HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Turgesh
in Anatolia Artuqid dynasty Saltuqid dynasty in Azerbaijan Ahmadili dynasty Ildenizid dynasty in Egypt Tulunid dynasty Ikhshidid dynasty in Fars Salghurid dynasty in The Levant Burid dynasty Zengid dynastyThis box:view talk editThe Türgesh, Turgish or Türgish (Old Turkic: Türügesh,[4] 突騎施/突骑施, Pinyin: tūqíshī, Wade–Giles: t'u-ch'i-shih) were a Turkic tribal confederation of Dulu Turks
Dulu Turks
believed to have descended from the Turuhe tribe situated along the banks of the Tuul River. They emerged as an independent power after the demise of the Western Turkic Khaganate and established a khaganate in 699. The Turgesh
Turgesh
Khaganate lasted until 766 when the Karluks
Karluks
defeated them
[...More...]

"Turgesh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Balasagun
Balasagun
Balasagun
was an ancient Soghdian
Soghdian
city in modern-day Kyrgyzstan, located in the Chuy Valley
Chuy Valley
between Bishkek
Bishkek
and Issyk-Kul Lake. Balasagun
Balasagun
was founded by Soghdians, a people of Iranian origin and the Soghdian
Soghdian
language was still in use in this town until the 11th century.[1] It was the capital of the Kara-Khanid Khanate
Kara-Khanid Khanate
from the 10th century until it was taken by the Kara-Khitan Khanate
Kara-Khitan Khanate
in 1134. It was then captured by the Mongols in 1218. The Mongols called it Gobalik ("pretty city")
[...More...]

"Balasagun" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

First Bulgarian Empire
The First Bulgarian Empire
Bulgarian Empire
(Old Bulgarian: ц︢рьство бл︢гарское, ts'rstvo bl'garskoe) was a medieval Bulgarian state that existed in southeastern Europe
Europe
between the 7th and 11th centuries AD. It was founded circa 681 when Bulgar tribes led by Asparukh moved to the north-eastern Balkans. There they secured Byzantine recognition of their right to settle south of the Danube
Danube
by defeating – possibly with the help of local South Slavic tribes – the Byzantine army led by Constantine IV
[...More...]

"First Bulgarian Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Zengid Dynasty
The Zengid or Zangid dynasty was a Muslim
Muslim
dynasty of Oghuz Turk origin,[1] which ruled parts of the Levant
Levant
and Upper Mesopotamia
Upper Mesopotamia
on behalf of the Seljuk Empire.[2]Contents1 History 2 Zengid rulers2.1 Zengid Atabegs and Emirs of Mosul 2.2 Zengid Emirs of Aleppo 2.3 Zengid Emirs of Damascus 2.4 Zengid Emirs of Sinjar (in Northern Iraq) 2.5 Zengid Emirs of Jazira (in Northern Iraq)3 See also 4 NotesHistory[edit] The dynasty was founded by Imad ad-Din Zengi, who became the Seljuk Atabeg (governor) of Mosul
Mosul
in 1127.[3] He quickly became the chief Turkish potentate in Northern Syria and Iraq, taking Aleppo
Aleppo
from the squabbling Artuqids
Artuqids
in 1128 and capturing the County of Edessa
County of Edessa
from the Crusaders in 1144
[...More...]

"Zengid Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Burid Dynasty
The Burid dynasty
Burid dynasty
was a Turkish Muslim dynasty[1] which ruled over the Emirate
Emirate
of Damascus
Damascus
in the early 12th century.Contents1 History 2 Burid Emirs of Damascus 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The first Burid ruler, Toghtekin,[2] began as a servant to the Seljuk ruler of Damascus, Duqaq. Following Duqaq's death in 1104, he seized the city for himself. The dynasty was named after Toghtekin's son, Taj al-Muluk Buri. The Burids gained recognition from the Abbasid caliphate
Abbasid caliphate
in return for considerable gifts
[...More...]

"Burid Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Saltukids
The Saltukids
Saltukids
or Saltuqids (Modern Turkish: Saltuklu Beyliği ) were a dynasty ruling one of the Anatolian beyliks
Anatolian beyliks
founded after the Battle of Manzikert (1071) and centered on Erzurum. The Saltukids
Saltukids
ruled between 1071 and 1202. The beylik was founded by Emir Saltuk, one of the Turkmen[1] commanders of the Great Seljuk Alp Arslan. The beylik fought frequently against the Georgian Kingdom
Georgian Kingdom
for hegemony of Kars region. Center of the beylig, Erzurum, was occupied by Byzantine Empire between 1077–1079 and was besieged by the Georgian King Giorgi III in 1184
[...More...]

"Saltukids" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Artuqids
The Artquids or Artuqid dynasty (Modern Turkish: Artuklu Beyliği or Artıklılar, sometimes also spelled as Artukid, Ortoqid or Ortokid; Turkish plural: Artukoğulları; Azeri Turkish : Artıqlı) was a Turkmen dynasty[1][2] that ruled in Eastern Anatolia, Northern Syria and Northern Iraq in the eleventh and twelfth centuries. The Artuqid dynasty took its name from its founder, Zaheer-ul-Daulah Artuk Bey, who was of the Döger branch of the Oghuz and ruled one of the Turkmen atabeyliks of the Seljuk Empire. The Artuqid rulers viewed the state as the common property of the dynasty members
[...More...]

"Artuqids" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Golden Horde
The Golden Horde
Golden Horde
(Mongolian: Алтан Орд, Altan Ord; Russian: Золотая Орда, Zolotaya Orda; Tatar: Алтын Урда, Altın Urda) was originally a Mongol
Mongol
and later Turkicized khanate established in the 13th century and originating as the northwestern sector of the Mongol
Mongol
Empire.[6] With the fragmentation of the Mongol Empire
Empire
after 1259 it became a functionally separate khanate. It is also known as the Kipchak Khanate or as the Ulus of Jochi.[7] After the death of Batu Khan
Batu Khan
(the founder of the Golden Horde) in 1255, his dynasty flourished for a full century, until 1359, though the intrigues of Nogai did instigate a partial civil war in the late 1290s. The Horde's military power peaked during the reign of Uzbeg (1312–1341), who adopted Islam
[...More...]

"Golden Horde" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Khalji Dynasty
The Khalji or Khilji[a] dynasty was a Muslim
Muslim
dynasty which ruled large parts of the Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
between 1290 and 1320.[2][3][4] It was founded by Jalal ud din Firuz Khalji
Jalal ud din Firuz Khalji
and became the second dynasty to rule the Delhi
Delhi
Sultanate
Sultanate
of India
[...More...]

"Khalji Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Naimans
The Naiman (Khalkha-Mongolian: Найман/Naiman, "eight") is the name of a tribe originating in Mongolia, nowadays one of the tribes in middle juz of Kazakh nation.Contents1 History 2 Modern Naimans 3 Naiman Hazaras 4 Among Turkic peoples 5 Religion 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] In The Secret History of the Mongols, the Naiman subtribe the "Güchügüd" are mentioned. According to Russian Turkologist Nikolai Aristov's view, the Naiman Khanate's western border reached the Irtysh River and its eastern border reached the Mongolian Tamir River. The Altai Mountains
Altai Mountains
and southern Altai Republic
Altai Republic
were part of the Naiman Khanate.[10] They had diplomatic relations with the Kara-Khitans, and were subservient to them until 1175[11]
[...More...]

"Naimans" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Keraites
The Keraites
Keraites
(also Kerait, Kereit, Khereid ; Mongolian: Хэрэйд) were one of the five dominant Turkic[1] or Turco-Mongol tribal[2][3] confederations (khanates) in the Altai-Sayan region during the 12th century. They had converted to the Church of the East (Nestorianism) in the early 11th century and are one of the possible sources of the European Prester John
Prester John
legend. Their original territory was expansive, corresponding to much of what is now Mongolia
[...More...]

"Keraites" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Karluk Yabgu State
The Karluks
Karluks
and Oguz tribes, whose major Turkic groups settled in the Issyk-Kul
Issyk-Kul
and Talas region. In the 940 Karluk state did not have strong economic ties, Therefore, The Karluk state fell.[1] See also[edit]Oghuz Yabgu State List of Turkic dynasties and countries Turkic peoples Timeline of Turks (500-1300)References[edit]^ "Karluk Yabgu State (756-940)". http://e-history.kz/en/contents/view/309.  External link in website= (help); Missing or empty url= (help)Further reading[edit]History of civilisations of Central Asia. South Asia Books. March 1999. p. 569. ISBN 978-8120815407. The Cambridge History of Early Inner Asia (Vol 1). Cambridge University Press. p. 532. ISBN 978-0521243049.This article related to Central Asian history is a stub
[...More...]

"Karluk Yabgu State" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Old Turkic
Old Turkic (also East Old Turkic, Orkhon Turkic, Old Uyghur) is the earliest attested form of Turkic, found in Göktürk and Uyghur inscriptions dating from about the 7th century to the 13th century. It is the oldest attested member of the Orkhon branch of Turkic, which is extant in the modern Western Yugur language
[...More...]

"Old Turkic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Khan (title)
Khan[b] is a title for a sovereign or a military ruler, used by Mongolians living to the north of China. Khan has equivalent meanings such as "commander", "leader", or "ruler", "king" and "chief". As of 2015[update] khans exist in South Asia, Middle East, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and Turkey. The female alternatives are Khatun and Khanum
[...More...]

"Khan (title)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Turkic Khaganate
The Turkic Khaganate (Old Turkic: 𐰜𐰇𐰛:𐱅𐰇𐰼𐰰 Kök Türük; Chinese: 突厥汗国; pinyin: Tūjué hánguó) or Göktürk Khaganate was a khaganate established by the Ashina clan of the Göktürks
Göktürks
in medieval Inner Asia. Under the leadership of Bumin Qaghan (d. 552) and his sons, the Ashina succeeded the Rouran Khaganate as the hegemonic power of the Mongolian Plateau and rapidly expanded their territories in Central Asia. Initially the Khaganate would use Sogdian in official and numismatic functions.[1][4] It was the first Turkic state to use the name Türk politically and is known for the first written record of any Turkic language in history.[5] The first Turkic Khaganate collapsed in 581, after which followed a series of conflicts and civil wars which separated the polity into the Eastern Turkic Khaganate and Western Turkic Khaganate
[...More...]

"Turkic Khaganate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Second Turkic Khaganate
The Second Turkic Khaganate
Turkic Khaganate
(682-744) was a nomadic confederation or steppe empire in Mongolia. It was preceded by the First Turkic Khaganate (552-630) and then a period of disunion (630-682). It was followed by the Uyghur Kaganate
Uyghur Kaganate
(744-840). During the khaganate Tang dynasty China and the Tibetan Empire
Tibetan Empire
were near their peak and Islam was just beginning to spread into central Asia. Although centered in Mongolia, around 712 it pushed as far west as Samarkand before it was driven back by the Arabs
[...More...]

"Second Turkic Khaganate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.