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Tulsa, Oklahoma
Tulsa /ˈtʌlsə/ is the second-largest city in the state of Oklahoma and 47th-most populous city in the United States. As of July 2015, the population was 403,505, an increase of 11,599 over that reported in the 2010 Census.[5] It is the principal municipality of the Tulsa Metropolitan Area, a region with 981,005 residents in the MSA and 1,151,172 in the CSA.[6] The city serves as the county seat of Tulsa County, the most densely populated county in Oklahoma,[7] with urban development extending into Osage, Rogers, and Wagoner counties.[5] Tulsa was settled between 1828 and 1836 by the Lochapoka Band of Creek Native American tribe. For most of the 20th century, the city held the nickname "Oil Capital of the World" and played a major role as one of the most important hubs for the American oil industry.[8] Once heavily dependent on the oil industry, Tulsa experienced economic downturn
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Tulsa (other)
Tulsa
Tulsa
is a city in Oklahoma, United States. Tulsa
Tulsa
may also refer to: Tulsa
Tulsa
(film), starring Susan Hayward and Robert Preston USS Tulsa, the name of two U.S
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County Seat
A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in the United States, Canada, Romania, Mainland China
Mainland China
and Taiwan. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.Contents1 Function 2 U.S. counties with more than one county seat 3 Other variations3.1 New England 3.2 Virginia 3.3 South Dakota 3.4 Louisiana 3.5 Alaska 3.6 Canada
Canada
and Vermont4 Lists of U.S. county seats by state 5 Lists of Taiwan
Taiwan
county seats by county 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksFunction[edit] In most of the United States, counties are the political subdivisions of a state. The city, town, or populated place that houses county government is known as the seat of its respective county
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Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(abbreviated DST), sometimes referred to as daylight savings time in US, Canadian and Australian speech,[1][2] and known as British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST) in the UK and just summer time in some countries, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time.[3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation, starting on April 30, 1916
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UTC−5
UTC−05:00 is a time offset that subtracts five hours from Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). In North America, it is observed in the Eastern Time Zone
Eastern Time Zone
during standard time, and in the Central Time Zone during the other eight months (see Daylight saving time)
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ZIP Code
ZIP Codes are a system of postal codes used by the United States Postal Service (USPS) since 1963. The term ZIP is an acronym for Zone Improvement Plan;[1] it was chosen to suggest that the mail travels more efficiently and quickly (zipping along) when senders use the code in the postal address. The basic format consists of five digits. An extended 'ZIP+4' code was introduced in 1983 which includes the five digits of the ZIP Code, followed by a hyphen and four additional digits that determine a more specific location. The term ZIP Code
ZIP Code
was originally registered as a servicemark by the U.S
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Telephone Numbering Plan
A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunication to assign telephone numbers to subscriber telephones or other telephony endpoints.[1] Telephone numbers are the addresses of participants in a telephone network, reachable by a system of destination code routing. Telephone numbering plans are defined in each of administrative regions of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and they are also present in private telephone networks. For public number systems, geographic location plays a role in the sequence of numbers assigned to each telephone subscriber. Numbering plans may follow a variety of design strategies which have often arisen from the historical evolution of individual telephone networks and local requirements. A broad division is commonly recognized, distinguishing open numbering plans and closed numbering plans[discuss]
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Federal Information Processing Standard
Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the United States federal government
United States federal government
for use in computer systems by non-military government agencies and government contractors.[1] FIPS standards are issued to establish requirements for various purposes such as ensuring computer security and interoperability, and are intended for cas
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Geographic Names Information System
The Geographic Names Information System
Geographic Names Information System
(GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States
United States
of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States
United States
Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States
United States
Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names. The database is part of a system that includes topographic map names and bibliographic references. The names of books and historic maps that confirm the feature or place name are cited. Variant names, alternatives to official federal names for a feature, are also recorded
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United States Metropolitan Area
PopulationArea Density Ethnic identity Foreign-born Income Spanish speakers By decadeUrban areasPopulous cities and metropolitan areasMetropolitan areas574 Primary Statistical Areas 174 Combined Statistical Areas 929 Core Based Statistical Areas 389 Metropolitan Statistical Areas 541 Micropolitan Statistical AreasMegaregionsSee also North American metro areas World citiesv t eThe United States
United States

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Creek People
The Muscogee, also known as the Creek and the Creek Confederacy, are a closely related group of native North American tribes or Indigenous peoples of the Southeastern Woodlands.[2] Mvskoke (English: /məˈskoʊdʒi/; Mvskoke [maskóːkî]) is their autonym. They are originally from a single confederated native land that now comprises southern Tennessee, all of Alabama, western Georgia and part of northern Florida,[3] Most of the original population of the Muscogee people
Muscogee people
were forcibly relocated from their native lands in the 1830s during the Trail of Tears to Indian Territory
Indian Territory
(now Oklahoma)
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Time Zone
A time zone is a region of the globe that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. Time
Time
zones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions because it is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time. Most of the time zones on land are offset from Coordinated Universal Time
Time
(UTC) by a whole number of hours ( UTC−12
UTC−12
to UTC+14), but a few zones are offset by 30 or 45 minutes (e.g. Newfoundland Standard Time is UTC−03:30, Nepal
Nepal
Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:45, and Indian Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:30). Some higher latitude and temperate zone countries use daylight saving time for part of the year, typically by adjusting local clock time by an hour
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Oil Capital Of The World
Capital may refer to: Capital city, the area of a country, province, region, or state, regarded as enjoying primary status, usually but not always the seat of the government Capital letter, an upper-case letter in a writing systemCapitals (typeface), a small-caps serif typeface Illuminated capital
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Petroleum Industry
The petroleum industry, also known as the oil industry or the oil patch, includes the global processes of exploration, extraction, refining, transporting (often by oil tankers and pipelines), and marketing of petroleum products. The largest volume products of the industry are fuel oil and gasoline (petrol). Petroleum
Petroleum
(oil) is also the raw material for many chemical products, including pharmaceuticals, solvents, fertilizers, pesticides, synthetic fragrances, and plastics. The industry is usually divided into three major components: upstream, midstream and downstream. Midstream operations are often included in the downstream category. Petroleum
Petroleum
is vital to many industries, and is of importance to the maintenance of industrial civilization in its current configuration, and thus is a critical concern for many nations
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NCAA
The National Collegiate Athletic Association
National Collegiate Athletic Association
(NCAA)[a] is a non-profit organization which regulates athletes of 1,281 institutions and conferences. It also organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States
United States
and Canada, and helps more than 480,000 college student-athletes who compete annually in college sports. The organization is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana. In its 2016-17 fiscal year the NCAA took in $1.06 billion dollars in revenue, over 82% of which was generated by the Division I Men's Basketball
Basketball
Tournament
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NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
(D-I) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States. D-I schools include the major collegiate athletic powers, with larger budgets, more elaborate facilities and more athletic scholarships than Divisions II and III as well as many smaller schools committed to the highest level of intercollegiate competition. This level was once called the University Division of the NCAA, in contrast to the lower level College Division; these terms were replaced with numeric divisions in 1973
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