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U.S. Mint
The United States
United States
Mint produces circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce, as well as controlling the movement of bullion. It does not produce paper money; that responsibility belongs to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. The Mint was created in Philadelphia
Philadelphia
in 1792, and soon joined by other centers, whose coins were identified by their own mint marks. There are currently four active coin-producing mints: Philadelphia, Denver, San Francisco, and West Point.Contents1 History 2 Current facilities2.1 Philadelphia 2.2 Denver 2.3 San Francisco 2.4 West Point 2.5 Fort Knox3 Functions 4 Mintmarks 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]The First US Branch Mint in California is located at 608–619 Commercial Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County. The branch opened on April 3, 1854
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Federal Government Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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Chief Engraver Of The United States Mint
The Chief Engraver of the United States Mint
United States Mint
is the highest staff member at the United States
United States
Mint. The Chief Engraver is the person in charge of coin design and engraving of dies at all four United States
United States
Mints: Philadelphia, Denver, San Francisco and West Point. The position was created by Congress with the Coinage Act of 1792, and placed within the Department of Treasury that produces circulating coinage for the United States. In 1990 after the resignation of Elizabeth Jones, the post of Chief Engraver was left vacant, and in 1996, with Public Law 104-208, was abolished by Congress.[1] On February 3, 2009, Mint Director Edmund C. Moy, appointed John Mercanti to the position of Chief Engraver, with duties and prerogatives determined by the Mints Office of Public Affairs
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Refining
Refining (also perhaps called by the mathematical term affining) is the process of purification of a (1) substance or a (2) form. The term is usually used of a natural resource that is almost in a usable form, but which is more useful in its pure form. For instance, most types of natural petroleum will burn straight from the ground, but it will burn poorly and quickly clog an engine with residues and by-products. The term is broad, and may include more drastic transformations, such as the reduction of ore to metal (for which see Refining (metallurgy)). The refining of liquids is often accomplished by distillation or fractionation; this process is useful, for example, for isolating different fractions of petroleum. Gases can be refined in this way as well, by being cooled and/or compressed until they liquefy
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Treasurer Of The United States
The Treasurer of the United States
Treasurer of the United States
is an official in the United States Department of the Treasury who was originally charged with the receipt and custody of government funds, though many of these functions have been taken over by different bureaus of the Department. Responsibility for oversight of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, the United States Mint, and the United States Savings Bonds Division (now the Savings Bond Marketing Office within the Bureau of the Public Debt) was assigned to the Treasurer in 1981. As of 2002 the Office of the Treasurer underwent a major reorganization
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Legal Tender
Legal tender is a medium of payment recognized by a legal system to be valid for meeting a financial obligation.[1] Paper currency and coins are common forms of legal tender in many countries. Legal tender is variously defined in different jurisdictions. Formally, it is anything which when offered in payment extinguishes the debt. Thus, personal cheques, credit cards, and similar non-cash methods of payment are not usually legal tender. The law does not relieve the debt obligation until payment is tendered. Coins and banknotes are usually defined as legal tender. Some jurisdictions may forbid or restrict payment made other than by legal tender
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David Rittenhouse
David Rittenhouse
David Rittenhouse
(April 8, 1732 – June 26, 1796) was an American astronomer, inventor, clockmaker, mathematician, surveyor, scientific instrument craftsman, and public official. Rittenhouse was a member of the American Philosophical Society
American Philosophical Society
and the first director of the United States
United States
Mint.Contents1 Biography 2 Clubs and societies 3 Family 4 Notable contributions to the United States4.1 Transit of Venus 4.2 Orrery 4.3 United States
United States
Mint 4.4 Additional contributions5 Notable events 6 Jefferson's Notes on Virginia 7 Tributes to David Rittenhouse 8 In popular culture 9 See also 10 References 11 Sources 12 Further reading 13 External linksBiography[edit] David Rittenhouse
David Rittenhouse
was born in a small village within Philadelphia called Rittenhousetown
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Edmund C. Moy
Edmund C. Moy (born September 12, 1957) is an American businessman and former government official. From 2006 to 2011 he served as the 38th Director of the United States
United States
Mint.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Personal life 3 Career 4 References 5 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Born in Detroit, Michigan, on September 12, 1957, Moy was raised in Waukesha, Wisconsin, where he worked in his parents' downtown restaurant while growing up
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Henry Voigt
Henry Voigt or Henry Voight (1738–1814) was a clockmaker, mathematical instrument maker, machine and steam engine builder, and Chief Coiner of the first United States Mint. He operated a wire mill in Reading Pennsylvania and repaired clocks and watches for Thomas Jefferson, who knew him well.[1] In Philadelphia he participated in the development and production of the first practical steamboat with John Fitch that in 1790 that traveled in a commercial operation between 1,300 and 3,000 miles at speeds estimated from 6 to 8 miles per hour.[2] He is credited with some of the first U.S
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Branch Mint
A branch mint is a satellite operation of (usually) a national mint. In many cases it will add a Mint mark
Mint mark
to coins that is different from the one that may be used at the main facility, although each country has different rules that may vary over time. Added letters are shown below for the United States, France, and Switzerland. Because of this difference coins produced at branch mints may be worth more or less to collectors than those from the main one, depending on their mintages.[1]Contents1 United States 2 Great Britain 3 France 4 Canada 5 Switzerland 6 References 7 External linksUnited States[edit] The original and main Mint of the United States Mint, has been located in Philadelphia (P or no letter), since 1793. Its current facility, Philadelphia's fourth, opened in 1969. U.S
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Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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Mint Mark
A mint mark is a letter, symbol or an inscription on a coin indicating the mint where the coin was produced.Contents1 History 2 Mint marks in numismatics 3 Examples 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Mint marks were first developed to locate a problem. If a coin was underweight, or overweight, the mint mark would immediately tell where the coin was minted, and the problem could be located and fixed. Another problem which could occur would be a dishonest mint official debasing the coin, or putting less precious metal in the coin than specified. The first mint marks, called " Magistrate
Magistrate
Marks" were developed by the Greeks, and named the Magistrate
Magistrate
in charge of producing that coin. Debasing a coin, or otherwise tampering with it, was a very serious crime, often punishable by death in many civilizations
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Charlotte, North Carolina
Charlotte /ˈʃɑːrlət/ is the most populous city in the U.S. state of North Carolina. Located in the Piedmont, it is the county seat of Mecklenburg County. In 2016, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated the population was 842,051,[4] making it the 17th-most populous city in the United States. The Charlotte metropolitan area
Charlotte metropolitan area
ranks 22nd-largest in the U.S., and had a 2016 population of 2,474,314.[2] The Charlotte metropolitan area is part of a sixteen-county market region or combined statistical area with a 2016 U.S. Census population estimate of 2,632,249.[5] Between 2004 and 2014, Charlotte was ranked as the country's fastest growing metro area, with 888,000 new residents.[6] Based on U.S. Census data from 2005 to 2015, it tops the 50 largest U.S. cities as the millennial hub.[7] It is the second-largest city in the southeastern United States, just behind Jacksonville, Florida
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North Carolina
As of 2000English 90.70% Spanish 6.18%[2]Demonym North Carolinian (official); Tar Heel
Tar Heel
(colloquial)Capital RaleighLargest city CharlotteLargest metro Charlotte
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Dahlonega, Georgia
The city of Dahlonega is the county seat of Lumpkin County, Georgia, United States.[4] As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 5,242.[5] Dahlonega is located at the north end of the Georgia 400, which connects Dahlonega to Atlanta. It is consistently named as a best place to retire by many different publications.[6] In 1828 Dahlonega was the site of the first major gold rush in the United States. The Dahlonega Gold Museum Historic Site
Dahlonega Gold Museum Historic Site
stands in the middle of the town square, housed in the 1836 Lumpkin County Courthouse. From its steps in 1849, Dahlonega Mint
Dahlonega Mint
assayor Dr. M
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Georgia (U.S. State)
Georgia (/ˈdʒɔːrdʒə/ ( listen) JOR-jə) is a state in the Southeastern United States. It began as a British colony in 1733, the last of the original Thirteen Colonies.[5] Named after King George II of Great Britain,[6] the Province of Georgia
Province of Georgia
covered the area from South Carolina
South Carolina
down to Spanish Florida
Spanish Florida
and New France
New France
along Louisiana (New France), also bordering to the west towards the Mississippi River. Georgia was the fourth state to ratify the United States Constitution, on January 2, 1788.[7] In 1802–1804, western Georgia was split to the Mississippi
Mississippi
Territory, which later split to form Alabama
Alabama
with part of former West Florida
West Florida
in 1819
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