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UDP Port
This is a list of TCP and UDP port numbers used by protocols of the application layer of the Internet protocol suite
Internet protocol suite
for the establishment of host-to-host connectivity. The Transmission Control Protocol
Transmission Control Protocol
(TCP) and the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) needed only one port for full-duplex, bidirectional traffic. The Stream Control Transmission Protocol
Stream Control Transmission Protocol
(SCTP) and the Datagram Congestion Control Protocol (DCCP) also use port numbers. They usually use port numbers that match the services of the corresponding TCP or UDP implementation, if they exist. The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) is responsible for maintaining the official assignments of port numbers for specific uses.[1] However, many unofficial uses of both well-known and registered port numbers occur in practice
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Application Layer
An application layer is an abstraction layer that specifies the shared communications protocols and interface methods used by hosts in a communications network. The application layer abstraction is used in both of the standard models of computer networking: the Internet Protocol Suite (TCP/IP) and the OSI model. Although both models use the same term for their respective highest level layer, the detailed definitions and purposes are different. In TCP/IP, the application layer contains the communications protocols and interface methods used in process-to-process communications across an Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(IP) computer network. The application layer only standardizes communication and depends upon the underlying transport layer protocols to establish host-to-host data transfer channels and manage the data exchange in a client-server or peer-to-peer networking model
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Domain Name System
The Domain Name System
Domain Name System
(DNS) is a hierarchical decentralized naming system for computers, services, or other resources connected to the Internet
Internet
or a private network. It associates various information with domain names assigned to each of the participating entities. Most prominently, it translates more readily memorized domain names to the numerical IP addresses needed for locating and identifying computer services and devices with the underlying network protocols. By providing a worldwide, distributed directory service, the Domain Name System is an essential component of the functionality on the Internet, that has been in use since 1985. The Domain Name System
Domain Name System
delegates the responsibility of assigning domain names and mapping those names to Internet
Internet
resources by designating authoritative name servers for each domain
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Time Protocol
The Time Protocol is a network protocol in the Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
Suite defined in 1983 in RFC 868 by Jon Postel
Jon Postel
and K. Harrenstein. Its purpose is to provide a site-independent, machine readable date and time. The Time Protocol may be implemented over the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) or the User Datagram Protocol (UDP). A host connects to a server that supports the Time Protocol on port 37. The server then sends the time as a 32-bit unsigned integer in binary format and in network byte order, representing the number of seconds since 00:00 (midnight) 1 January, 1900 GMT, and closes the connection
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Service (systems Architecture)
In the contexts of software architecture, service-orientation and service-oriented architecture, the term service refers to a software functionality or a set of software functionalities (such as the retrieval of specified information or the execution of a set of operations) with a purpose that different clients can reuse for different purposes, together with the policies that should control its usage (based on the identity of the client requesting the service, for example). OASIS defines a service as "a mechanism to enable access to one or more capabilities, where the access is provided using a prescribed interface and is exercised consistent with constraints and policies as specified by the service description".[1] Service engineering[edit] A business analyst, domain expert, and/or enterprise architecture team will develop the organization's service model first by defining the top level business functions
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Host (network)
A network host is a computer or other device connected to a computer network. A network host may offer information resources, services, and applications to users or other nodes on the network. A network host is a network node that is assigned a network address. Computers participating in networks that use the Internet
Internet
protocol suite may also be called IP hosts. Specifically, computers participating in the Internet
Internet
are called Internet
Internet
hosts, sometimes Internet
Internet
nodes. Internet
Internet
hosts and other IP hosts have one or more IP addresses assigned to their network interfaces
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Computer Network
A computer network, or data network, is a digital telecommunications network which allows nodes to share resources. In computer networks, computing devices exchange data with each other using connections between nodes (data links.) These data links are established over cable media such as wires or optic cables, or wireless media such as WiFi. Network computer devices that originate, route and terminate the data are called network nodes.[1] Nodes can include hosts such as personal computers, phones, servers as well as networking hardware. Two such devices can be said to be networked together when one device is able to exchange information with the other device, whether or not they have a direct connection to each other
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WHOIS
WHOIS
WHOIS
(pronounced as the phrase who is) is a query and response protocol that is widely used for querying databases that store the registered users or assignees of an Internet
Internet
resource, such as a domain name, an IP address
IP address
block, or an autonomous system, but is also used for a wider range of other information
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TACACS+
Terminal Access Controller Access-Control System (TACACS, usually pronounced like tack-axe) refers to a family of related protocols handling remote authentication and related services for networked access control through a centralized server. The original TACACS protocol, which dates back to 1984, was used for communicating with an authentication server, common in older UNIX networks; it spawned related protocols:Extended TACACS (XTACACS) is a proprietary extension to TACACS introduced by Cisco Systems
Cisco Systems
in 1990 without backwards compatibility to the original protocol. TACACS and X TACACS both allow a remote access server to communicate with an authentication server in order to determine if the user has access to the network. Terminal Access Controller Access-Control System Plus (TACACS+) is a protocol developed by Cisco and released as an open standard beginning in 1993
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Interface Message Processor
The Interface Message Processor
Interface Message Processor
(IMP) was the packet switching node used to interconnect participant networks to the ARPANET
ARPANET
from the late 1960s to 1989. It was the first generation of gateways, which are known today as routers.[1][2][3] An IMP was a ruggedized Honeywell DDP-516
DDP-516
minicomputer with special-purpose interfaces and software.[4] In later years the IMPs were made from the non-ruggedized Honeywell 316 which could handle two-thirds of the communication traffic at approximately one-half the cost.[5] An IMP requires the connection to a host computer via a special bit-serial interface, defined in BBN Report 1822
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Xerox Network Systems
Xerox
Xerox
Network Systems (XNS) is a computer networking protocol suite developed by Xerox
Xerox
within the Xerox
Xerox
Network Systems Architecture. It provided general purpose network communications, internetwork routing and packet delivery, and higher level functions such as a reliable stream, and remote procedure calls. XNS predated and influenced the development of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) networking model, and was very influential in local area networking designs during the 1980s. It had little impact on TCP/IP, however, which was designed earlier. XNS was developed by the Xerox
Xerox
Systems Development Department in the early 1980s, who were charged with bringing Xerox
Xerox
Parc's research to market. XNS was based on the earlier (and equally influential) PARC Universal Packet (PUP) suite from the late 1970s
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Bootstrap Protocol
The Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) is a computer networking protocol used in Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
networks to automatically assign an IP address
IP address
to network devices from a configuration server. The BOOTP was originally defined in RFC 951. When a computer that is connected to a network is powered up and boots its operating system, the system software broadcasts BOOTP messages onto the network to request an IP address
IP address
assignment. A BOOTP configuration server assigns an IP address
IP address
based on the request from a pool of addresses configured by an administrator. BOOTP is implemented using the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) as transport protocol, port number 67 is used by the (DHCP) server to receive client requests and port number 68 is used by the client to receive (DHCP) server responses
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Secure Copy
Secure copy protocol or SCP is a means of securely transferring computer files between a local host and a remote host or between two remote hosts. It is based on the Secure Shell
Secure Shell
(SSH) protocol.[1] "SCP" commonly refers to both the Secure Copy Protocol and the program itself.[2]Contents1 Secure Copy Protocol1.1 Function 1.2 Remote to remote mode 1.3 Issues using talkative shell profiles2 Secure Copy (remote file copy program) 3 See also 4 ReferencesSecure Copy Protocol[edit] The SCP is a network protocol, based on the BSD
BSD
RCP protocol,[3] which supports file transfers between hosts on a network. SCP uses Secure Shell (SSH) for data transfer and uses the same mechanisms for authentication, thereby ensuring the authenticity and confidentiality of the data in transit
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Gopher (protocol)
The Gopher
Gopher
protocol /ˈɡoʊfər/ is a TCP/IP application layer protocol designed for distributing, searching, and retrieving documents over the Internet. The Gopher
Gopher
protocol was strongly oriented towards a menu-document design and presented an alternative to the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
in its early stages, but ultimately Hypertext
Hypertext
Transfer Protocol (HTTP) became the dominant protocol. The Gopher
Gopher
ecosystem is often regarded as the effective predecessor of the World Wide Web.[1] The protocol was invented by a team led by Mark P. McCahill[2] at the University of Minnesota. It offers some features not natively supported by the Web and imposes a much stronger hierarchy on information stored on it
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NETRJS
Remote job entry is the procedure for sending requests for data processing tasks or 'jobs' to mainframe computers from remote workstations, and by extension the process of receiving the output from such tasks at a remote workstation. The RJE workstation is called a remote because it usually is located some distance from the host computer. The workstation connects to the host through a modem or local area network (LAN). Today this is known as the client–server model, and RJE is an early form of a request–response architecture. The terms Remote Batch, Remote Job System[citation needed] and Remote Job Processing are also used for RJE facilities.Contents1 Examples 2 See also 3 External links 4 ReferencesExamples[edit] Remote Job Entry (RJE) is also the name of an OS/360 component[1] that provided RJE services
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Finger Protocol
In computer networking, the Name/ Finger protocol and the Finger user information protocol are simple network protocols for the exchange of human-oriented status and user information.Contents1 Name/Finger protocol 2 Finger user information protocol 3 Security concerns 4 Application support 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksName/Finger protocol[edit] The Name/Finger protocol, is based on Request for Comments document RFC 742 (December 1977) as an interface to the name and finger programs that provide status reports on a particular computer system or a particular person at network sites. The finger program was written in 1971 by Les Earnest who created the program to solve the need of users who wanted information on other users of the network. Information on who is logged-in was useful to check the availability of a person to meet
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