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Tuoba Gui
Emperor Daowu of Northern Wei
Northern Wei
((北)魏道武帝) (371–409), personal name Tuoba
Tuoba
Gui (拓拔珪), né Tuoba
Tuoba
Shegui (拓拔渉珪), was the founding emperor of the Northern Wei.[1] He was the grandson of the last prince of Dai, Tuoba
Tuoba
Shiyijian, and after the fall of the Dai state to Former Qin
Former Qin
in 376 had been presumed to be the eventual successor to the Dai throne. After Former Qin
Former Qin
fell into disarray in 383 following its defeat by Jin forces at the Battle of Fei River, Tuoba
Tuoba
Gui took the opportunity to reestablish Dai in 386, but soon changing the state's name to Wei and declared himself a prince. He was initially a vassal of Later Yan
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Chinese Name
Chinese personal names are names used by those from mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, and the Chinese diaspora
Chinese diaspora
overseas. Due to China's historical dominance of East Asian culture, many names used in Korea and Vietnam are adaptations of Chinese names, or have historical roots in Chinese, with appropriate adaptation to accommodate linguistic differences. Modern Chinese names consist of a surname known as xing (姓, xìng), which comes first and is usually but not always monosyllabic, followed by a personal name called ming (名, míng), which is nearly always mono- or disyllabic
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Ordos (city)
Ordos ( Ordos qota; simplified Chinese: 鄂尔多斯市; traditional Chinese: 鄂爾多斯市; pinyin: È'ěrduōsī) is one of the twelve major subdivisions of Inner Mongolia, China. It lies within the Ordos Loop of the Yellow River. Although mainly rural, Ordos is administered as a prefecture-level city. Ordos is known for its lavish government projects including most prominently the new Kangbashi District, an urban district planned as a massive civic mall with abundant monuments, cultural institutions, and other showpiece architecture. It was the venue for the 2012 Miss World Final. From the beginning the streets of Kangbashi didn't have much activity and was frequently described as a "ghost city"
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Book Of Song
The Book of Song (Sòng Shū) is a historical text of the Liu Song Dynasty of the Southern Dynasties
Southern Dynasties
of China. It covers history from 420 to 479, and is one of the Twenty-Four Histories, a traditional collection of historical records. It was written in 492–493 by Shen Yue from the Southern Qi
Southern Qi
dynasty (479–502).[1] The work contained 100 volumes at the time that it was written, but some volumes were already missing by the time of the Song Dynasty. Later editors reconstructed those volumes by taking material from the History of the Southern Dynasties, plus a few works such as the Historiette of Gao by Gao Jun, though many of those volumes were no longer in their original condition. References[edit]^ Wilkinson, Endymion (2012). Chinese History: A New Manual. Harvard University Asia Center
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Liu Song Dynasty
 MyanmarHistory of ChinaANCIENTNeolithic c. 8500 – c. 2070 BCE Xia dynasty
Xia dynasty
c. 2070 – c. 1600 BCE Shang dynasty
Shang dynasty
c. 1600 – c. 1046 BCE Zhou dynasty
Zhou dynasty
c
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Alchemy
Alchemy
Alchemy
is a philosophical and protoscientific tradition practiced throughout Europe, Africa
Africa
and Asia. It aimed to purify, mature, and perfect certain objects.[1][2][n 1] Common aims were chrysopoeia, the transmutation of "base metals" (e.g., lead) into "noble metals" (particularly gold); the creation of an elixir of immortality; the creation of panaceas able to cure any disease; and the development of an alkahest, a universal solvent.[3] The perfection of the human body and soul was thought to permit or result from the alchemical magnum opus and, in the Hellenistic and western tradition, the achievement of gnosis.[2] In Europe, the creation of a philosopher's stone was variously connected with all of these projects. In English, the term is often limited to descriptions of European alchemy, but similar practices existed in the Far East, the Indian subcontinent, and the Muslim world
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Cui Hao
Cui Hao (崔浩) (died 450 CE), courtesy name Boyuan (伯淵), was a prime minister of the Chinese/ Xianbei
Xianbei
dynasty Northern Wei. Largely because of Cui's counsel, Emperor Taiwu of Northern Wei
Northern Wei
was able to unify northern China, ending the Sixteen Kingdoms
Sixteen Kingdoms
era and, along with the southern Liu Song, entering the Southern and Northern Dynasties era. Also because of the influence of Cui, who was a devout Taoist, Emperor Taiwu became a devout Taoist
Taoist
as well
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Emperor Taiwu Of Northern Wei
Emperor Taiwu of Northern Wei
Northern Wei
((北)魏太武帝) (408–452), personal name Tuoba
Tuoba
Tao (拓拔燾), nickname Bili (佛貍),[4] was an emperor of Northern Wei.[5] He was generally regarded as a capable ruler, and during his reign, Northern Wei
Northern Wei
roughly doubled in size and united all of northern China, thus ending the Sixteen Kingdoms
Sixteen Kingdoms
period and, together with the southern dynasty Liu Song, started the Southern and Northern Dynasties period of Chinese history. He was a devout Taoist, under the influence of his prime minister Cui Hao, and in 444, at Cui Hao's suggestion and believing that Buddhists had supported the rebellion of Gai Wu (蓋吳), he ordered the abolition of Buddhism, at the penalty of death. This was the first of the Three Disasters of Wu for Chinese Buddhism
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Western Yan
The Western Yan
Western Yan
(Chinese: 西燕; pinyin: Xīyàn; 384-394) was a state of Xianbei
Xianbei
ethnicity during the era of Sixteen Kingdoms
Sixteen Kingdoms
in China. It was founded by Murong Hong in 384 in the aftermaths of Former Qin's defeat by Jin Dynasty (265-420)
Jin Dynasty (265-420)
at the Battle of Fei River, with the stated intent of permitting the Xianbei, whom Former Qin's emperor Fu Jiān had relocated to Former Qin's capital region after destroying Former Yan
Former Yan
in 370. It initially also was intended to rescue the last Former Yan
Former Yan
emperor Murong Wei, until he was executed by Fu Jiān in 385
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Chanyu
Chanyu
Chanyu
(Chinese: 單于; Chinese: 单于; pinyin: Chányú; short form for Chengli Gutu Chanyu
Chanyu
(Chinese: 撐犁孤塗單于; pinyin: Chēnglí Gūtu Chányú)) was the title used by the nomadic supreme rulers of
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Rouran
The Rouran Khaganate
Rouran Khaganate
(Chinese: 柔然; pinyin: Róurán), Ruanruan/Ruru (Chinese: 蠕蠕/茹茹; pinyin: Ruǎnruǎn/Rúrú), or Tantan[3] (Chinese: 檀檀; pinyin: Tántán) was the name of a state established by proto-Mongols, from the late 4th century until the middle 6th century.[4] Rouran is a Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese
transcription of the endonym of the confederacy. Ruanruan and Ruru remained in usage despite being derogatory. They derived from orders given by the Emperor Taiwu of Northern Wei, who waged war against the Rouran and intended to intimidate the confederacy
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Later Qin
The Later Qin
Later Qin
(simplified Chinese: 后秦; traditional Chinese: 後秦; pinyin: Hòuqín; 384-417), also known as Yao Qin (姚秦), was a state of Qiang ethnicity of the Sixteen Kingdoms
Sixteen Kingdoms
during the Jin
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Fu Pi
Fu Pi (Chinese: 苻丕; died 386), courtesy name Yongshu (永叔), formally Emperor
Emperor
Aiping of (Former) Qin ((前)秦哀平帝), was an emperor of the Chinese/Di state Former Qin
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Murong Yong
Murong
Murong
Yong (Chinese: 慕容永; died 394), courtesy name Shuming (叔明), was the last emperor of the Xianbei
Xianbei
state Western Yan. He was the grandson of Murong
Murong
Yun (慕容運), the uncle of Former Yan's founder Murong
Murong
Huang. As a member of Former Yan's imperial clan, he was moved to Guanzhong, Former Qin's capital region, when Former Qin destroyed Former Yan
Former Yan
in 370
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Changzhi
Changzhi
Changzhi
(simplified Chinese: 长治; traditional Chinese: 長治; Pinyin: Chángzhì) is a prefecture-level city in Shanxi
Shanxi
Province, China. Historically, the city was one of the 36 administrative areas (see Administrative Divisions of Qin Dynasty) extant under the reign of the first emperor of a unified China
China
(see Qin Shi Huang)
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Shanxi
Shanxi
Shanxi
(Chinese: 山西; pinyin:  Shānxī; postal: Shansi) is a province of China, located in the North China
China
region. Its one-character abbreviation is "晋" (pinyin: Jìn), after the state of Jin that existed here during the Spring and Autumn period. The name Shanxi
Shanxi
means "West of the Mountains", a reference to the province's location west of the Taihang Mountains.[5] Shanxi
Shanxi
borders Hebei
Hebei
to the east, Henan
Henan
to the south, Shaanxi
Shaanxi
to the west, and Inner Mongolia to the north and is made up mainly of a plateau bounded partly by mountain ranges
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