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Trading Signals
A forex signal is a suggestion for entering a trade on a currency pair, usually at a specific price and time.[1] The signal is generated either by a human analyst or an automated Forex robot supplied to a subscriber of the forex signal service
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Foreign Exchange Market
The foreign exchange market (Forex, FX, or currency market) is a global decentralized or over-the-counter (OTC) market for the trading of currencies. This market determines the foreign exchange rate. It includes all aspects of buying, selling and exchanging currencies at current or determined prices. In terms of trading volume, it is by far the largest market in the world, followed by the Credit market.[1] The main participants in this market are the larger international banks. Financial centers around the world function as anchors of trading between a wide range of multiple types of buyers and sellers around the clock, with the exception of weekends. Since currencies are always traded in pairs, the foreign exchange market does not set a currency's absolute value but rather determines its relative value by setting the market price of one currency if paid for with another
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Ichimoku
Ichimoku Kinko Hyo (一目均衡表, Ichimoku Kinkō Hyō) usually just called ichimoku is a technical analysis method that builds on candlestick charting to improve the accuracy of forecast price moves.[1] It was developed in the late 1930s by Goichi Hosoda (細田悟一, Hosoda Goichi), a Japanese journalist who used to be known as Ichimoku Sanjin, which can be translated as "what a man in the mountain sees".[citation needed] He spent 30 years perfecting the technique before releasing his findings to the general public in the late 1960s.[2] Ichimoku Kinko Hyo translates to one glance equilibrium chart or instant look at the balance chart and is sometimes referred to as "one glance cloud chart" based on the unique "clouds" that feature in ichimoku charting.[3][4] Ichimoku is a moving average-based trend identification system and because it contains more data points than standard candlestick charts, it provides a clearer picture of potential price action.[5] The main difference between
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Foreign Exchange Reserves
Foreign-exchange reserves
Foreign-exchange reserves
(also called forex reserves or FX reserves) is money or other assets held by a central bank or other monetary authority so that it can pay if need be its liabilities, such as the currency issued by the central bank, as well as the various bank reserves deposited with the central bank by the government and other financial institutions.[1] Reserves are held in one or more reserve currencies, mostly the
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Foreign Exchange Hedge
A foreign exchange hedge (also called a FOREX hedge) is a method used by companies to eliminate or "hedge" their foreign exchange risk resulting from transactions in foreign currencies (see foreign exchange derivative). This is done using either the cash flow hedge or the fair value method. The accounting rules for this are addressed by both the International Financial Reporting Standards
International Financial Reporting Standards
(IFRS) and by the US Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (US GAAP) as well as other national accounting standards. A foreign exchange hedge transfers the foreign exchange risk from the trading or investing company to a business that carries the risk, such as a bank. There is cost to the company for setting up a hedge
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Foreign Exchange Controls
Foreign exchange controls
Foreign exchange controls
are various forms of controls imposed by a government on the purchase/sale of foreign currencies by residents or on the purchase/sale of local currency by nonresidents. Common foreign exchange controls include:Banning the use of foreign currency within the country Banning locals from possessing foreign currency Restricting currency exchange to government-approved exchangers Fixed exchange rates Restrictions on the amount of currency that may be imported or exportedCountries with foreign exchange controls are also known as "Article 14 countries," after the provision in the International Monetary Fund agreement allowing exchange controls for transitional economies. Such controls used to be common in most countries, particularly poorer ones, until the 1990s when free trade and globalization started a trend towards economic liberalization
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Scalping (trading)
Scalping, when used in reference to trading in securities, commodities and foreign exchange, may refer toa legitimate method of arbitrage of small price gaps created by the bid-ask spread. a fraudulent form of market manipulationContents1 Arbitrage1.1 How scalping works 1.2 Principles 1.3 Different parties and spreads1.3.1 Who pays the spreads (costs) 1.3.2 Who receives the spreads (bonuses)1.4 Factors affecting scalping2 Fraudulent use by adviser 3 References 4 External linksArbitrage[edit] How scalping works[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (March 2010) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Scalping is the shortest time frame in trading and it exploits small changes in currency prices.[1] Scalpers attempt to act like traditional market makers or specialists
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Trade Idea
Trade ideas (or trading ideas, or "Electronic Alpha-Capture") are investment ideas, typically equity related, ("long" i.e. buy, or "short" i.e. sell) which are sent by institutional stockbrokers to their institutional clients (i.e. this is not a service provided to private clients). They typically propose a trade in a specific stock and are developed by the individual idea author’s (e.g. a salesman) own knowledge of their client’s particular area of investment interest, so will take into account: the client’s investment style, portfolio size and the sector and geographic focus. Recipients of trade ideas can be hedge funds, bank’s proprietary trading desks and money managers. Trade ideas are sent to the client with a recommendation to buy or sell, an investment value (e.g. $2 million) and often a timeframe and an indication of level of conviction
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Candlestick Chart
A candlestick chart (also called Japanese candlestick chart) is a style of financial chart used to describe price movements of a security, derivative, or currency. Each "candlestick" typically shows one day, thus a one-month chart may show the 20 trading days as 20 "candlesticks".[1] Shorter intervals than one day are common on computer charts, longer are possible. It is like a combination of line-chart and a bar-chart: each bar represents all four important pieces of information for that day: The open, the close, the high and the low. Being densely packed with information, they tend to represent trading patterns over short periods of time, often a few days or a few trading sessions.[2] Candlestick charts are most often used in technical analysis of equity and currency price patterns
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Price Action Trading
The price action is a method of billable negotiation in the analysis of the basic movements of the price, to generate signals of entry and exit in trades and that stands out for its reliability and for not requiring the use of indicators. It is a form of technical analysis, since it ignores the fundamental factors of a security and looks primarily at the security's price history. What differentiates it from most forms of technical analysis is that its main focus is the relation of a security's current price to its past prices as opposed to values derived from that price history. This past history includes swing highs and swing lows, trend lines, and support and resistance levels. At its most simplistic, it attempts to describe the human thought processes invoked by experienced, non-disciplinary traders as they observe and trade their markets.[1][2][3][4] Price action is simply how prices change - the action of price
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SMS
SMS
SMS
(Short Message Service) is a text messaging service component of most telephone, World Wide Web, and mobile device systems.[1] It uses standardized communication protocols to enable mobile devices to exchange short text messages. An intermediary service can facilitate a text-to-voice conversion to be sent to landlines.[2] SMS
SMS
was the most widely used data application, with an estimated 3.5 billion active users, or about 80% of all mobile subscribers, at the end of 2010.[1] SMS, as used on modern devices, originated from radio telegraphy in radio memo pagers that used standardized phone protocols. These were defined in 1985 as part of the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) series of standards.[3] The protocols allowed users to send and receive messages of up to 160 alpha-numeric characters to and from GSM mobiles
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Fundamental Analysis
Fundamental analysis, in accounting and finance, is the analysis of a business's financial statements (usually to analyze the business's assets, liabilities, and earnings); health;[1] and its competitors and markets. When applied to futures and forex, it focuses on the overall state of the economy, and considers factors including interest rates, production, earnings, employment, GDP, housing, manufacturing and management. When analyzing a stock, futures contract, or currency using fundamental analysis, there are two basic approaches that can be used: bottom up analysis and top down analysis.[2] These terms are used to distinguish such analysis from other types of investment analysis, such as quantitative and technical. Fundamental analysis
Fundamental analysis
is performed on historical and present data, but with the goal of making financial forecasts
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Technical Analysis
In finance, technical analysis is an analysis methodology for forecasting the direction of prices through the study of past market data, primarily price and volume.[1] Behavioral economics
Behavioral economics
and quantitative analysis use many of the same tools of technical analysis,[2][3][4] which, being an aspect of active management, stands in contradiction to much of modern portfolio theory
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Foreign Exchange Fraud
Foreign exchange fraud is any trading scheme used to defraud traders by convincing them that they can expect to gain a high profit by trading in the foreign exchange market. Currency
Currency
trading became a common form of fraud in early 2008, according to Michael Dunn of the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission.[1] The foreign exchange market is at best a zero-sum game,[2] meaning that whatever one trader gains, another loses
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