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URL
A Uniform Resource Locator (URL), colloquially termed a web address,[1] is a reference to a web resource that specifies its location on a computer network and a mechanism for retrieving it. A URL is a specific type of Uniform Resource Identifier (URI),[2] although many people use the two terms interchangeably.[3][a] URLs occur most commonly to reference web pages (http), but are also used for file transfer (ftp), email (mailto), database access (JDBC), and many other applications. Most web browsers display the URL of a web page above the page in an address bar
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Roy Fielding
Roy Thomas Fielding (born 1965) is an American computer scientist, one of the principal authors of the HTTP specification and the originator of the Representational State Transfer (REST) architectural style. He is an authority on computer network architecture, and co-founder of the Apache HTTP Server project.[1][2] Fielding works as a Senior Principal Scientist at Adobe Systems in San Jose, California.[3]Contents1 Biography 2 Contributions 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksBiography[edit] In 1965, Fielding was born in Laguna Beach, California
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Folder (computing)
In computing, a directory is a file system cataloging structure which contains references to other computer files, and possibly other directories. On many computers, directories are known as folders, or drawers[1] to provide some relevancy to a workbench or the traditional office file cabinet. Files are organized by storing related files in the same directory. In a hierarchical filesystem (that is, one in which files and directories are organized in a manner that resembles a tree), a directory contained inside another directory is called a subdirectory. The terms parent and child are often used to describe the relationship between a subdirectory and the directory in which it is cataloged, the latter being the parent
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World Wide Web Consortium
ERCIM, France; Keio University/SFC, Japan; Beihang University, China[1] and many other offices around the worldRegion servedWorldwideMembership474 member organizations[2]DirectorTim Berners-LeeStaff62Website www.w3.orgThe World Wide Web
World Wide Web
Consortium
Consortium
(W3C) is the main international standards organization for the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
(abbreviated WWW or W3). Founded and currently led by Tim Berners-Lee, the consortium is made up of member organizations which maintain full-time staff for the purpose of working together in the development of standards for the World Wide Web
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Internationalized Resource Identifier
The Internationalized Resource Identifier (IRI) was defined by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) in 2005 as a new internet standard to extend upon the existing Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) scheme.[1] The new standard was published in RFC 3987. While URIs are limited to a subset of the ASCII character set, IRIs may contain characters from the Universal Character Set (Unicode/ISO 10646), including Chinese or Japanese kanji, Korean, Cyrillic characters, and so forth.Contents1 Syntax 2 Compatibility 3 Advantages 4 Disadvantages 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksSyntax[edit] IRI extend upon URIs by using the Universal Character Set whereas URIs were limited to the ASCII with far fewer characters
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Punycode
Punycode is a representation of Unicode
Unicode
with the limited ASCII character subset used for Internet host names. Using Punycode, host names containing Unicode
Unicode
characters are transcoded to a subset of ASCII
ASCII
consisting of letters, digits, and hyphen, which is called the Letter-Digit-Hyphen (LDH) subset. For example, München (German name for Munich) is encoded as Mnchen-3ya. While the Domain Name System
Domain Name System
(DNS) technically supports arbitrary sequences of octets in domain name labels, the DNS standards recommend the use of the LDH subset of ASCII
ASCII
conventionally used for host names, and require that string comparisons between DNS domain names should be case-insensitive
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Delimiter
A delimiter is a sequence of one or more characters used to specify the boundary between separate, independent regions in plain text or other data streams.[1] An example of a delimiter is the comma character, which acts as a field delimiter in a sequence of comma-separated values. Another example of a delimiter is the time gap used to separate letters and words in the transmission of Morse code. Delimiters represent one of various means to specify boundaries in a data stream
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Dot-decimal Notation
Dot-decimal notation
Dot-decimal notation
is a presentation format for numerical data. It consists of a string of decimal numbers, each pair separated by a full stop (dot). A common use of dot-decimal notation is in information technology where it is a method of writing numbers in octet-grouped base-10 (decimal) numbers separated by dots (full stops). In computer networking, Internet Protocol Version 4 addresses (IPv4 addresses) are commonly written using the quad-dotted notation of four decimal integers, ranging from 0 to 255 each.Contents1 Definition and use 2 IPv4 address 3 See also 4 ReferencesDefinition and use[edit] Dot-decimal notation
Dot-decimal notation
is a presentation format for numerical data expressed as a string of decimal numbers each separated by a full stop
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IPv4
Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
version 4 (IPv4) is the fourth version of the Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(IP). It is one of the core protocols of standards-based internetworking methods in the Internet, and was the first version deployed for production in the ARPANET
ARPANET
in 1983. It still routes most Internet
Internet
traffic today,[1] despite the ongoing deployment of a successor protocol, IPv6. IPv4
IPv4
is described in IETF
IETF
publication RFC 791 (September 1981), replacing an earlier definition (RFC 760, January 1980). IPv4
IPv4
is a connectionless protocol for use on packet-switched networks. It operates on a best effort delivery model, in that it does not guarantee delivery, nor does it assure proper sequencing or avoidance of duplicate delivery
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IP Address
An Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
address (IP address) is a numerical label assigned to each device connected to a computer network that uses the Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
for communication.[1] An
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Password
A password is a word or string of characters used for user authentication to prove identity or access approval to gain access to a resource (example: an access code is a type of password), which is to be kept secret from those not allowed access. The use of passwords is known to be ancient. Sentries would challenge those wishing to enter an area or approaching it to supply a password or watchword, and would only allow a person or group to pass if they knew the password. In modern times, user names and passwords are commonly used by people during a log in process that controls access to protected computer operating systems, mobile phones, cable TV decoders, automated teller machines (ATMs), etc
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Authentication
Authentication
Authentication
(from Greek: αὐθεντικός authentikos, "real, genuine", from αὐθέντης authentes, "author") is the act of confirming the truth of an attribute of a single piece of data claimed true by an entity. In contrast with identification, which refers to the act of stating or otherwise indicating a claim purportedly attesting to a person or thing's identity, authentication is the process of actually confirming that identity. It might involve confirming the identity of a person by validating their identity documents, verifying the authenticity of a website with a digital certificate,[1] determining the age of an artifact by carbon dating, or ensuring that a product is what its packaging and labeling claim to be
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Internet Assigned Numbers Authority
The Internet
Internet
Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) is a department of ICANN, a nonprofit private American corporation that oversees global IP address
IP address
allocation, autonomous system number allocation, root zone management in the
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User Name
A user is a person who uses a computer or network service. Users generally use a system or a software product[1] without the technical expertise required to fully understand it.[1] Power users use advanced features of programs, though they are not necessarily capable of computer programming and system administration.[2][3] A user often has a user account and is identified to the system by a username (or user name). Other terms for username include login name, screenname (or screen name), nickname (or nick) and handle, which is derived from the identical Citizen's Band radio term. Some software products provide services to other systems and have no direct end users.Contents1 End user 2 User account2.1 Username format3 Terminology 4 See also 5 ReferencesEnd user[edit] See also: End user End users are the ultimate human users (also referred to as operators) of a software product
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Birds Of A Feather (computing)
In computing, BoF (birds of a feather) can refer to:An informal discussion group. Unlike special interest groups or working groups, BoFs are informal and often formed in an ad hoc manner
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