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U.S. Figure Skating Championships
The U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
Championships is a figure skating competition held annually to crown the national champions of the United States. The competition is sanctioned by U.S. Figure Skating. In the U.S. skating community, the event is often referred to informally as "Nationals". Medals are awarded in four disciplines: men's (boys') singles, ladies' (girls') singles, pair skating, and ice dancing in four colors: gold (first), silver (second), bronze (third), and pewter (fourth) on five levels, senior, junior, novice, intermediate, and juvenile. The event is also used to determine the U.S. teams for the World Championships, World Junior Championships, Four Continents Championships, and Winter Olympics, however, U.S
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Cleveland Arena
Cleveland
Cleveland
Arena was an arena in Cleveland, Ohio. It was built and privately financed by local businessman Albert C. Sutphin during the height of the Great Depression in 1937 as a playing site for Sutphin's AHL team, the Cleveland
Cleveland
Barons. The arena was at 3717 Euclid Avenue, and seated 9,900 in the stands and 12,500+ for events such as boxing where floor seating was available.[2] In addition to the Barons, the arena was home to the Cleveland
Cleveland
Rebels of the Basketball Association of America, also owned by Sutphin, for the 1946–47 season, and hosted several games for the Cincinnati Royals of the National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
(NBA), who played more than 35 of their home games there from 1966–1970.[3] The arena and the Barons were purchased by Nick Mileti in 1968
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Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
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U.S. Synchronized Skating Championships
The U.S. Synchronized Skating Championships is an annual synchronized skating competition, sanctioned by U.S. Figure Skating, held to determine the national champions of the United States. It was first held in 1984. Teams who qualify at a Sectional Championship competition compete in eight levels: juvenile, intermediate, novice, junior, senior, collegiate, adult and masters. The top two senior teams then go on to compete at the World Synchronized Skating Championships, while at the Junior level the teams competing at the World Junior Synchronized Skating Championships is predetermined by a Junior World Qualifier competition. The teams competing at the Junior Level at the U.S. Synchronized Skating Championships are competing for international assignment for the next years.Contents1 Name changes 2 Competitive Levels 3 Senior medalists 4 References 5 External linksName changes[edit] When first held in 1984, the competition was called the U.S
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Chattanooga, Tennessee
Chattanooga is a city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Tennessee, with a population of 177,571 in 2016.[4] The fourth-largest Tennessee
Tennessee
city, it is the seat of Hamilton County. Located in southeastern Tennessee, on the Tennessee
Tennessee
River, served by multiple railroads and Interstate highways, Chattanooga is a transit hub
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Lower Peninsula Of Michigan
The Lower Peninsula of Michigan is the southern of the two major landmasses of the U.S. state of Michigan, the other being the Upper Peninsula. It is surrounded by water on all sides except its southern border, which it shares with Indiana and Ohio. Although the Upper Peninsula is commonly referred to as "the U.P." it is fairly uncommon for the Lower Peninsula to be called "the L.P." Because of its recognizable shape, the Lower Peninsula is nicknamed "the mitten", with the eastern region identified as "The Thumb". This has led to several folkloric creation myths for the area, one being that it is a hand print of Paul Bunyan, a giant lumberjack and popular European-American folk character in Michigan
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Upper Peninsula Of Michigan
The Upper Peninsula (UP), also known as Upper Michigan, is the northern of the two major peninsulas that make up the U.S. state of Michigan. The peninsula is bounded on the north by Lake Superior, on the east by the St. Marys River, on the southeast by Lake Michigan
Michigan
and Lake Huron, and on the southwest by Wisconsin. The Upper Peninsula contains 29% of the land area of Michigan
Michigan
but just 3% of its total population. Residents are frequently called Yoopers (derived from "U.P.-ers") and have a strong regional identity. Large numbers of French Canadian, Finnish, Swedish, Cornish, and Italian immigrants came to the Upper Peninsula, especially the Keweenaw Peninsula, to work in the area's mines and lumber industry
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Kansas City
The Kansas
Kansas
City metropolitan area is a 15-county metropolitan area anchored by Kansas
Kansas
City, Missouri, that straddles the border between the U.S. states of Missouri
Missouri
and Kansas. With a population of 2,104,509, it ranks as the second largest metropolitan area with its core in Missouri
Missouri
(after Greater St. Louis). Alongside Kansas
Kansas
City, the area includes a number of other cities and suburbs, the largest being Overland Park, Kansas; Kansas
Kansas
City, Kansas; Olathe, Kansas; and Independence, Missouri; each over 100,000 in population
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Northern California
Northern California, often abbreviated NorCal, is the northern portion of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of California. Spanning the state's northernmost 48 counties[1][2] its main population centers include the San Francisco Bay Area (anchored by the cities of San Jose, San Francisco, and Oakland), the Greater Sacramento
Sacramento
area (anchored by the state capital Sacramento), and the Metropolitan Fresno
Fresno
area (anchored by the city of Fresno)
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Southern California
Southern California
California
(colloquially known as SoCal) is a geographic and cultural region that generally comprises California's 10 southernmost counties.[1][2] The region is traditionally described as eight counties, based on demographics and economic ties: Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, Santa Barbara, and Ventura.[3] The more extensive 10-county definition, which includes Kern and San Luis Obispo counties, is also used and is based on historical political divisions.[1] The 8-county and 10-county definitions are not used for the greater Southern California
California
Megaregion, one of the 11 megaregions of the United States
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New Haven, Connecticut
New Haven
New Haven
(locally /nuː ˈheɪvən/ noo-HAY-vən)[2] is a coastal city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Connecticut. It is located on New Haven Harbor on the northern shore of Long Island Sound
Long Island Sound
in New Haven
New Haven
County, Connecticut, and is part of the New York metropolitan area. With a population of 129,779 as determined by the 2010 United States Census,[3] it is the second-largest city in Connecticut
Connecticut
after Bridgeport
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Broadmoor World Arena
The Broadmoor
The Broadmoor
World Arena was a skating rink and hockey arena located at The Broadmoor
The Broadmoor
Resort & Spa in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Originally an outdoor equestrian center and riding academy, the building was enclosed and converted into an ice arena which opened in January 1938. It was the original home of the Colorado College
Colorado College
Tigers hockey team, as well as the Broadmoor Skating Club, a major force in the figure skating community. The building served as the first home of the NCAA Hockey
Hockey
Championships, hosting the first ten Final Fours (1948-1957) and once more, in 1969. The arena served as host to the International Ice Hockey
Hockey
Federation World Championships in 1962
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Grand Prix Final
The Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final (formerly Champions Series Final), often shortened to Grand Prix Final and abbreviated as GPF, is a senior-level international figure skating competition. Medals are awarded in men's singles, ladies' singles, pair skating, and ice dancing
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Rochester, New York
Rochester (/ˈrɒtʃɪstər, ˈrɒtʃɛstər/) is a city on the southern shore of Lake Ontario
Lake Ontario
in western New York. With a population of 208,880 residents, Rochester is the seat of Monroe County and the third most populous city in New York state, after New York City
New York City
and Buffalo. The metropolitan area has a population of just over 1 million people.[4] Rochester was one of America's first boomtowns, initially due to its flour mills along the Genesee River, and then as a manufacturing hub.[5] Several of the region's universities (notably the University of Rochester and Rochester Institute of Technology) have renowned research programs. Rochester is the site of many important inventions and innovations in consumer products. The Rochester area has been the birthplace to Kodak, Western Union, Bausch & Lomb, Gleason and Xerox, which conduct extensive research and manufacturing of industrial and consumer products
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Rochester War Memorial
Hockey / Lacrosse: 11,215 End stage 180°: 10,877 End stage 270°: 11,352 End stage 360°: 12,428 In the Round: 12,906 General Admission: 14,000 Floor Size: 85' wide x 200' deep Seating Configuration:Floor: 1,600 Lower Bowl: 4,696 Upper Bowl: 6,052 Total Seats: 12,428[1]ConstructionBroke ground February 1, 1953 (1953-02-01)[2]Opened October 18, 1955 (1955-10-18)Renovated 1998Construction cost US$7.5 million ($68.6 million in 2017 dollars[3]) $41 million (1998 renovations) ($64 million in 2017 dollars[3])Architect Leonard A
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Seattle
Seattle
Seattle
(/siˈætəl/ ( listen)) is a seaport city on the west coast of the United States. It is the seat of King County, Washington. With an estimated 713,700 residents as of 2017[update],[3] Seattle
Seattle
is the largest city in both the state of Washington and the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
region of North America. In July 2013, it was the fastest-growing major city in the United States[7] and remained in the Top 5 in May 2015 with an annual growth rate of 2.1%.[8] In July 2016, Seattle
Seattle
was again the fastest-growing major U.S. city, with a 3.1% annual growth rate.[9] The city is situated on an isthmus between Puget Sound
Puget Sound
(an inlet of the Pacific Ocean) and Lake Washington, about 100 miles (160 km) south of the Canada– United States
United States
border
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