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Treason Act 1351
The Treason
Treason
Act 1351 is an Act of the Parliament of England
Parliament of England
which codified and curtailed the common law offence of treason. No new offences were created by the statute.[3] It is one of the earliest English statutes still in force, although it has been very significantly amended.[4][5] It was extended to Ireland in 1495[6] and to Scotland in 1708.[7] The Act was passed at Westminster in the Hilary term of 1351, in the 25th year of the reign of Edward III and was entitled "A Declaration which Offences shall be adjudged Treason". It was passed to clarify precisely what was treason, as the definition under common law had been expanded rapidly by the courts until its scope was controversially wide. The Act was last used to prosecute William Joyce
William Joyce
in 1945 for collaborating with Germany in World War II. The Act is still in force in the United Kingdom
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Parliament Of England
1Reflecting Parliament
Parliament
as it stood in 1707.See also: Parliament
Parliament
of Scotland, Parliament
Parliament
of IrelandThe Parliament
Parliament
of England was the legislature of the Kingdom of England, existing from the early 13th century until 1707, when it became the Parliament of Great Britain
Parliament of Great Britain
after the political union of England and Scotland created the Kingdom of Great Britain. In 1066, William of Normandy
William of Normandy
introduced what, in later centuries, became referred to as a feudal system, by which he sought the advice of a council of tenants-in-chief (a person who held land) and ecclesiastics before making laws
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Great Seal Of Scotland
The Great Seal of Scotland
Scotland
(Scottish Gaelic: Seala Mòr na h-Alba) allows the monarch to authorise official documents without having to sign each document individually. Wax is melted in a metal mould or matrix and impressed into a wax figure that is attached by cord or ribbon to documents that the monarch wishes to make official. The earliest seal impression, in the Treasury of Durham Cathedral, is believed to be the Great Seal of Duncan II and dates to 1094.Contents1 History 2 List of Keepers of the Great Seal of Scotland
Scotland
prior to the Union 3 List of Keepers of the Great Seal of Scotland
Scotland
since the Union 4 Register 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The Chancellor had the custody of the King's Seal
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Long Title
The short title is the formal name by which a piece of primary legislation may by law be cited in the United Kingdom and other Westminster-influenced jurisdictions (such as Canada or Australia), as well as the United States and the Philippines. It contrasts with the long title which, while usually being more fully descriptive of the legislation's purpose and effects, is generally too unwieldy for most uses. For example, the short title House of Lords Act 1999
House of Lords Act 1999
contrasts with the long title An Act to restrict membership of the House of Lords by virtue of a hereditary peerage; to make related provision about disqualifications for voting at elections to, and for membership of, the House of Commons; and for connected purposes. The long title (properly, the title in some jurisdictions) is the formal title appearing at the head of a statute (such as an Act of Parliament or of Congress) or other legislative instrument
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King's Bench
Kings
Kings
or King's may refer to:Monarchs: The Sovereign Heads of states and/or nations, with the male being kings One of several works known as the "Book of Kings":The Books of Kings
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Court Of Common Pleas (England)
The Court of Common Pleas, or Common Bench, was a common law court in the English legal system
English legal system
that covered "common pleas"; actions between subject and subject, which did not concern the king. Created in the late 12th to early 13th century after splitting from the Exchequer
Exchequer
of Pleas, the Common Pleas served as one of the central English courts for around 600 years. Authorised by Magna Carta
Magna Carta
to sit in a fixed location, the Common Pleas sat in Westminster Hall[1] for its entire existence, joined by the Exchequer of Pleas
Exchequer of Pleas
and Court of King's Bench.[1] The court's jurisdiction was gradually undercut by the King's Bench and Exchequer of Pleas
Exchequer of Pleas
with legal fictions, the Bill of Middlesex
Bill of Middlesex
and Writ of Quominus respectively
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Assize
The courts of assize, or assizes (/əˈsaɪzɪz/), were periodic courts held around England and Wales
England and Wales
until 1972, when together with the quarter sessions they were abolished by the Courts Act 1971
Courts Act 1971
and replaced by a single permanent Crown Court
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Exchequer Of Pleas
The Exchequer
Exchequer
of Pleas or Court of Exchequer
Exchequer
was a court that dealt with matters of equity, a set of legal principles based on natural law and common law in England and Wales. Originally part of the curia regis, or King's Council, the Exchequer
Exchequer
of Pleas split from the curia during the 1190s, to sit as an independent, central court. The Court of Chancery's reputation for tardiness and expense resulted in much of its business transferring to the Exchequer. The Exchequer
Exchequer
and Chancery, with similar jurisdictions, drew closer together over the years, until an argument was made during the 19th century that having two seemingly identical courts was unnecessary. As a result, the Exchequer
Exchequer
lost its equity jurisdiction
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Prelate
A prelate is a high-ranking member of the clergy who is an ordinary or who ranks in precedence with ordinaries. The word derives from the Latin
Latin
prælatus, the past participle of præferre, which means "carry before", "be set above or over" or "prefer"; hence, a prelate is one set over others. The archetypal prelate is a bishop, whose prelature is his particular church. All other prelates, including the regular prelates such as abbots and major superiors, are based upon this original model of prelacy.Contents1 Related terminology 2 Territorial prelatures 3 Personal prelatures 4 Controversies Surrounding Retired Prelates 5 See also 6 ReferencesRelated terminology[edit] In a general sense, a prelate in the Catholic Church and other Christian churches is a bishop or another ecclesiastical person having ordinary authority over a jurisdiction equivalent to a diocese or a similar jurisdiction (e.g
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Acts Of Union 1707
The Acts of Union were two Acts of Parliament: the Union with Scotland Act 1706 passed by the Parliament of England, and the Union with England Act passed in 1707 by the Parliament of Scotland. They put into effect the terms of the Treaty of Union
Treaty of Union
that had been agreed on 22 July 1706, following negotiation between commissioners representing the parliaments of the two countries
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Treason Act 1708
The Treason Act 1708 (7 Ann c 21) is an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain which harmonised the law of high treason between the former kingdoms of England and Scotland following their union as Great Britain in 1707. This Act is partly still in force in Great Britain (as of 2013).[2]Contents1 Offences 2 Procedure 3 Sections still in force 4 Other treason legislation in 1708 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOffences[edit] Before the Act was passed, treason in Scotland consisted of "theft in landed men, murder under trust, wilful fire-raising, firing coalheughs, and assassination." Section 1 of the Act abolished these offences and replaced them with the English definition of high treason. The Act also applied the English offence of misprision of treason to Scotland. (However it did not extend petty treason to Scotland.) The Act also created new offences of treason
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Senator Of The College Of Justice
The Senators of the College of Justice
College of Justice
are judges of the College of Justice, a set of legal institutions involved in the administration of justice in Scotland. There are three types of Senator: Lords of Session (judges of the Court of Session); Lords Commissioners of Justiciary (judges of the High Court of Justiciary); and the Chairman of the Scottish Land Court. Whilst the High Court and Court of Session historically maintained separate judiciary, these are now one and the same, and the term, Senator, is almost exclusively used in referring to the judges of these courts. Senators of the College use the title Lord or Lady along with a surname or a territorial name
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Great Seal Of The Realm
The Great Seal of the Realm
Great Seal of the Realm
or Great Seal of the United Kingdom (known prior to the Treaty of Union of 1707 as the Great Seal of England; and from then until the Union of 1801 as the Great Seal of Great Britain and Ireland) is a seal that is used to symbolise the Sovereign's approval of important state documents. Scotland has had its own great seal since the 14th century. The Acts of Union 1707, joining the kingdoms of Scotland and England, provide for the use of a single Great Seal for the united kingdoms.[1] However, it also provides for the continued use of a separate Scottish seal to be used there (this seal continues to be called the "Great Seal of Scotland" though it is not technically one)
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Forgery Act 1861
The Forgery Act 1861 (24 & 25 Vict c 98) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (as it then was). It consolidated provisions related to forgery from a number of earlier statutes into a single Act. For the most part these provisions were, according to the draftsman of the Act,[3] incorporated with little or no variation in their phraseology. It is one of a group of Acts sometimes referred to as the criminal law consolidation Acts 1861. It was passed with the object of simplifying the law. It is essentially a revised version of an earlier consolidation Act, the Forgery Act 1830 (11 Geo 4 & 1 Will 4 c 66) (and the equivalent Irish Act), incorporating subsequent statutes.[4] Most of it was repealed by the Forgery Act 1913, and today forgery is mostly covered by the Forgery and Counterfeiting Act 1981 and the Identity Documents Act 2010. However three offences under the 1861 Act remain in force today (in sections 34, 36 and 37)
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Reserved Matters
In the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
reserved matters and excepted matters are the areas of government policy where the UK Parliament had kept the power (jurisdiction) to make laws (legislate) in Scotland, Wales
Wales
and Northern Ireland. Each of these countries has been granted devolution within the UK; therefore some power has been delegated to them from the central government at Westminster
Westminster
and some has been withheld. They are also known as reserved matters and act as a guide for which areas are devolved to those three countries and which are not
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Scottish Parliament
Government (62)[1]     Scottish National Party
Scottish National Party
(62)Opposition (66)[1]     Conservative (31)      Labour (22)      Green (6)      Liberal Democrats (5)      Independents (2)Presiding Officer (1)     PO (1)Committees16Audit Equal Opportunities Europe and External Relations Finance Procedures Public Petitions Standards and Public Ap
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