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Trimurti
The Trimūrti (/trɪˈmʊərti/;[1] Sanskrit: त्रिमूर्तिः trimūrti, "three forms") is the trinity of supreme divinity in Hinduism[2][3][4][5] in which the cosmic functions of creation, maintenance, and destruction are personified as a triad of deities, typically Brahma
Brahma
the creator, Vishnu
Vishnu
the preserver, and Shiva
Shiva
the destroyer,[6][7] though individual denominations may vary from that particular line-up
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Adi Shankara
Shaivism/Tantra/NathKashmir Shaivism Pratyabhijna Nath Inchegeri SampradayaNew movementsNeo-Advaita NondualismConcepts Classical Advaita
Advaita
vedantaAtman Brahman Avidya Ajativada Mahāvākyas Om Tat Tvam Asi Three Bodies Aham Cause and effect KoshaKashmir ShaivismPratyabhijna so'hamPracticesGuru Meditation Svādhyāya Sravana, manana, nididhyasana Jnana yoga Rāja yoga "Unfoldment of the middle" Self-enquiryMokshaMoksha Anubhava Turiya SahajaTexts
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Halebidu
Halebidu (IAST: Haḷēbīḍ, also Halebeedu or Halebid, literally "old capital, encampment") is a town located in Hassan District, Karnataka, India. Halebidu (which used to be called Dorasamudra or Dwarasamudra) was the regal capital of the Hoysala Empire
Hoysala Empire
in the 12th century. It is home to some of the best examples of Hoysala architecture. Most notable are the ornate Hoysaleshwara and Kedareshwara temples. The city got the name "Halebidu" because it was damaged and deserted into "old capital" after being ransacked and looted twice by Islamic forces of the Delhi Sultanate
Delhi Sultanate
in the 14th-century.[1][2][3] The town is known for its temple complexes:[4][5][6]HinduismHoysaleshwara temple Kedareshwara templeJainismParshvanatha Basadi Shantinatha BasadiHalebidu is connected by road and rail to Hassan (30 km) and Mysuru (150 km)
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Gharapuri Island
Elephanta Island
Elephanta Island
(also called Gharapuri Island or place of caves or Pory Island[1]) is one of a number of islands in Mumbai
Mumbai
Harbour, east of Mumbai, India.Contents1 Tourist attractions and accessibility 2 History 3 Orientation 4 Agricultural makeup 5 Inhabitants 6 Gallery 7 ReferencesTourist attractions and accessibility[edit] This island is a popular tourist destination because of the island's cave temples, the Elephanta Caves, that have been carved out of rock. The island is easily accessible by ferry from Mumbai, being about 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) from the south east coast of the island city. Boats leave daily from the Gateway of India, taking about an hour each way. The tickets for these can be bought at the Gateway itself. The first ferry leaves at 9 am and the last at 2 pm
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Saguna Brahman
VedantaAdvaita Vishishtadvaita Dvaita Vedanta Bhedabheda Dvaitadvaita Achintya Bheda Abheda ShuddhadvaitaHeterodoxCharvaka Ājīvika Buddhism JainismOther schoolsVaishnava Smarta Shakta ĪśvaraShaiva: Pratyabhijña Pashupata SiddhantaTantraTeachers (Acharyas)NyayaAkṣapāda Gotama Jayanta Bhatta Raghunatha SiromaniMīmāṃsāJaimini Kumārila Bhaṭṭa Prabhākara Advaita
Advaita
VedantaGaudapada Adi Shankara Vācaspati Miśra Vidyaranya Sadananda Madhusūdana Sarasvatī Vijnanabhiksu Ramakrishna Vivekananda Ramana Maharshi Siddharudha Chinmayananda N
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Deity
A deity (/ˈdiːəti/ ( listen) or /ˈdeɪ.əti/ ( listen))[1] is a hypothetical supernatural being considered divine or sacred.[2] The Oxford Dictionary of English defines deity as "a god or goddess (in a polytheistic religion)", or anything revered as divine.[3] C
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Sadyojata
According to Śaiva Agama, Lord Shiva
Shiva
performs five actions - creation, preservation, dissolution, concealing grace, and revealing grace. Each of the five actions corresponds to a name and form of Shiva
Shiva
with varying attributes. These five names are:Contents1 Names 2 Aspects 3 Meditation 4 ReferencesNames[edit] Names with Relation to Action Performed, Direction Faced, and Associated Element:Sadyojāta - Creation. West. Earth. Pṛthvī. Vāmadeva - Preservation. North. Water. Jala. Aghora -Dissolution/Rejuvenation. South. Fire. Agni Tatpuruṣa - Concealing Grace. East. Vāyu. Air. Īśāna - Revealing Grace. North-east. Ether (Ākāśa).Aspects[edit] Though bearing each a different name, form, and set of qualities, these are all aspects of a one Supreme Being - Śiva, and are not to be looked upon as different deities. 1. Sadyojāta: Represents Icchā Śaktī
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Vamadeva
In Hinduism, Vamadeva
Vamadeva
(Sanskrit: वामदेव) is the name of the preserving aspect of the God Siva, one of six aspects of the universe he embodies, as well as the name of an ancient rishi. On a five-faced Sivalingam, Vamadeva
Vamadeva
appears on the right hand side. This face/aspect of Śiva is considered the peaceful, graceful and poetic one — the lord of the female aspect of it is associated with water. The Brahman
Brahman
splits into male (Parashiva) and female (Parasakti) and manifests as the universe
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Arthur Llewellyn Basham
Arthur Llewellyn Basham
Arthur Llewellyn Basham
(24 May 1914 – 27 January 1986) was a noted historian and Indologist and author of a number of books. As a Professor at the School of Oriental
Oriental
and African Studies, London
London
in the 1950s and the 1960s, he taught a number of famous Indian historians, including Professors R.S. Sharma, Romila Thapar
Romila Thapar
and V.S. Pathak.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Books 4 Bibliography 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Arthur Llewellyn Basham
Arthur Llewellyn Basham
was born on 24 May 1914, in Loughton, Essex, the son of Abraham Arthur Edward Basham and Maria Jane Basham née Thompson.[1] Although an only child, he grew up in Essex
Essex
with his adopted sister, who was in fact his cousin on his father's side
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Bhairava
Shiva
Shiva
- ShaktiSadasiva Rudra Bhairava Parvati Durga KaliGanesha Murugan OthersScriptures and textsAgamas and TantrasVedas SvetasvataraTirumurai Shivasutras VachanasPhilosophyThree ComponentsPati Pashu PasamThree bondagesAnava Karma Maya 36 Tattvas YogaPracticesVibhuti Rudraksha Panchakshara Bilva Maha Shivaratri Yamas-Niyamas Guru-Linga-JangamSchoolsAdi MargamPashupata Kalamukha Kapalika <
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R. C. Majumdar
Ramesh Chandra Majumdar (known as R. C. Majumdar; 4 December 1884 – 11 February 1980)[1] was a historian and professor of Indian history.[2][3]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Works 4 Views on the Indian independence movement 5 Bibliography 6 References 7 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Born in Khandarpara, Faridpur, Bengal Presidency, British India
British India
(now in Bangladesh) on 4 December 1884, to Haladhara Majumdar and Bidhumukhi.[1] In 1905, he passed his Entrance Examination from Ravenshaw College, Cuttack.[1] In 1907, he passed F.A. with first class scholarship from Surendranath College
Surendranath College
and joined Presidency College, Calcutta.[1] Graduating in B.A.(Honours) and M.A
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Vedic Period
The Vedic period
Vedic period
or Vedic age (c. 1500 – c. 600 BCE) is the period in the history of the Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
intervening between the end of the urban Indus Valley Civilization, and a second urbanisation which began in c. 600 BCE. It gets its name from the Vedas, which are liturgical texts containing details of life during this period that have been interpreted to be historical[1] and constitute the primary sources for understanding the period. The Vedas
Vedas
were composed and orally transmitted by speakers of an Old Indo-Aryan language who had migrated into the northwestern regions of the Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
early in this period. The associated Vedic culture was tribal and pastoral until c. 1200 or 1100 BCE, and centred in the Punjab
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Personified
Anthropomorphism is the attribution of human traits, emotions, or intentions to non-human entities.[1] It is considered to be an innate tendency of human psychology.[2] Personification is the related attribution of human form and characteristics to abstract concepts such as nations, emotions and natural forces like seasons and the weather. Both have ancient roots as storytelling and artistic devices, and most cultures have traditional fables with anthropomorphized animals as characters
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Devanagari
Devanagari
Devanagari
(/ˌdeɪvəˈnɑːɡəri/ DAY-və-NAH-gə-ree; देवनागरी, IAST: Devanāgarī, a compound of "deva" दे
and "nāgarī" नागरी; Hindi
Hindi
pronunciation: [d̪eːʋˈnaːɡri]), also called Nagari (Nāgarī, नागरी),[5] is an abugida (alphasyllabary) used in India
India
and Nepal
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Sanskrit
A few attempts at revival have been reported in Indian and Nepalese newspapers. India: 14,135 Indians claimed Sanskrit
Sanskrit
to be their mother tongue in the 2001 Census of India:[2] Nepal: 1,669 Nepalis
Nepalis
in 2011
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Conservation (ethic)
Conservation is an ethic of resource use, allocation, and protection. Its primary focus is upon maintaining the health of the natural world, its fisheries, habitats, and biological diversity. Secondary focus is on material conservation, including non-renewable resources such as metals, minerals and fossil fuels, and energy conservation, which is important to protect the natural world. Those who follow the conservation ethic and, especially, those who advocate or work toward conservation goals are termed conservationists. The terms conservation and preservation are frequently conflated outside the academic, scientific, and professional kinds of literature. The US National Park Service offers the following explanation of the important ways in which these two terms represent very different conceptions of environmental protection ethics: ″Conservation and preservation are closely linked and may indeed seem to mean the same thing
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