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Transcendentalist
Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
is a philosophical movement that developed in the late 1820s and 1830s in the eastern United States.[1][2][3] It arose as a reaction to protest against the general state of intellectualism and spirituality at the time.[4] The doctrine of the Unitarian church as taught at Harvard Divinity School
Harvard Divinity School
was of particular interest. Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
emerged from "English and German Romanticism, the Biblical criticism of Johann Gottfried Herder
Johann Gottfried Herder
and Friedrich Schleiermacher, the skepticism of David Hume",[1] and the transcendental philosophy of Immanuel Kant
Immanuel Kant
and German Idealism
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Transcendence (other)
Transcendence, transcendent or transcendental may refer to:Contents1 Religion 2 Mathematics 3 Philosophy 4 Media 5 Other 6 See alsoReligion[edit] Transcendence (religion), the aspect of a god wholly independent of the material universe Transcendentals, religious and philosophical properties of beingMathematics[edit]Transcendental number, a number that is not the root of any polynomial with rational coefficients Transcendental element, an element of a field extension that is not the root of any polynomial with coefficients from the base field Transcendental function, a function which does not satisfy a polynomial equation whose coefficients are themselves polynomials
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Anthroposophy
Waldorf education Biodynamic agriculture Anthroposophical medicine Camphill Movement · EurythmyPhilosophyThe Philosophy
Philosophy
of Freedom · Social threefoldingv t e Anthroposophy
Anthroposophy
is the philosophy founded by Rudolf Steiner
Rudolf Steiner
that postulates the existence of an objective, intellectually comprehensible spiritual world, accessible to human experience through inner development. More specifically, it aims to develop faculties of perceptive imagination, inspiration and intuition through the cultivation of a form of thinking independent of sensory experience,[1][2] and to present the results thus derived in a manner subject to rational verification
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Jakob Böhme
Jakob Böhme
Jakob Böhme
(/ˈbeɪmə, ˈboʊ-/;[2] 1575 – 17 November 1624) was a German philosopher, Christian mystic, and Lutheran
Lutheran
Protestant theologian. He was considered an original thinker by many of his contemporaries[3] within the Lutheran
Lutheran
tradition, and his first book, commonly known as Aurora, caused a great scandal
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Emanuel Swedenborg
Emanuel Swedenborg
Emanuel Swedenborg
(/ˈswiːdənˌbɔːrɡ/;[1]  Swedish pronunciation (help·info); born Emanuel Swedberg on 29 January 1688;[2] died 29 March 1772) was a Swedish scientist, philosopher, theologian, revelator, mystic and founder of Swedenborgianism.[3] He is best known for his book on the afterlife, Heaven
Heaven
and Hell (1758).[4][5] Swedenborg had a prolific career as an inventor and scientist. In 1741, at 53, he entered into a spiritual phase in which he began to experience dreams and visions, beginning on Easter
Easter
Weekend, on 6 April 1744
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Pietism
Pietism
Pietism
(/ˈpaɪ.ɪtɪsm/, from the word piety) was an influential movement in Lutheranism
Lutheranism
that combined its emphasis on Biblical doctrine with the Reformed emphasis on individual piety and living a vigorous Christian life.[1] Although the movement was active exclusively within Lutheranism, it had a tremendous impact on Protestantism
Protestantism
worldwide, particularly in North America and Europe. Pietism
Pietism
originated in modern Germany
Germany
in the late 17th century with the work of Philipp Spener, a Lutheran theologian whose emphasis on personal transformation through spiritual rebirth and renewal, individual devotion and piety laid the foundations for the movement
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German Idealism
German idealism
German idealism
(also known as post-Kantian idealism, post-Kantian philosophy, or simply post-Kantianism)[1] was a philosophical movement that emerged in Germany
Germany
in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. It began as a reaction to Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. German idealism was closely linked with both Romanticism
Romanticism
and the revolutionary politics of the Enlightenment
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Liberal Christianity
Liberal Christianity, also known as liberal theology, covers diverse philosophically and biblically informed religious movements and ideas within Christianity
Christianity
from the late 18th century onward. Liberal does not refer to Progressive Christianity
Christianity
or to a political philosophy but to the philosophical and religious thought that developed and grew as a consequence of the Enlightenment. Liberal Christianity, broadly speaking, is a method of biblical hermeneutics, an undogmatic method of understanding God through the use of scripture by applying the same modern hermeneutics used to understand any ancient writings, symbols and scriptures. Liberal Christianity
Christianity
did not originate as a belief structure, and as such was not dependent upon any Church dogma or creedal doctrine. Unlike conservative varieties of Christianity, liberalism has no unified set of propositional beliefs
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Universalism
Universalism is a theological and philosophical concept that some ideas have universal application or applicability.[citation needed] A community that calls itself universalist may emphasize the universal principles of most religions and accept other religions in an inclusive manner, believing in a universal reconciliation between humanity and the divine.[citation needed] For example, some forms of Abrahamic religions
Abraham

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New Thought
The New Thought
New Thought
movement (also "Higher Thought"[1]) is a religious movement which developed in the United States
United States
in the 19th century, considered by many to have been derived from the unpublished writings of Phineas Quimby
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Theosophy
Theosophy, also known as Christian theosophy
Christian theosophy
and Boehmian theosophy, refers to a range of positions within Christianity
Christianity
which focus on the attainment of direct, unmediated knowledge of the nature of divinity and the origin and purpose of the universe. They have been characterized as mystical and occultist philosophies.[1] Theosophy
Theosophy
is considered part of Western esotericism, which believes that hidden knowledge or wisdom from the ancient past offers a path to enlightenment and salvation. The foundation of Christian theosophy
Christian theosophy
is usually attributed to the German philosopher Jakob Bohme. In 1875, the term "theosophy" was adopted by the Theosophical Society, a largely unrelated esoteric organisation which spawned a religious movement also called Theosophy
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Occultism
The occult (from the Latin
Latin
word occultus "clandestine, hidden, secret") is "knowledge of the hidden".[1] In common English usage, occult refers to "knowledge of the paranormal", as opposed to "knowledge of the measurable",[2] usually referred to as science
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Hermeticism
Hermeticism, also called Hermetism,[1][2] is a religious, philosophical, and esoteric tradition based primarily upon writings attributed to Hermes Trismegistus
Hermes Trismegistus
("Thrice Great").[3] These writings have greatly influenced the Western esoteric tradition
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Spiritualism
Spiritualism
Spiritualism
is the belief that the spirits of the dead have both the ability and the inclination to communicate with the living. The afterlife, or the "spirit world", is seen by spiritualists, not as a static place, but as one in which spirits continue to evolve. These two beliefs: that contact with spirits is possible, and that spirits are more advanced than humans, lead spiritualists to a third belief, that spirits are capable of providing useful knowledge about moral and ethical issues, as well as about the nature of God
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Esoteric Christianity
Esoteric Christianity
Christianity
(also known as Hermetic Christianity
Christianity
or Mystic Christianity) is an ensemble of spiritual currents which regard
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New Age
New Age
New Age
is a term applied to a range of spiritual or religious beliefs and practices that developed in Western nations during the 1970s. Precise scholarly definitions of the New Age
New Age
differ in their emphasis, largely as a result of its highly eclectic structure. Although analytically often considered to be religious, those involved in it typically prefer the designation of spiritual or Mind, Body, Spirit and rarely use the term "New Age" themselves
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