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Trace Gas Orbiter
ESA
ESA
mission insignia for the ExoMars
ExoMars
2016 launch, featuring the Trace Gas Orbiter (left) and Schiaparelli (right).
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Hertz
The hertz (symbol: Hz) is the derived unit of frequency in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI) and is defined as one cycle per second.[1] It is named for Heinrich Rudolf Hertz, the first person to provide conclusive proof of the existence of electromagnetic waves. Hertz
Hertz
are commonly expressed in multiples: kilohertz (103 Hz, kHz), megahertz (106 Hz, MHz), gigahertz (109 Hz, GHz), and terahertz (1012 Hz, THz). Some of the unit's most common uses are in the description of sine waves and musical tones, particularly those used in radio- and audio-related applications
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Barack Obama
Pre-presidency Illinois
Illinois
State Senator 2004 DNC keynote address U.S
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NASA
The National Aeronautics
Aeronautics
and Space Administration ( NASA
NASA
/ˈnæsə/) is an independent agency of the executive branch of the United States federal government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research.[note 1] President Dwight D. Eisenhower
Dwight D. Eisenhower
established NASA
NASA
in 1958[10] with a distinctly civilian (rather than military) orientation encouraging peaceful applications in space science
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Atlas Rocket
Atlas is a family of American missiles and space launch vehicles. The original Atlas missile was designed in the late 1950s and produced by the Convair
Convair
Division of General Dynamics,[2] to be used as an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). It was a liquid propellant rocket burning liquid oxygen and RP-1
RP-1
fuel in three engines configured in an unusual "stage-and-a-half" or "Parallel Staging" design: its two outboard booster engines were jettisoned during ascent, while its center sustainer engine, propellant tanks and other structural elements were retained through orbital insertion (for orbital flights). The missiles saw only brief ICBM service, and the last squadron was taken off operational alert in 1965. From 1962 to 1963, Atlas boosters launched the first four American astronauts to orbit the Earth whereas Redstone preceded Atlas II
Atlas II
with two sub-orbital launches
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Briz (rocket Stage)
The Briz-K, Briz-KM and Briz-M (Russian: Бриз-К, КM and M meaning Breeze-K, KM and M) are Russian liquid-propellant rocket orbit insertion upper stages manufactured by Khrunichev
Khrunichev
State Research and Production Space Center and used on the Proton-M, Angara A5
Angara A5
or Rokot, one of Russia's smaller l
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Proton (rocket Family)
Proton (Russian: Протон) (formal designation: UR-500) is an expendable launch system used for both commercial and Russian government space launches. The first Proton rocket was launched in 1965. Modern versions of the launch system are still in use as of 2017, making it one of the most successful heavy boosters in the history of spaceflight. All Protons are built at the Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center plant in Moscow, transported to the Baikonur Cosmodrome, brought to the launch pad horizontally, and raised into vertical position for launch.[3][4] As with many Soviet rockets, the names of recurring payloads became associated with the Proton. The moniker "Proton" originates from a series of similarly named scientific satellites, which were among the rocket's first payloads
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Roscosmos
The Roscosmos
Roscosmos
State Corporation for Space Activities (Russian: Государственная корпорация по космической деятельности «Роскосмос»), commonly known as Roscosmos
Roscosmos
(Russian: Роскосмос), is a governmental agency respons
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Orbiter
An orbiter is a space probe that orbits a planet or other astronomical object.Contents1 Examples1.1 Asteroids 1.2 Earth 1.3 Jupiter 1.4 Mars 1.5 Mercury 1.6 Moon 1.7 Saturn 1.8 Sun 1.9 Venus2 See also 3 External linksExamples[edit] Asteroids[edit] NEAR Shoemaker
NEAR Shoemaker
(orbited 433 Eros, eventually landed but was not designed to do so) Hayabusa
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2013 United States Federal Budget
September 28, 2012 (Pub.L. 112-175) March 26, 2013 (Pub.L. 113-6)Total revenue $2.902 trillion (requested)[2] $2.77 trillion (actual)[3][4] 16.7% of GDP (actual)[5]Total expenditures $3.803 trillion (requested) $3.45 trillion (actual)[3] 20.8% of GDP (actual)[5]Deficit $901 billion (requested) 5.5% of GDP $680 billion (actual)[3] 4.1% of GDP (actual)[5]Debt $16.72 trillion (at fiscal end) 100.8% of GDP[6]GDP $16.582 trillion[5]Website Office of Management and Budget‹ 2012 2014 ›The 2013 United States federal budget is the budget to fund government operations for the fiscal year 2013, which is October 2012–September 2013
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Epoch (astronomy)
In astronomy, an epoch is a moment in time used as a reference point for some time-varying astronomical quantity, such as the celestial coordinates or elliptical orbital elements of a celestial body, because these are subject to perturbations and vary with time.[1] These time-varying astronomical quantities might include, for example, the mean longitude or mean anomaly of a body, the node of its orbit relative to a reference plane, the direction of the apogee or aphelion of its orbit, or the size of the major axis of its orbit. The main use of astronomical quantities specified in this way is to calculate other relevant parameters of motion, in order to predict future positions and velocities
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Biomolecule
A biomolecule or biological molecule is a loosely used term for molecules and ions that are present in organisms, essential to some typically biological process such as cell division, morphogenesis, or development.[1] Biomolecules include large macromolecules (or polyanions) such as proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids, as well as small molecules such as primary metabolites, secondary metabolites, and natural products. A more general name for this class of material is biological materials. Biomolecules are usually endogenous but may also be exogenous. For example, pharmaceutical drugs may be natural products or semisynthetic (biopharmaceuticals) or they may be totally synthetic. Biology
Biology
and its subsets of biochemistry and molecular biology study biomolecules and their reactions. Most biomolecules are organic compounds, and just four elements—oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen—make up 96% of the human body's mass
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Atlas V
Atlas V
Atlas V
(pronounced "atlas five") is an expendable launch system in the Atlas rocket family. It was formerly operated by Lockheed Martin and is now operated by United Launch Alliance
United Launch Alliance
(ULA), a joint venture with Boeing. Each Atlas V
Atlas V
rocket uses a Russian-built RD-180
RD-180
engine burning kerosene and liquid oxygen to power its first stage and an American-built RL10
RL10
engine burning liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen to power its Centaur upper stage. The RD-180
RD-180
engines are provided by RD Amross, while Aerojet Rocketdyne
Aerojet Rocketdyne
provides both the RL10
RL10
engines and the strap-on boosters used in some configurations. The standard payload fairing sizes are 4 or 5 meters in diameter and of various lengths
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Soyuz (rocket Family)
Soyuz (Russian: Союз, meaning "union", GRAU index
GRAU index
11A511) is a family of expendable launch systems developed by OKB-1
OKB-1
and manufactured by Progress Rocket Space Centre
Progress Rocket Space Centre
in Samara, Russia. With over 1700 flights since its debut in 1966, the Soyuz launch vehicle is the most frequently used launch vehicle in the world.[1] After the U.S
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Geochemical
Geochemistry
Geochemistry
is the science that uses the tools and principles of chemistry to explain the mechanisms behind major geological systems such as the Earth's crust
Earth's crust
and its oceans.[1]:1 The realm of geochemistry extends beyond
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Volcanism
Volcanism
Volcanism
is the phenomenon of eruption of molten rock (magma) onto the surface of the Earth or a solid-surface planet or moon, where lava, pyroclastics and volcanic gases erupt through a break in the surface called a vent.[1] It includes all phenomena resulting from and causing magma within the crust or mantle of the body, to rise through the crust and form volcanic rocks on the surface.Contents1 Volcanic processes 2 Driving forces of volcanism 3 Aspects of volcanism3.1 Volcanoes 3.2 Intrusions 3.3 Earthquakes 3.4 Hydrothermal
Hydrothermal
vents 3.5 Volcanic winter4 Forming rocks 5 Volcanism
Volcanism
on other bodies 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksVolcanic processes[edit]Non-viscous lava during an effusive eruption of Kīlauea Magma
Magma
from the mantle or lower crust rises through its crust towards the surface
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