place within which ammunition or other explosive material is stored. It is taken originally from the Arabic word "makhāzin" (مخازن), meaning "(gunpowder) magazine or storeroom", via Italian and Middle French.[1] The term is also used for a place where large quantities of ammunition are stored for later distribution, or an ammunition dump. This usage is less common.Contents1 Field magazines 2 Naval magazines 3 Nuclear weapons storage 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksField magazines[edit]A shell hoist within a fixed gun emplacement at Battery Moltke, used to lift ordnance from a room belowIn the early history of tube artillery drawn by horses (and later by mechanized vehicles), ammunition was carried in separate unarmored wagons or vehicles
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Belt Armor
Belt armor
Belt armor
is a layer of heavy metal armor plated onto or within the outer hulls of warships, typically on battleships, battlecruisers and cruisers, and aircraft carriers. The belt armor is designed to prevent projectiles from penetrating to the heart of a warship. When struck by an artillery shell or underwater torpedo, the belt armor either absorbs the impact and explosion with its sheer thickness and strength, or else uses sloping to redirect the projectile and its blast downwards. Typically, the main armor belt covers the warship from its main deck down to some distance below the waterline
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William Sims
William Sowden Sims
William Sowden Sims
(October 15, 1858 – September 25, 1936) was an admiral in the United States
United States
Navy who fought during the late 19th and early 20th centuries to modernize the navy. During World War I
World War I
he commanded all United States
United States
naval forces operating in Europe. He also served twice as president of the Naval War College.Contents1 Career1.1 Gunnery 1.2 First World War 1.3 Attack on Daniels2 Retirement and death 3 Awards3.1 Honours4 Dates of rank 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksCareer[edit] Sims was born to American parents living in Port Hope, Ontario, Canada. He graduated from the United States
United States
Naval Academy in 1880, the beginnings of an era of naval reform and greater professionalization. Commodore Stephen B
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Scrap
Scrap
Scrap
consists of recyclable materials left over from product manufacturing and consumption, such as parts of vehicles, building supplies, and surplus materials
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Length Overall
Length overall
Length overall
(LOA, o/a, o.a. or oa) is the maximum length of a vessel's hull measured parallel to the waterline. This length is important while docking the ship. It is the most commonly used way of expressing the size of a ship, and is also used for calculating the cost of a marina berth[1] (for example, £2.50 per metre LOA). LOA is usually measured on the hull alone.[2] For sailing ships, this may exclude the bowsprit and other fittings added to the hull. This is how some racing boats and tall ships use the term LOA.[3] However, other sources may include bowsprits in LOA.[4][5] Confusingly, LOA has different meanings.[6][7] "Sparred length", "Total length including bowsprit", "Mooring length" and "LOA including bowsprit" are other expressions that might indicate the full length of a sailing ship. Often used to distinguish between the length of a vessel including projections (e.g
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Beam (nautical)
The beam of a ship is its width at the widest point as measured at the ship's nominal waterline. The beam is a bearing projected at right-angles from the fore and aft line, outwards from the widest part of ship
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