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USS Enterprise (CVN-65)
USS Enterprise (CVN-65), formerly CVA(N)-65, is a decommissioned[13] United States Navy
United States Navy
aircraft carrier. She was the world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and the eighth United States naval vessel to bear the name. Like her predecessor of World War II fame, she is nicknamed "Big E". At 1,123 ft (342 m),[6][7] she is the longest naval vessel ever built. Her 93,284-long-ton (94,781 tonnes)[5] displacement ranked her as the 12th-heaviest supercarrier, after the 10 carriers of the Nimitz class and the USS Gerald R. Ford. Enterprise had a crew of some 4,600 service members.[11] The only ship of her class, Enterprise[14] was, at the time of inactivation, the third-oldest commissioned vessel in the United States Navy after the wooden-hulled USS Constitution and USS Pueblo
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William B. Franke
William Birrell Franke (April 15, 1894 – June 30, 1979)[1] was United States Secretary of the Navy
United States Secretary of the Navy
from 1959 to 1961 under Dwight D. Eisenhower. Franke was born in Troy, New York
Troy, New York
and attended Pace College. Franke was instrumental in developing and implementing new, modern technology for the United States Navy, including the use of nuclear-powered warships. He served as Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Financial Management and Comptroller) from 1954 to 1957. He was awarded the Department of Defense's Distinguished Service Award and the Medal of Freedom for his work. He died in Vermont
Vermont
after complications from gall bladder surgery.Wikimedia Commons has media related to William B
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Cruiser
A cruiser is a type of warship. The term has been in use for several hundred years, and has had different meanings throughout this period. During the Age of Sail, the term cruising referred to certain kinds of missions – independent scouting, commerce protection, or raiding – fulfilled by a frigate or sloop, which were the cruising warships of a fleet. Modern cruisers are generally the largest ships in a fleet after aircraft carriers, and can usually perform several roles. In the middle of the 19th century, cruiser came to be a classification for the ships intended for cruising distant waters, commerce raiding, and scouting for the battle fleet
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Chester Nimitz
USS Decatur (DD-5) First Submarine
Submarine
Flotilla USS Plunger (SS-2) USS Snapper (SS-16) USS Narwhal (SS-17) 3rd Submarine
Submarine
Division Atlantic Torpedo Fleet USS Skipjack (SS-24) Atlantic
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Fleet Admiral
An admiral of the fleet or fleet admiral (sometimes also known as admiral of the navy or grand admiral) is a military naval officer of the highest rank. In many nations the rank is reserved for wartime or ceremonial appointments. It is usually a rank above admiral (which is now usually the highest rank in peace-time for officers in active service), and is often held by the most senior admiral of an entire naval service. It is also a generic term for a senior admiral in command of a large group of ships, comprising a fleet or, in some cases, a group of fleets. If actually a rank its name can vary depending on the country. In addition to 'fleet admiral' and 'admiral of the fleet', such rank names include 'admiral of the navy' and 'grand admiral'.[Note 1] It ranks above vice admiral, rear admiral and usually full admiral, and is usually given to a senior admiral commanding multiple fleets as opposed to just one fleet
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Flagship
A flagship is a vessel used by the commanding officer of a group of naval ships, characteristically a flag officer entitled by custom to fly a distinguishing flag. Used more loosely, it is the lead ship in a fleet of vessels, typically the first, largest, fastest, most heavily armed, or best known. Over the years, the term "flagship" has become a metaphor used in industries such as broadcasting, automobiles, airlines, and retailing to refer to their highest profile or most expensive products and locations.Contents1 Naval use 2 Flagship
Flagship
as metaphor2.1 Colleges and universities in the United States 2.2 Retailing 2.3 Broadcasting 2.4 Automobiles 2.5 Conservation3 ReferencesNaval use[edit] In common naval use, the term flagship is fundamentally a temporary designation; the flagship is wherever the admiral's flag is being flown
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San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge
The San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge (known locally as the Bay Bridge or the Emperor Norton Bridge) is a complex of bridges spanning San Francisco Bay in California. As part of Interstate 80 and the direct road between San Francisco and Oakland, it carries about 260,000 vehicles a day on its two decks.[3][4] It has one of the longest spans in the United States. The toll bridge was conceived as early as the gold rush days, but construction did not begin until 1933. Designed by Charles H. Purcell,[6][7] and built by American Bridge Company, it opened on November 12, 1936, six months before the Golden Gate Bridge. It originally carried automobile traffic on its upper deck, and trucks and interurban streetcars on the lower, but after the Key System abandoned rail service, the lower deck was converted to all-road traffic as well
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National Defense Authorization Act For Fiscal Year 2010
The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (H.R. 2647, Pub.L. 111–84, 123 Stat. 2190.) is a law in the United States signed by President Barack Obama on October 28, 2009. As a bill it was H.R. 2647 in the 111th Congress
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LZ 129 Hindenburg
LZ 129 Hindenburg
LZ 129 Hindenburg
(Luftschiff Zeppelin #129; Registration: D-LZ 129) was a large German commercial passenger-carrying rigid airship, the lead ship of the Hindenburg class, the longest class of flying machine and the largest airship by envelope volume.[3] It was designed and built by the Zeppelin Company ( Luftschiffbau Zeppelin
Luftschiffbau Zeppelin
GmbH) on the shores of Lake Constance
Lake Constance
in Friedrichshafen
Friedrichshafen
and was operated by the German Zeppelin Airline Company (Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei). The airship flew from March, 1936 until it was destroyed by fire 14 months later on May 6, 1937 while attempting to land at Lakehurst Naval Air Station in Manchester Township, New Jersey
Manchester Township, New Jersey
at the end of the first North American transatlantic journey of its second season of service with the loss of 36 lives
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Ship Decommissioning
Ship commissioning is the act or ceremony of placing a ship in active service, and may be regarded as a particular application of the general concepts and practices of project commissioning. The term is most commonly applied to the placing of a warship in active duty with its country's military forces. The ceremonies involved are often rooted in centuries old naval tradition. Ship naming and launching endow a ship hull with her identity, but many milestones remain before she is completed and considered ready to be designated a commissioned ship. The engineering plant, weapon and electronic systems, galley, and multitudinous other equipment required to transform the new hull into an operating and habitable warship are installed and tested
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USS Constitution
USS Constitution
USS Constitution
is a wooden-hulled, three-masted heavy frigate of the United States Navy, named by President George Washington
George Washington
after the Constitution of the United States of America. She is the world's oldest commissioned naval vessel still afloat.[Note 1] Constitution was launched in 1797, one of six original frigates authorized for construction by the Naval Act of 1794
Naval Act of 1794
and the third constructed. Joshua Humphreys
Joshua Humphreys
designed the frigates to be the young Navy's capital ships, and so Constitution and her sisters were larger and more heavily armed and built than standard frigates of the period. She was built in the North End of Boston, Massachusetts
Boston, Massachusetts
at Edmund Hartt's shipyard. Her first duties with the newly formed U.S
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Hull (watercraft)
The hull is the watertight body of a ship or boat. Above the hull is the superstructure and/or deckhouse, where present. The line where the hull meets the water surface is called the waterline. The structure of the hull varies depending on the vessel type. In a typical modern steel ship, the structure consists of watertight and non-tight decks, major transverse and watertight (and also sometimes non-tight or longitudinal) members called bulkheads, intermediate members such as girders, stringers and webs, and minor members called ordinary transverse frames, frames, or longitudinals, depending on the structural arrangement. The uppermost continuous deck may be called the "upper deck", "weather deck", "spar deck", "main deck", or simply "deck". The particular name given depends on the context—the type of ship or boat, the arrangement, or even where it sails
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Ship Commissioning
Ship commissioning
Ship commissioning
is the act or ceremony of placing a ship in active service, and may be regarded as a particular application of the general concepts and practices of project commissioning. The term is most commonly applied to the placing of a warship in active duty with its country's military forces. The ceremonies involved are often rooted in centuries old naval tradition. Ship naming and launching
Ship naming and launching
endow a ship hull with her identity, but many milestones remain before she is completed and considered ready to be designated a commissioned ship. The engineering plant, weapon and electronic systems, galley, and multitudinous other equipment required to transform the new hull into an operating and habitable warship are installed and tested
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Empire State Building
The Empire State
Empire State
Building is a 102-story[b] Art Deco
Art Deco
skyscraper in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. Designed by Shreve, Lamb & Harmon and completed in 1931, the building has a roof height of 1,250 feet (380 m) and stands a total of 1,454 feet (443.2 m) tall, including its antenna. Its name is derived from "Empire State", the nickname of New York. As of 2017[update] the building is the 5th-tallest completed skyscraper in the United States
United States
and the 28th-tallest in the world. It is also the 6th-tallest freestanding structure in the Americas. The site of the Empire State
Empire State
Building, located on the west side of Fifth Avenue
Fifth Avenue
between West 33rd and 34th Streets, was originally part of an early 18th century farm
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Tonne
The tonne (/tʌn/ ( listen)) (Non-SI unit, symbol: t), commonly referred to as the metric ton in the United States, is a non-SI metric unit of mass equal to 1,000 kilograms;[1][2][3][4] or one megagram (Mg); it is equivalent to approximately 2,204.6 pounds,[5] 1.102 short tons (US) or 0.984 long tons (imperial). Although not part of the SI, the tonne is accepted for use with SI units and prefixes by the International Committee for Weights and Measures.[6]Contents1 Symbol and abbreviations 2 Origin and spelling 3 Conversions 4 Derived units 5 Alternative usage5.1 Use of mass as proxy for energy 5.2 Unit of force6 See also 7 Notes and references 8 External linksSymbol and abbreviations[edit] The SI symbol for the tonne is "t", adopted at the same time as the unit in 1879.[2] Its use is also official for the metric ton in the United States, having been adopted by the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology.[7] It
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RIM-2 Terrier
The Convair
Convair
RIM-2 Terrier
RIM-2 Terrier
was a two-stage medium-range naval surface-to-air missile (SAM), and was among the earliest surface-to-air missiles to equip United States Navy
United States Navy
ships
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