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Tupelo NBS Monument
A monument is a type of—usually three-dimensional—structure that was explicitly created to commemorate a person or event, or which has become relevant to a social group as a part of their remembrance of historic times or cultural heritage, due to its artistic, historical, political, technical or architectural importance. Examples of monuments include statues, (war) memorials, historical buildings, archeological sites, and cultural assets. If there is a public interest in its preservation, a monument can for example be listed as a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site
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Monument (other)
A monument is a statue, building, or other edifice created to commemorate a person or important event
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New Delhi
New Delhi
Delhi
(/ˈdɛli/ (listen),[4][5] Hindi pronunciation: [nːi dɪlːi]) is an urban district of Delhi which serves as the capital of India
India
and seat of all three branches of the Government of India. The foundation stone of the city was laid by Emperor George V
George V
during the Delhi
Delhi
Durbar of 1911.[6] It was designed by British architects, Sir Edwin Lutyens
Edwin Lutyens
and Sir Herbert Baker. The new capital was inaugurated on 13 February 1931,[7] by Viceroy and Governor-General of India
India
Lord Irwin
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Tumuli
A tumulus (plural tumuli) is a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves. Tumuli are also known as barrows, burial mounds or kurgans, and may be found throughout much of the world. A cairn, which is a mound of stones built for various purposes, may also originally have been a tumulus. Tumuli are often categorised according to their external apparent shape. In this respect, a long barrow is a long tumulus, usually constructed on top of several burials, such as passage graves. A round barrow is a round tumulus, also commonly constructed on top of burials. The internal structure and architecture of both long and round barrows has a broad range, the categorization only refers to the external apparent shape. The method of inhumation may involve a dolmen, a cist, a mortuary enclosure, a mortuary house, or a chamber tomb
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Dolmen
A dolmen (/ˈdɒlmɛn/) is a type of single-chamber megalithic tomb, usually consisting of two or more vertical megaliths supporting a large flat horizontal capstone ("table"), although there are also more complex variants. Most date from the early Neolithic
Neolithic
(4000–3000 BC). Dolmens were typically covered with earth or smaller stones to form a tumulus. In many instances, that covering has weathered away, leaving only the stone "skeleton" of the burial mound intact. It remains unclear when, why, and by whom the earliest dolmens were made. The oldest known dolmens are in Western Europe, where they were set in place around 7,000 years ago. Archaeologists still do not know who erected these dolmens, which makes it difficult to know why they did it. They are generally all regarded as tombs or burial chambers, despite the absence of clear evidence for this
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Pyramid
A pyramid (from Greek: πυραμίς pyramis)[1][2] is a structure whose outer surfaces are triangular and converge to a single point at the top, making the shape roughly a pyramid in the geometric sense. The base of a pyramid can be trilateral, quadrilateral, or any polygon shape. As such, a pyramid has at least three outer triangular surfaces (at least four faces including the base). The square pyramid, with square base and four triangular outer surfaces, is a common version. A pyramid's design, with the majority of the weight closer to the ground,[3] and with the pyramidion on top means that less material higher up on the pyramid will be pushing down from above. This distribution of weight allowed early civilizations to create stable monumental structures. Pyramids have been built by civilizations in many parts of the world. The largest pyramid by volume is the Great Pyramid
Pyramid
of Cholula, in the Mexican state of Puebla
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India
India
India
(official name: the Republic
Republic
of India;[19] Hindi: Bhārat Gaṇarājya) is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country, and the most populous democracy in the world. Bounded by the Indian Ocean on the south, the Arabian Sea
Arabian Sea
on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal on the southeast, it shares land borders with Pakistan
Pakistan
to the west;[d] China, Nepal, and Bhutan
Bhutan
to the north; and Bangladesh and Myanmar
Myanmar
to the east
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Taj Mahal
The Taj Mahal
Taj Mahal
(/ˌtɑːdʒ məˈhɑːl, ˌtɑːʒ-/;[3] meaning "Crown of the Palace"[4]) is an ivory-white marble mausoleum on the south bank of the Yamuna
Yamuna
river in the Indian city of Agra
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Moai
Moai
Moai
/ˈmoʊ.aɪ/ ( listen), or mo‘ai, are monolithic human figures carved by the Rapa Nui people
Rapa Nui people
on Easter Island
Easter Island
in eastern Polynesia
Polynesia
between the years 1250 and 1500.[1][2] Nearly half are still at Rano Raraku, the main moai quarry, but hundreds were transported from there and set on stone platforms called ahu around the island's perimeter. Almost all moai have overly large heads three-eighths the size of the whole statue
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Easter Island
Easter
Easter
Island (Rapa Nui: Rapa Nui, Spanish: Isla de Pascua) is a Chilean island in the southeastern Pacific Ocean, at the southeasternmost point of the Polynesian Triangle
Polynesian Triangle
in Oceania. Easter Island is most famous for its nearly 1,000 extant monumental statues, called moai, created by the early Rapa Nui people. In 1995, UNESCO named Easter
Easter
Island a World Heritage Site, with much of the island protected within Rapa Nui National Park. It is believed that Easter
Easter
Island's Polynesian inhabitants arrived on Easter
Easter
Island sometime near 1200 AD.[3] They created a thriving and industrious culture, as evidenced by the island's numerous enormous stone moai and other artifacts
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Statue Of Liberty
The Statue of Liberty
Statue of Liberty
(Liberty Enlightening the World; French: La Liberté éclairant le monde) is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island
Liberty Island
in New York Harbor
New York Harbor
in New York, in the United States. The copper statue, a gift from the people of France
France
to the people of the United States, was designed by French sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and its metal framework was built by Gustave Eiffel. The statue was dedicated on October 28, 1886. The Statue of Liberty
Statue of Liberty
is a figure of Libertas, a robed Roman liberty goddess. She holds a torch above her head with her right hand, and in her left hand carries a tabula ansata inscribed in Roman numerals
Roman numerals
with "JULY IV MDCCLXXVI" (July 4, 1776), the date of the U.S. Declaration of Independence
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Eiffel Tower
The Eiffel Tower
Eiffel Tower
(/ˈaɪfəl/ EYE-fəl; French: tour Eiffel [tuʁ‿ɛfɛl] ( listen)) is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars
Champ de Mars
in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower. Constructed from 1887–89 as the entrance to the 1889 World's Fair, it was initially criticized by some of France's leading artists and intellectuals for its design, but it has become a global cultural icon of France
France
and one of the most recognisable structures in the world.[3] The Eiffel Tower
Eiffel Tower
is the most-visited paid monument in the world; 6.91 million people ascended it in 2015. The tower is 324 metres (1,063 ft) tall, about the same height as an 81-storey building, and the tallest structure in Paris. Its base is square, measuring 125 metres (410 ft) on each side
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Washington D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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Brasília
Brasília
Brasília
(Portuguese pronunciation: [bɾaˈziljɐ]) is the federal capital of Brazil
Brazil
and seat of government of the Federal District. The city is located atop the Brazilian highlands
Brazilian highlands
in the country's center-western region. It was founded on April 21, 1960, to serve as the new national capital. Brasília
Brasília
and its metro area [note 2] were estimated to be Brazil's 3rd most populous city.[1] Among major Latin American cities, Brasília
Brasília
has the highest GDP per capita at R$61,915 (US$36,175).[3][4] Brasília
Brasília
was planned and developed by Lúcio Costa
Lúcio Costa
and Oscar Niemeyer in 1956 to move the capital from Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro
to a more central location. The landscape architect was Roberto Burle Marx
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Funerary Monument
Funerary art
Funerary art
is any work of art forming, or placed in, a repository for the remains of the dead. The term encompasses a wide variety of forms, including cenotaphs ("empty tombs"), tomb-like monuments which do not contain human remains, and communal memorials to the dead, such as war memorials, which may or may not contain remains, and a range of prehistoric megalithic constructs. Funerary art
Funerary art
may serve many cultural functions. It can play a role in burial rites, serve as an article for use by the dead in the afterlife, and celebrate the life and accomplishments of the dead, whether as part of kinship-centred practices of ancestor veneration or as a publicly directed dynastic display
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Pierre Charles L'Enfant
American Revolutionary WarSiege of Savannah (WIA) Pierre Charles L'Enfant
Pierre Charles L'Enfant
(French: [pjɛʁ ʃɑʁl lɑ̃fɑ̃]; August 2, 1754 – June 14, 1825), self-identified as Peter Charles L'Enfant while living in the United States, was a French-American military engineer who designed the basic plan for Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
(capital city of the U.S.) known today as the L'Enfant Plan
L'Enfant Plan
(1791).Contents1 Early life and education 2 Military service 3 Career3.1 Post–Revolutionary War 3.2 Plan for Federal City 3.3 Later works4 Death 5 Legacy 6 Honors 7 Notes 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksEarly life and education[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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