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USCG Org Chart
A chart is a graphical representation of data, in which "the data is represented by symbols, such as bars in a bar chart, lines in a line chart, or slices in a pie chart".[1] A chart can represent tabular numeric data, functions or some kinds of qualitative structure and provides different info. The term "chart" as a graphical representation of data has multiple meanings:A data chart is a type of diagram or graph, that organizes and represents a set of numerical or qualitative data. Maps that are adorned with extra information (map surround) for a specific purpose are often known as charts, such as a nautical chart or aeronautical chart, typically spread over several map sheets. Other domain specific constructs are sometimes called charts, such as the chord chart in music notation or a record chart for album popularity.Charts are often used to ease understanding of large quantities of data and the relationships between parts of the data
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Chart (other)
A chart is a graphical representation of data. Chart
Chart
may also refer to:A specific type of map, for example:Aeronautical chart, a representation of airspace and ground features relevant to aviation Nautical chart, a representation of a maritime area and adjacent coastal regionsan Old English word for rough ground Chart
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Kagi Chart
The Kagi chart is a chart used for tracking price movements and to make decisions on purchasing stock. It differs from traditional stock charts such as the Candlestick chart
Candlestick chart
by being mostly independent of time. This feature aids in producing a chart that reduces random noise. Due to its effectiveness in showing a clear path of price movements, the Kagi chart is one of the various charts that investors use to make better decisions about stocks
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Pedigree Chart
A pedigree chart is a diagram that shows the occurrence and appearance or phenotypes of a particular gene or organism and its ancestors from one generation to the next,[1][2][3] most commonly humans, show dogs,[4] and race horses. The word pedigree is a corruption of the French "pied de grue" or crane's foot, because the typical lines and split lines (each split leading to different offspring of the one parent line) resemble the thin leg and foot of a crane.Contents1 Properties 2 In human use 3 In animal husbandry 4 See also 5 ReferencesProperties[edit] A Pedigree results in the presentation of family information in the form of an easily readable chart. Pedigrees use a standardized set of symbols, squares represent males and circles represent females. Pedigree construction is a family history, and details about an earlier generation may be uncertain as memories fade. If the sex of the person is unknown a diamond is used
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Bubble Chart
A bubble chart is a type of chart that displays three dimensions of data. Each entity with its triplet (v1, v2, v3) of associated data is plotted as a disk that expresses two of the vi values through the disk's xy location and the third through its size. Bubble charts can facilitate the understanding of social, economical, medical, and other scientific relationships. Bubble charts can be considered a variation of the scatter plot, in which the data points are replaced with bubbles. As the documentation for Microsoft Office
Microsoft Office
explains, "You can use a bubble chart instead of a scatter chart if your data has three data series that each contain a set of values
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Waterfall Chart
A waterfall chart is a form of data visualization that helps in understanding the cumulative effect of sequentially introduced positive or negative values. These intermediate values can either be time based or category based. The waterfall chart is also known as a flying bricks chart or Mario chart due to the apparent suspension of columns (bricks) in mid-air. Often in finance, it will be referred to as a bridge. Waterfall charts were popularized by the strategic consulting firm McKinsey & Company in its presentations to clients.[1][2] Complexity can be added to waterfall charts with multiple total columns and values that cross the axis. Increments and decrements that are sufficiently extreme can cause the cumulative total to fall above and below the axis at various points
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Radar Chart
A radar chart is a graphical method of displaying multivariate data in the form of a two-dimensional chart of three or more quantitative variables represented on axes starting from the same point. The relative position and angle of the axes is typically uninformative. The radar chart is also known as web chart, spider chart, star chart,[1] star plot, cobweb chart, irregular polygon, polar chart, or Kiviat diagram[2][3]. It is equivalent to a parallel coordinates plot in polar coordinates.Contents1 Overview 2 Applications 3 Limitations3.1 Artificial structure 3.2 Data
Data
set size4 Example 5 Alternatives 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksOverview[edit] The radar chart is a chart and/or plot that consists of a sequence of equi-angular spokes, called radii, with each spoke representing one of the variables
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Treemapping
In information visualization and computing, treemapping is a method for displaying hierarchical data using nested figures, usually rectangles.Contents1 Main idea 2 Tiling algorithms 3 Rectangular treemaps 4 Convex treemaps4.1 Orthoconvex
Orthoconvex
treemaps5 Other treemaps 6 History 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksMain idea[edit] Treemaps display hierarchical (tree-structured) data as a set of nested rectangles. Each branch of the tree is given a rectangle, which is then tiled with smaller rectangles representing sub-branches. A leaf node's rectangle has an area proportional to a specified dimension of the data. Often the leaf nodes are colored to show a separate dimension of the data. When the color and size dimensions are correlated in some way with the tree structure, one can often easily see patterns that would be difficult to spot in other ways, such as if a certain color is particularly relevant
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Streamgraph
A streamgraph, or stream graph, is a type of stacked area graph which is displaced around a central axis, resulting in a flowing, organic shape. Streamgraphs were popularized by Lee Byron[1] and their use in a February 2008 New York Times
New York Times
article on movie box office revenues.[2] References[edit]^ Byron, Lee; Wattenberg, Martin (November–December 2008). "Stacked Graphs – Geometry & Aesthetics". IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics. IEEE Computer Society. 14 (6): 1245–1252. doi:10.1109/TVCG.2008.166. ISSN 1077-2626. PMID 18988970. Retrieved 24 July 2012.  ^ Matthew Bloch; Lee Byron; Shan Carter; Amanda Cox (23 February 2008). "The Ebb and Flow of Movies: Box Office Receipts 1986–2007". The New York Times
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GapChart
In information visualization and computing, Gap Chart
Chart
is a chart for displaying time series data by using non overlapped thick curves. It was invented in 2013 by Fred. Vernier (LIMSI labs at Univ. Paris Sud) and Charles Perin (LIMSI labs at Univ. Paris Sud and AVIZ-INRIA). Jeremy Boy (AVIZ-INRIA) helped them to improve the original design to its current form.Contents1 Main idea 2 Visual attributes 3 Application domains 4 Bibliography 5 External linksMain idea[edit] Gap Chart
Chart
display one thick curve by time series data. At each time step curves display a flat part and a transition part. Flat parts are separated by gaps proportional to data difference. When two or more time series have same value at the same time step they are distinguished by an external method and represented side by side. Transition steps are represented by straight or S shaped link
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Florence Nightingale
Florence
Florence
Nightingale, OM, RRC, DStJ (/ˈflɒrəns ˈnaɪtɪŋɡeɪl/; 12 May 1820 – 13 August 1910) was an English social reformer and statistician, and the founder of modern nursing. Nightingale came to prominence while serving as a manager of nurses trained by her during the Crimean War, where she organised the tending to wounded soldiers.[3] She gave nursing a highly favourable reputation and became an icon of Victorian culture, especially in the persona of "The Lady with the Lamp" making rounds of wounded soldiers at night.[4][5] While recent commentators have asserted Nightingale's achievements in the
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Open-high-low-close Chart
An open-high-low-close chart (also OHLC) is a type of chart typically used to illustrate movements in the price of a financial instrument over time. Each vertical line on the chart shows the price range (the highest and lowest prices) over one unit of time, e.g., one day or one hour. Tick marks project from each side of the line indicating the opening price (e.g., for a daily bar chart this would be the starting price for that day) on the left, and the closing price for that time period on the right
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Candlestick Chart
A candlestick chart (also called Japanese candlestick chart) is a style of financial chart used to describe price movements of a security, derivative, or currency. Each "candlestick" typically shows one day, thus a one-month chart may show the 20 trading days as 20 "candlesticks".[1] Shorter intervals than one day are common on computer charts, longer are possible. It is like a combination of line-chart and a bar-chart: each bar represents all four important pieces of information for that day: The open, the close, the high and the low. Being densely packed with information, they tend to represent trading patterns over short periods of time, often a few days or a few trading sessions.[2] Candlestick charts are most often used in technical analysis of equity and currency price patterns
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Sparkline
A sparkline is a very small line chart, typically drawn without axes or coordinates. It presents the general shape of the variation (typically over time) in some measurement, such as temperature or stock market price, in a simple and highly condensed way. Sparklines are small enough to be embedded in text, or several sparklines may be grouped together as elements of a small multiple. Whereas the typical chart is designed to show as much data as possible, and is set off from the flow of text, sparklines are intended to be succinct, memorable, and located where they are discussed.[citation needed]Contents1 History 2 Usage 3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 Further readingHistory[edit]This is a 1999 screenshot of an implementation of sparklines developed around January 1998. The concept was developed by interaction designer Peter Zelchenko in conversation with programmer Michael Medved, while Medved was developing the QuoteTracker application
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Area Chart
An area chart or area graph displays graphically quantitative data. It is based on the line chart. The area between axis and line are commonly emphasized with colors, textures and hatchings. Commonly one compares with an area chart two or more quantities.Contents1 History 2 Common uses 3 Variations 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] William Playfair
William Playfair
is usually credited with inventing the area charts as well as the line, bar, and pie charts
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Gantt Chart
A Gantt chart
Gantt chart
is a type of bar chart that illustrates a project schedule. Modern Gantt charts also show the dependency relationships between activities and current schedule status.Contents1 Definition 2 Historical development 3 Example 4 Progress Gantt charts 5 Linked Gantt charts 6 See also 7 Citations 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksDefinition[edit] A Gantt chart
Gantt chart
is a type of bar chart[1][2] that illustrates a project schedule.[citation needed] This chart lists the tasks to be performed on the vertical axis, and time intervals on the horizontal axis.[1][3] The width of the horizontal bars in the graph show the duration of each activity.[3][4] Gantt charts illustrate the start and finish dates of the terminal elements and summary elements of a project. Terminal elements and summary elements constitute the work breakdown structure of the project
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