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Twerski
Twersky, Twerski, or Tverski is the surname of a pedigree of rebbes in the Chernobyl Hasidic dynasty. It was begun by the Grand Rabbi Menachum Nachum Twerski
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Surname
A surname, family name, or last name is the portion of a personal name that indicates a person's family (or tribe or community, depending on the culture).[1] Depending on the culture all members of a family unit may have identical surnames or there may be variations based on the cultural rules. In the English-speaking world, a surname is commonly referred to as a last name because it is usually placed at the end of a person's full name, after any given names. In many parts of Asia, as well as some parts of Europe
Europe
and Africa, the family name is placed before a person's given name. In most Spanish-speaking and Portuguese-speaking countries, two surnames are commonly used and in some families that claim a connection to nobility even three are used. Surnames have not always existed and today are not universal in all cultures. This tradition has arisen separately in different cultures around the world
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Given Name
A given name (also known as a first name, forename) is a part of a person's personal name.[1] It identifies a specific person, and differentiates that person from the other members of a group (typically a family or clan) who have a common surname. The term given name refers to the fact that the name usually is bestowed upon a person, normally to a child by his or her parents at or close to the time of birth. A Christian
Christian
name, a first name which historically was given at baptism, is now also typically given by the parents at birth. In informal situations, given names are often used in a familiar and friendly manner.[1] In more formal situations, a person's surname is more commonly used—unless a distinction needs to be made between people with the same surname
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Society For Industrial And Applied Mathematics
The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics
Mathematics
(SIAM) is an academic association dedicated to the use of mathematics in industry. SIAM is the world's largest professional association devoted to applied mathematics, and roughly two-thirds of its membership resides within the United States.[3] Founded in 1951,[4] the organization began holding annual national meetings in 1954,[5][6] and now hosts conferences, publishes books and scholarly journals, and engages in lobbying in issues of interest to its membership.[1][7] The focus for the society is applied, computational, and industrial mathematics, and the society often promotes its acronym as "Science and Industry Advance with Mathematics". Members include engineers, scientists, and mathematicians, both those employed in academia and those working in industry
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Joseph B. Keller
Joseph Bishop Keller (July 31, 1923 – September 7, 2016) was an American mathematician who specialized in applied mathematics. He was best known for his work on the "geometrical theory of diffraction" (GTD).[2]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Research 3 Awards and honors 4 Personal life 5 References 6 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Born in Paterson, New Jersey
Paterson, New Jersey
on July 31, 1923, Keller attended Eastside High School, where he was a member of the math team.[3] After earning his undergraduate degree in 1943 at New York University, Keller obtained his PhD in 1948 from NYU under the supervision of Richard Courant. He was a Professor of Mathematics
Mathematics
in the Courant Institute at New York University
New York University
until 1979
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Barbara Tversky
Barbara Tversky is a Professor Emerita of Psychology at Stanford University and a Professor of Psychology and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University.[1][2] Tversky specializes in cognitive psychology. She is a leading authority in the areas of visual-spatial reasoning and collaborative cognition. Tversky's additional research interests include language and communication, comprehension of events and narratives, and the mapping and modeling of cognitive processes. Tversky received a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Michigan in 1963 and a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Michigan in 1969.[3] She has served on the faculty of Stanford University since 1977 and of Teachers College, Columbia University since 2005. Tversky was named a Fellow of the American Psychological Society in 1995, the Cognitive Science Society in 2002, and the Society of Experimental Psychologists in 2004. In 1999, she received the Phi Beta Kappa Excellence in Teaching Award
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Amos Tversky
Amos Nathan Tversky (/ˈæmɒs təˈvɛrski/; Hebrew: עמוס טברסקי‎; March 16, 1937 – June 2, 1996) was a cognitive and mathematical psychologist, a student of cognitive science, a collaborator of Daniel Kahneman, and a figure in the discovery of systematic human cognitive bias and handling of risk. Much of his early work concerned the foundations of measurement. He was co-author of a three-volume treatise, Foundations of Measurement (recently reprinted). His early work with Kahneman focused on the psychology of prediction and probability judgment; later they worked together to develop prospect theory, which aims to explain irrational human economic choices and is considered one of the seminal works of behavioral economics
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Winnipeg
Winnipeg
Winnipeg
(/ˈwɪnɪpɛɡ/ ( listen)) is the capital and largest city of the province of Manitoba
Manitoba
in Canada. It is near the longitudinal centre of North America and is 110 kilometres (70 mi) from the Canada– United States
United States
border.[14] It is also the place of the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers. The city is named after the nearby Lake Winnipeg; the name comes from the Western Cree words for muddy water. The region was a trading centre for aboriginal peoples long before the arrival of Europeans. French traders built the first fort on the site in 1738. A settlement was later founded by the Selkirk settlers of the Red River Colony
Red River Colony
in 1812, the nucleus of which was incorporated as the City of Winnipeg
Winnipeg
in 1873
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Shmuel Abba Twersky
Abba Avraham Shmuel Twersky (1872–1947),[1][a] known as Shmuel Abba Twersky,[3] was a Rebbe of the Makarover Hasidic dynasty
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Maggid
Maggid (Hebrew: מַגִּיד‬), sometimes spelled as magid, is a term used to describe two distinct concepts, the more common one defining a concrete person, and the other defining a celestial entity. The usual meaning is that of a traditional Eastern European Jewish religious itinerant preacher, skilled as a narrator of Torah
Torah
and religious stories. A preacher of the more scholarly sort was called a "darshan", and usually occupied the official position of rabbi
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Rebbe
Rebbe
Rebbe
(Hebrew: רבי‬: /ˈrɛbɛ/ or /ˈrɛbi/[1]) is a Yiddish word derived from the Hebrew word rabbi, which means "master, teacher, or mentor"
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David Twersky (journalist)
David Twersky (February 19, 1950 – July 16, 2010) was a journalist, Zionist activist, and peace advocate in Israel and the United States. He was an editor for The Jewish Daily Forward and The New York Sun and a leader of the American Jewish Congress. Twerksy was born and raised in the Bronx, New York, where he grew up in the left-leaning Sholem Aleichem cooperative housing project. He attended the Ramaz School in Manhattan and was active in the Labor Zionist youth movement Habonim. He attended City College of New York. In 1974, Twersky made aliyah (emigrated to Israel) and helped to re-establish Kibbutz Gezer.[1][2] In Israel, Twersky worked for the Labor Party's international affairs department, where he dealt with the Socialist International. He edited Shdemot, the literary journal of the kibbutz movement, and Spectrum, an English-language political monthly. Twersky served in an artillery unit during the 1982 Lebanon War.[1] Twersky returned to the U.S
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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University Of Illinois At Chicago
The University
University
of Illinois
Illinois
at Chicago
Chicago
(UIC) is a public research university located in Chicago, Illinois, United States. Its campus is in the Near West Side community area, adjacent to the Chicago
Chicago
Loop. The second campus established under the University
University
of Illinois
Illinois
system, UIC is also the largest university in the Chicago
Chicago
area, having approximately 30,000 students[8] enrolled in 15 colleges. UIC operates the largest medical school in the United States with research expenditures exceeding $412 million and consistently ranks in the top 50 U.S. institutions for research expenditures.[9][10][11] In the 2015 U.S
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Applied Mathematics
Applied mathematics
Applied mathematics
is the application of mathematical methods by different fields such as science, engineering, business, computer science, and industry. Thus, applied mathematics is a combination of mathematical science and specialized knowledge. The term "applied mathematics" also describes the professional specialty in which mathematicians work on practical problems by formulating and studying mathematical models. In the past, practical applications have motivated the development of mathematical theories, which then became the subject of study in pure mathematics where abstract concepts are studied for their own sake
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Scattering Theory
In mathematics and physics, scattering theory is a framework for studying and understanding the scattering of waves and particles. Wave scattering corresponds to the collision and scattering of a wave with some material object, for instance sunlight scattered by rain drops to form a rainbow. Scattering
Scattering
also includes the interaction of billiard balls on a table, the Rutherford scattering
Rutherford scattering
(or angle change) of alpha particles by gold nuclei, the Bragg scattering (or diffraction) of electrons and X-rays by a cluster of atoms, and the inelastic scattering of a fission fragment as it traverses a thin foil. More precisely, scattering consists of the study of how solutions of partial differential equations, propagating freely "in the distant past", come together and interact with one another or with a boundary condition, and then propagate away "to the distant future"
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