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Tumpong
The tumpong (also inci among the Maranao) is a type of Philippine bamboo flute used by the Maguindanaon, half the size of the largest bamboo flute, the palendag. A lip-valley flute like the palendag, the tumpong makes a sound when players blow through a bamboo reed placed on top of the instrument and the air stream produced is passed over an airhole atop the instrument
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Philippine
Coordinates: 13°N 122°E / 13°N 122°E / 13; 122 Republic
Republic
of the Philippines Republika ng PilipinasFlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Maka-Diyos, Maka-Tao, Makakalikasan at Makabansa"[1] "For God, People, Nature, and Country"Anthem: Lupang Hinirang Chosen LandGreat SealDakilang Sagisag ng Pilipinas  (Tagalog) Great Seal of the PhilippinesCapital Manilaa 14°35′N 120°58′E / 14.583°N 120.967°E / 14.583; 120.967Largest city
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Maguindanao
Maguindanao
Maguindanao
(Maguindanaoan: Dalapa sa Magindanaw) is a province in the Philippines
Philippines
located in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM)
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Maranao
The Maranao people
Maranao people
(Maranao: ['mәranaw]; Filipino: Mëranaw (based on Papanoka Mera)[2]), also spelled Meranao, Maranaw (based on Marapatik) and Mëranaw, is the term used by the Philippine government to refer to the southern tribe who are the "people of the lake" (Ranao in the Iranaon language),[citation needed] a predominantly- Muslim
Muslim
region of the Philippine island of Mindanao. They are known for their artwork, weaving, wood and metal crafts and epic literature, the Darangen.Contents1 Etymology 2 Culture2.1 Language 2.2 Art 2.3 Music 2.4 Cuisine2.4.1 Social structure3 Demographics 4 History 5 Notes and references 6 External linksEtymology[edit]A satellite image of Lake Lanao.The word Maranao is a misnomer as it does not have a sense in reference to nouns such as people, places or things. The prefix Ma- means 'to be', i.e., Maranao means to be a lake
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Lip-valley Flute
The end-blown flute (also called an edge-blown flute or rim-blown flute) is a keyless woodwind instrument played by directing an airstream against the sharp edge of the upper end of a tube. Unlike a recorder or tin whistle, there is not a ducted flue voicing, also known as a fipple. Most rim-blown flutes are "oblique" flutes, being played at an angle to the body's vertical axis. They generate sound by at this end blown voicing by siphon effect. A notched flute is an end-blown flute with a notch on the blowing surface. A lip-valley flute is a type of notched flute. End-blown flutes are widespread in folk music and art music. In the Middle East and Mediterranean the ney is frequently used, constructed from reed. Depictions of early versions of the ney can be found in wall paintings in ancient Egyptian tombs, indicating that it is one of the oldest musical instruments in continuous use
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Flute
Plucked Appalachian dulcimer
Appalachian dulcimer
(United States) Autoharp Baglama
Baglama
or Saz (Turkey) Bajo sexto
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Gandingan A Kayo
The gandingan a kayo (translated means, “wooden gandingan,” or “gandingan made of wood”) is a Philippine xylophone and considered the wooden version of the real gandingan. This instrument is a relatively new instrument coming of age due to the increasing popularity of the “wooden kulintang ensemble”. Unlike the original gandingan, the gandingan a kayo cannot be used for long-distance communication.[1] References[edit]^ Mercurio, Philip Dominguez (2006). "Traditional Music of the Southern Philippines". PnoyAndTheCity: A center for Kulintang - A home for Pasikings
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Kagul
Also called tagutok (Maranao),[1] bantula or tagungtung (Bukidnon) and kuratung (Banuwaen).[2]A kagul, a Philippine
Philippine
bamboo scraper gong/slit drum of the Maguindanaon
Maguindanaon
peopleThe kagul is a type of Philippine
Philippine
bamboo scraper gong/slit drum of the Maguindanaon
Maguindanaon
and Visayans with a jagged edge on one side, played with two beaters, one scarping the jagged edge and the other one making a beat. The Maguindanaon
Maguindanaon
and the Banuwaen use it in the rice paddies to guard against voracious birds, using the sound it produces to scare them away.[3] The Maguindanaon
Maguindanaon
and the Bukidnon
Bukidnon
also used to use it for simple dance rhythms during social occasions
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Agung A Tamlang
The Agung
Agung
a Tamlang is a type of Philippine
Philippine
slit drum made of hollowed out bamboo in imitation of the real agung. Pitch is determined by the length and depth of the slit. The agung a tamlang is used as practice for the real agung: players either use either one agung a tamlang (hold it with one hand and using the other to strike it with a beater) or using two agung a tamlangs where the other agung is held with one’s feet.[1] References[edit]^ Mercurio, Philip Dominguez (2006). "Traditional Music of the Southern Philippines". PnoyAndTheCity: A center for Kulintang
Kulintang
- A home for Pasikings. Archived from the original on 21 July 2006
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Luntang
The luntang is a type of Philippine xylophone of the Maguindanaon people, strung vertically, with five horizontal logs hung in ascending order arranged by pitch. The Maguindanaon refer to this instrument as a luntang while the Yakan call it a kwintangan kayo. The cylindrical logs are beaten at the edge to create sounds and can be played either solo or with two people on either side. Among the Maguindanaon, the luntang is used only for self-entertainment purposes, to keep farmers awake while at the same time keeping the birds away from the fields. Commonly used for long distance communication some times ago by the Maguindanaon,[1] the Yakan have taken its use a step further: using it for social interactions between sexes as well.[2] See also[edit]XylophoneReferences[edit]^ Mercurio, Philip Dominguez (2006). "Traditional Music of the Southern Philippines". PnoyAndTheCity: A center for Kulintang - A home for Pasikings. Retrieved June 12, 2006.  ^ de la Paz, Salve (2006)
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Kubing
The kubing is a type of Philippine
Philippine
jaw harp from bamboo found among the Maguindanaon and other Muslim and non-Muslim tribes in the Philippines
Philippines
and Indonesia. It is also called kobing (Maranao), kolibau (Tingguian), aru-ding (Tagbanwa),[1] aroding (Palawan),[2] kulaing (Yakan), karombi (Toraja), yori (Kailinese) or Kulibaw[citation needed]. Ones made of sugar palm-leaf are called karinta (Munanese), ore-ore mbondu or ore Ngkale (Butonese).[3] The kubing is traditionally considered an intimate instrument, usually used as communication between family or a loved one in close quarters. Both genders can use the instrument, the females more infrequently than males who use it for short distance courtship.[4] See also[edit]Jaw harp LamellophoneReferences[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Kubing.^ Hila, Antonio C (2006)
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Kulintang A Tiniok
Also called kulintang a putao (Maguindanaon), sarunay, salunay, salonay, saronai, sarunai (Maranao, Iranun, Ilud) The kulintang a tiniok is a type of Philippine
Philippine
metallophone with eight tuned knobbed metal plates strung together via string atop a wooden antangan (rack). Kulintang
Kulintang
a tiniok is a Maguindanaon term meaning “kulintang with string” but they also could call them kulintang a putao, meaning “kulintang of metal.” The Maranao
Maranao
refer to this instrument as a sarunay (or salunay, salonay, saronay, saronai, sarunai), terminology which has become popular for this instrument in America. This is considered a relatively recent instrument and surprisingly many of them are only made of tin-can
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Dabakan
The dabakan is a single-headed[4] Philippine drum, primarily used as a supportive instrument in the kulintang ensemble. Among the five main kulintang instruments, it is the only non-gong element of the Maguindanao
Maguindanao
ensemble.Contents1 Description 2 Technique 3 Uses 4 Origin 5 Other Derivative Names 6 ReferencesDescription[edit] The dabakan is frequently described as either hour-glass,[5] conical,[3] tubular,[1] or goblet in shape[6] Normally, the dabakan is found having a length of more than two feet and a diameter of more than a foot about the widest part of the shell.[2] The shell is carved from wood [5] either out of the trunk of a coconut tree or the wood of a jackfruit tree which is then hollowed out throughout its body and stem
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Kulintang A Kayo
The kulintang a kayo (literally, “wooden kulintang”) is a Philippine xylophone of the Maguindanaon people with eight tuned slabs strung horizontally atop a padded wooden antangan (rack). Made of hand-carved soft wood such as bayug (genus Pterospermum) or more likely tamnag (genus unknown), the kulintang a kayo is rarely found except in Maguindanaon households which have a strong kulintang musical heritage. Traditionally, this homemade instrument was used for self-entertainment purposes inside the house, so that beginning musicians could practice kulintang pieces before performing them on the full-sized metal kulintang sets. Only recently have these instruments been used as part of a wooden kulintang ensemble. This ancient instrument is considered to have existed in the Philippines before the importation of metal gongs from China and therefore is considered a precursor to the present-day kulintang.[1] References[edit]^ Mercurio, Philip Dominguez (2006)
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Babendil
The babandil is a single, narrow-rimmed Philippine gong[1] used primarily as the “timekeeper” of the Maguindanao kulintang ensemble.[2]Contents1 Description 2 Technique 3 Uses 4 Origins 5 Other derivative names 6 ReferencesDescription[edit] The babandil usually has a diameter of roughly one foot making it larger than the largest kulintang gong and comparable to the diameter of the agung or gandingan
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