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Traffic Signs Regulations And General Directions
The Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions (commonly abbreviated to TSRGD) is the law that sets out the design and conditions of use of official traffic signs that can be lawfully placed on or near roads in Great Britain
Great Britain
(England, Scotland
Scotland
and Wales) and the Isle of Man. The regulations were the result of the review of British road signage carried out by the Worboys Committee.Contents1 Versions 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksVersions[edit] The TSRGD was introduced on 1 January 1965 to implement the re-signing recommendations of the Worboys Committee
Worboys Committee
of 1963, with signage designs and typeface developed by Jock Kinneir
Jock Kinneir
and Margaret Calvert. Since 1964, TSRGD has been revised and re-issued several times since to introduce new signage rules and features reflecting changes in road operations
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Bilingual Sign
Multilingualism
Multilingualism
is the use of more than one language, either by an individual speaker or by a community of speakers. It is believed that multilingual speakers outnumber monolingual speakers in the world's population.[1] More than half of all Europeans
Europeans
claim to speak at least one language other than their mother tongue;[2] nevertheless, many of these are monoscriptual. Multilingualism
Multilingualism
is becoming a social phenomenon governed by the needs of globalization and cultural openness.[3] Owing to the ease of access to information facilitated by the Internet, individuals' exposure to multiple languages is becoming increasingly frequent, thereby promoting a need to acquire additional languages. People who speak several languages are also called polyglots.[4] Multilingual speakers have acquired and maintained at least one language during childhood, the so-called first language (L1)
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Jock Kinneir
Richard "Jock" Kinneir (11 February 1917 – 23 August 1994) was a typographer and graphic designer who, with colleague Margaret Calvert, designed many of the road signs used throughout the United Kingdom. Their system has become a model for modern road signage. Kinneir was born in Hampshire
Hampshire
in 1917. He studied engraving at the Chelsea School of Art
Chelsea School of Art
from 1935 to 1939. After World War II Kinneir was employed as an exhibition designer by the Central Office of Information. He next worked for the Design Research Unit, and then opened his own practice in 1956. He also taught part-time at the Chelsea School of Art. Kinneir's first big commission was the design of the signage for Gatwick Airport. He chose one of his students at Chelsea, Margaret Calvert, to assist him
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Great Britain
Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
off the northwest coast of continental Europe. With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), Great Britain
Great Britain
is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world.[5][note 1] In 2011 the island had a population of about 61 million people, making it the world's third-most populous island after Java
Java
in Indonesia and Honshu
Honshu
in Japan.[7][8] The island of Ireland
Ireland
is situated to the west of it, and together these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands, form the British Isles
British Isles
archipelago.[9] The island is dominated by a maritime climate with quite narrow temperature differences between seasons
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Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984
Regulation is an abstract concept of management of complex systems according to a set of rules and trends. In systems theory, these types of rules exist in various fields of biology and society, but the term has slightly different meanings according to context
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Highways Act 1980
The Highways Act 1980 (1980 c.66) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
dealing with the management and operation of the road network in England and Wales. It consolidated with amendments several earlier pieces of legislation. Many amendments relate only to changes of highway authority, to include new unitary councils and national parks. By virtue of the Local Government (Wales) Act 1994
Local Government (Wales) Act 1994
and the Environment Act 1995, most references to local authority are taken to also include Welsh councils and national park authorities. By virtue of the National Assembly for Wales
National Assembly for Wales
(Transfer of Functions) Order 1999 most references to 'the Minister' are taken to include the National Assembly for Wales
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Margaret Calvert
Margaret Vivienne Calvert[1] OBE (born 1936) is a British typographer and graphic designer who, with colleague Jock Kinneir, designed many of the road signs used throughout the United Kingdom, as well as the Transport font used on road signs, the Rail Alphabet
Rail Alphabet
font used on the British railway system, and an early version of the signs used in airports. The typeface developed by Calvert and Kinneir was further developed into New Transport and used for the single domain GOV.UK website in the United Kingdom.[2] Born in South Africa, Calvert moved to England in 1950, where she studied at St Paul's Girls' School
St Paul's Girls' School
and at the Chelsea College of Art. Kinneir, her tutor there, asked her to help him design the signs for Gatwick Airport, where they chose the black on yellow scheme for the signs after researching the most effective combination.[3] In 1957, Kinneir was appointed head of signs for Britain's roads
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
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Wales
Wales
Wales
(/ˈweɪlz/ ( listen); Welsh: Cymru [ˈkəmri] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the island of Great Britain.[8] It is bordered by England
England
to the east, the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel
Bristol Channel
to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon
Snowdon
(Yr Wyddfa), its highest summit
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Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Isle Of Man
The Isle of Man
Isle of Man
(Manx: Ellan Vannin [ˈɛlʲən ˈvanɪn]), also known simply as Mann (/mæn/; Manx: Mannin [ˈmanɪn]), is a self-governing British Crown dependency in the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
between the islands of Great Britain and Ireland. The head of state is Queen Elizabeth II, who holds the title of Lord of Mann
Lord of Mann
and is represented by a Lieutenant Governor. Defence is the responsibility of the United Kingdom. Ranked by the World Bank
World Bank
as the 5th richest nation in the world by GDP per capita,[6] the largest sectors are insurance and eGaming with 17% of GNP each, followed by ICT and banking with 9% each.[7] The island has been inhabited since before 6500 BC. Gaelic cultural influence began in the 5th century and the Manx language, a branch of the Gaelic languages, emerged
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Road Signs In Georgia (country)
Road signs in Georgia are similar to the Russian road sign system that ensure that transport vehicles move safely and orderly, as well as to inform the participants of traffic built-in graphic icons
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Road Signs In Mauritius
Road signs in Mauritius
Mauritius
are standardised traffic signs used in Mauritius
Mauritius
according to the Traffic Signs Regulations 1990. They are heavily modelled on road signs in the United Kingdom, since Mauritius is a former British colony. Mauritius
Mauritius
has left-hand traffic.Contents1 Signing system 2 Priority signs 3 Warning signs 4 Prohibitionary signs 5 Mandatory signs 6 Information signs 7 Other signs 8 ReferencesSigning system[edit] The traffic sign are divided into three classes; circles gives orders, triangles warns of possible dangers and rectangles gives information. Different colours are use within these shapes; blue circles are mandatory signs, it give positive instructions, while red circles are prohibitory signs, it give negative instructions. Blue rectangles give general information while green rectangles are use for direction sign on main roads
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Logo Sign
Logo
Logo
signs (also known as specific service signs or Logo
Logo
service signs, or colloquially as Big Blue
Blue
Signs) are blue road signs used on freeways that display the logos of businesses prior to an interchange. Typically, a business pays fees to a transportation department (or to a subcontractor of a transportation department such as Lamar Advertising subsidiary Interstate Logos) to have their logos displayed on a large panel alongside other businesses.Contents1 History1.1 In the United States 1.2 In Canada2 References 3 External linksHistory[edit] In the United States[edit] In the United States, logo signs were permitted on rural Interstates in 1965 as part of the Highway Beautification Act. Originally, such signs were limited to the following categories: gas, food, lodging, and camping. The 1976 amendments to the Highway Beautification Act expanded the program to federal-aid primary rural highways
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Priority To The Right
Priority to the right
Priority to the right
is a right-of-way system, in which the driver of a vehicle is required to give way to vehicles approaching from the right at intersections. The system is stipulated in Article 18.4.a of the Vienna Convention on Road Traffic
Vienna Convention on Road Traffic
for countries where traffic keeps to the right and applies to all intersections where it is not overridden by priority signs (uncontrolled intersections), including side roads and roundabouts (but not paths or earth-tracks).Contents1 Usage 2 Signage 3 See also 4 ReferencesUsage[edit] The system is widely used in countries with right-hand traffic, including most European countries. What varies, however, is the prevalence of uncontrolled intersections. In some countries, the right of way at virtually all but the most minor road junctions is controlled by the display of priority vs
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