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TransFlash Memory Module
Secure Digital
Secure Digital
(SD) is a non-volatile memory card format developed by the SD Card Association
SD Card Association
(SDA) for use in portable devices. The standard was introduced in August 1999 by joint efforts between SanDisk, Panasonic
Panasonic
(Matsushita Electric) and Toshiba
Toshiba
as an improvement over MultiMediaCards (MMC),[1] and has become the industry standard. The three companies formed SD-3C, LLC, a company that licenses and enforces intellectual property rights associated with SD memory cards and SD host and ancillary products.[2] The companies also formed the SD Association
SD Association
(SDA), a non-profit organization, in January 2000 to promote and create SD Card standards.[3] SDA today has about 1,000 member companies
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SDHC (gene)
Secure Digital (SD) is a non-volatile memory card format developed by the SD Card Association (SDA) for use in portable devices. The standard was introduced in August 1999 by joint efforts between SanDisk, Panasonic (Matsushita Electric) and Toshiba as an improvement over MultiMediaCards (MMC),[1] and has become the industry standard. The three companies formed SD-3C, LLC, a company that licenses and enforces intellectual property rights associated with SD memory cards and SD host and ancillary products.[2] The companies also formed the SD Association (SDA), a non-profit organization, in January 2000 to promote and create SD Card standards.[3] SDA today has about 1,000 member companies
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Mbit/s
In telecommunications, data-transfer rate is the average number of bits (bitrate), characters or symbols (baudrate), or data blocks per unit time passing through a communication link in a data-transmission system. Common data rate units are multiples of bits per second (bit/s) and bytes per second (B/s)
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CD-ROM
A CD-ROM
CD-ROM
/ˌsiːˌdiːˈrɒm/ is a pre-pressed optical compact disc which contains data. The name is an acronym which stands for "Compact Disc Read-Only Memory". Computers can read CD-ROMs, but cannot write to CD-ROMs, which are not writable or erasable. During the 1990s, CD-ROMs were popularly used to distribute software for computers and video game consoles. Some CDs, called enhanced CDs, hold both computer data and audio with the latter capable of being played on a CD player, while data (such as software or digital video) is only usable on a computer (such as ISO 9660[2] format PC CD-ROMs). The CD-ROM
CD-ROM
format was developed by Japanese company Denon
Denon
in 1982
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MB/s
In telecommunications, data-transfer rate is the average number of bits (bitrate), characters or symbols (baudrate), or data blocks per unit time passing through a communication link in a data-transmission system. Common data rate units are multiples of bits per second (bit/s) and bytes per second (B/s)
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High-definition Video
High-definition video
High-definition video
is video of higher resolution and quality than standard-definition. While there is no standardized meaning for high-definition, generally any video image with considerably more than 480 vertical lines (North America) or 576 vertical lines (Europe) is considered high-definition. 480 scan lines is generally the minimum even though the majority of systems greatly exceed that. Images of standard resolution captured at rates faster than normal (60 frames/second North America, 50 fps Europe), by a high-speed camera may be considered high-definition in some contexts
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Full HD
1080p
1080p
(1920×1080 px; also known as Full HD or FHD and BT.709) is a set of HDTV high-definition video modes characterized by 1080 horizontal lines of vertical resolution;[1] the p stands for progressive scan, i.e. non-interlaced. The term usually assumes a widescreen aspect ratio of 16:9, implying a resolution of 2.1 megapixels. It is often marketed as full HD, to contrast 1080p with 720p
720p
resolution screens. 1080p
1080p
video signals are supported by ATSC standards
ATSC standards
in the United States and DVB standards
DVB standards
in Europe
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4K Resolution
4K resolution, also called 4K, refers to a horizontal screen display resolution in the order of 4,000 pixels.[1] There are several different 4K resolutions in the fields of digital television and digital cinematography. In television and consumer media, 4K UHD or UHD-1 is the dominant 4K standard. In the movie projection industry, Digital Cinema Initiatives (DCI 4K) is the dominant 4K standard. In 2015, the 4K television market share increased as prices fell dramatically during 2014[2] and 2015
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4K Video
4K resolution, also called 4K, refers to a horizontal screen display resolution in the order of 4,000 pixels.[1] There are several different 4K resolutions in the fields of digital television and digital cinematography. In television and consumer media, 4K UHD or UHD-1 is the dominant 4K standard. In the movie projection industry, Digital Cinema Initiatives (DCI 4K) is the dominant 4K standard. In 2015, the 4K television market share increased as prices fell dramatically during 2014[2] and 2015
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Multi-level Cell
In electronics, a multi-level cell (MLC) is a memory element capable of storing more than a single bit of information, compared to a single-level cell (SLC) which can store only one bit per memory element. Triple-level cells (TLC) and quad-level cells (QLC) are versions of MLC memory, which can store 3 and 4 bits per cell, respectively. Note that due to the convention, the name "multi-level cell" is sometimes used specifically to refer to the "two-level cell", which is slightly confusing. Overall, the memories are named as follows:SLC (1 bit per cell) - fastest, highest cost MLC (2 bits per cell) TLC (3 bits per cell) QLC (4 bits per cell) - slowest, least costExamples of MLC memories are MLC NAND flash, MLC PCM (phase change memory), etc. For example, in SLC NAND flash technology, each cell can exist in one of the two states, storing one bit of information per cell. Most MLC NAND flash memory has four possible states per cell, so it can store two bits of information per cell
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Tapeless Camcorder
A camcorder is an electronic device originally combining a video camera and a videocassette recorder. The earliest camcorders were tape-based, recording analog signals onto videotape cassettes
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CD And DVD Writing Speed
Original CD-ROM drives could read data at 150 kibibytes (150 × 210 bytes) per second. As faster drives were released, the write speeds and read speeds for optical discs were multiplied by manufacturers, far exceeding the drive speeds originally released onto the market. In order to represent this exponential growth in drive speeds, manufacturers used the symbol nX, whereby n is the multiple of the original speed
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KiB/s
In telecommunications, data-transfer rate is the average number of bits (bitrate), characters or symbols (baudrate), or data blocks per unit time passing through a communication link in a data-transmission system. Common data rate units are multiples of bits per second (bit/s) and bytes per second (B/s)
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Transcend Information
Transcend Information, Inc. (Chinese: 創見資訊股份有限公司; pinyin: Chuàngjiàn Zīxùn Gǔfèn Yǒuxiàn Gōngsī) is a Taiwanese company headquartered in Taipei, Taiwan
Taipei, Taiwan
that manufactures and distributes memory products. Transcend's product portfolio consists of over 2,000 products including memory modules, flash memory cards, USB flash drives, portable hard drives, multimedia products, solid state drives, dashcams, body cameras, personal cloud storage, card readers and accessories. It has offices in the United States, Germany, the Netherlands, United Kingdom, Japan, Hong Kong, China
China
and South Korea. It was the first Taiwanese memory module manufacturer to receive ISO 9001 certification. According to Gartner Research in 2013, Transcend was the world's No. 3 USB Flash Drive
USB Flash Drive
manufacturer, with 20% year-over-year market share growth, and the world's No
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Flash Memory
Flash memory
Flash memory
is an electronic (solid-state) non-volatile computer storage medium that can be electrically erased and reprogrammed. Toshiba
Toshiba
developed flash memory from E EPROM
EPROM
(electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) in the early 1980s and introduced it to the market in 1984. The two main types of flash memory are named after the NAND and NOR logic gates. The individual flash memory cells exhibit internal characteristics similar to those of the corresponding gates. While EPROMs had to be completely erased before being rewritten, NAND-type flash memory may be written and read in blocks (or pages) which are generally much smaller than the entire device
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Kingston Technology
Kingston Technology Corporation is an American, privately held, multinational computer technology corporation that develops, manufactures, sells and supports flash memory products and other computer-related memory products. Headquartered in Fountain Valley, California, United States, Kingston Technology employs more than 3,000 employees worldwide as of Q1 2016. The company has manufacturing and logistics facilities in the United States, United Kingdom, Ireland, Taiwan, and Mainland China. It is the largest independent producer of DRAM memory modules, currently owning 64% of the third-party worldwide DRAM module market share, according to IHS.[2] Kingston is arguably the second largest supplier of flash memory
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