HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Tozama Daimyō
A tozama daimyō (外様大名, [1], "outside daimyō") was a daimyō who was considered an outsider by the rulers of Japan. The term came into use in the Kamakura period
Kamakura period
and continued until the end of the Edo period. Edo period[edit] The daimyō who submitted to the Tokugawa shogunate
Tokugawa shogunate
after the Battle of Sekigahara—who became Tokugawa vassals only after the battle—were classified as tozama. They included both daimyō who fought with the Tokugawa and those who fought against them. Many of the largest fiefs were ruled by tozama. The biggest was the Maeda clan of Kaga with a value of 1,000,000 koku. Others included the Shimazu clan of Satsuma, the Mori, the Date, Hachisuka, and the Uesugi
[...More...]

"Tozama Daimyō" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ōuetsu Reppan Dōmei
The Ōuetsu Reppan Dōmei
Ōuetsu Reppan Dōmei
(奥羽越列藩同盟, Alliance of the domains of Mutsu, Dewa, and Echigo) was a Japanese military-political coalition established and disestablished over the course of several months in early to mid-1868 during the Boshin War. Its flag was either a white interwoven five-pointed star on a black field, or a black interwoven five-pointed star on a white field. It is also known as the Northern Alliance (北部同盟, Hokubu Doumei).Contents1 History 2 Members of the Ōuetsu Reppan Dōmei 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The Alliance centered on the Sendai, Yonezawa, and Nihonmatsu domains, and drew together nearly all domains from the provinces of Mutsu and Dewa, several domains of northern Echigo
Echigo
Province, and even the Matsumae Domain of Ezo (modern-day Hokkaidō)
[...More...]

"Ōuetsu Reppan Dōmei" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hachisuka Clan
The Hachisuka clan
Hachisuka clan
(蜂須賀氏, Hachisuka-shi) are descendants of Emperor Seiwa
Emperor Seiwa
(850-880) and are a branch of the Ashikaga clan
Ashikaga clan
and the Shiba clan
Shiba clan
(Seiwa Genji). Ashikaga Ieuji (13th century), son of Ashikaga Yasuuji, was the first who adopted the name of Shiba. The Shiba were shugo (governors) of Echizen, Owari and other provinces, and were during the Ashikaga shogunate one of three families (Shiba, Hosokawa and Hatakeyama) from which the Kyoto-kanryo (prime minister of the shogun) could be chosen. Shiba Masaaki, the descendant of Shiba Takatsune (+ 1367), established himself in Hachisuka, near Kiso river at the border of Owari and Mino provinces, whence he took the name Hachisuka. In the 16th century, the Hachisuka clan
Hachisuka clan
came to prominence thanks to its head, Hachisuka Koroku
[...More...]

"Hachisuka Clan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aizu Han
Aizu
Aizu
(会津) is the westernmost of the three regions of Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, the other two regions being Nakadōri
Nakadōri
in the central area of the prefecture and Hamadōri
Hamadōri
in the east. As of October 1, 2010, it had a population of 291,838.[2] The principal city of the area is Aizuwakamatsu. During the Edo period, Aizu
Aizu
was a feudal domain known as Aizu
Aizu
Domain (会津藩, Aizu-han).[3] It was part of Mutsu Province; the area once was part of Iwase Province
Iwase Province
in the 8th century and, before the prefectural system, Iwashiro Province
[...More...]

"Aizu Han" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Meiji Oligarchy
The Meiji oligarchy
Meiji oligarchy
was the name used to describe the new ruling class of Meiji period
Meiji period
Japan. In Japanese, the Meiji oligarchy
Meiji oligarchy
is called the domain clique (藩閥, hambatsu). The members of this class were adherents of kokugaku and believed they were the creators of a new order as grand as that established by Japan's original founders. Two of the major figures of this group were Ōkubo Toshimichi
Ōkubo Toshimichi
(1832–78), son of a Satsuma retainer, and Satsuma samurai Saigō Takamori
Saigō Takamori
(1827–77), who had joined forces with Chōshū, Tosa, and Hizen to overthrow the Tokugawa shogunate. Okubo became minister of finance and Saigō a field marshal; both were imperial councillors
[...More...]

"Meiji Oligarchy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rōjū
The Rōjū (老中), usually translated as Elder, was one of the highest-ranking government posts under the Tokugawa shogunate
Tokugawa shogunate
of Edo period Japan. The term refers either to individual Elders, or to the Council of Elders as a whole; under the first two shōguns, there were only two Rōjū. The number was then increased to five, and later reduced to four
[...More...]

"Rōjū" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Matsumae Takahiro
Matsumae Takahiro
Matsumae Takahiro
(松前 崇広, December 10, 1829 – June 9, 1866) was a Japanese daimyo of the Edo
Edo
period, who ruled the Matsumae Domain. Though he was a tozama daimyo, he served in the Tokugawa Shogunate as a rōjū. His court title was Izu no kami.Contents1 Youth 2 Rise to Power as Rōjū 3 Death 4 Media 5 ReferencesYouth[edit] Takahiro, whose childhood name was Tamekichi, was born at Fukuyama Castle in Ezo. He was the 6th son of Matsumae Akihiro, the 9th lord of Matsumae. At age 4, he was sent to the family estate in Edo. In an act most unusual for a daimyo's son, his education included the study of the English language. He succeeded to lordship of Matsumae in 1849. Rise to Power as Rōjū[edit] Takahiro was appointed as rōjū in November 1864; this was a post that was unheard of for a tozama daimyo
[...More...]

"Matsumae Takahiro" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fudai Daimyō
Fudai daimyō
Fudai daimyō
(譜代大名) was a class of daimyōs who were hereditary vassals of the Tokugawa in Edo-period Japan.[1] It was primarily the fudai who filled the ranks of the Tokugawa administration.Contents1 Origins 2 In the Edo
Edo
period 3 Bakumatsu and beyond 4 Notes 5 ReferencesOrigins[edit] Many of the families who formed the ranks of the fudai daimyōs were families which had served the Tokugawa clan since before its rise to national primacy. Some of these include the Honda, Sakai, Sakakibara, Ii, Itakura, and Mizuno clans. Tokugawa Ieyasu's "Four Great Generals"—Honda Tadakatsu, Sakakibara Yasumasa, Sakai Tadatsugu, and Ii Naomasa—were all pre- Edo period
Edo period
fudai, and went on to become fudai daimyōs
[...More...]

"Fudai Daimyō" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kyūshū
Kyushu
Kyushu
(九州, Kyūshū, literally "Nine Provinces"; Japanese: [kʲɯːꜜɕɯː]) is the third largest island of Japan
Japan
and most southwesterly of its four main islands.[2] Its alternative ancient names include Kyūkoku (九国, "Nine Provinces"), Chinzei (鎮西, "West of the Pacified Area"), and Tsukushi-no-shima (筑紫島, "Island of Tsukushi"). The historical regional name Saikaidō
Saikaidō
(西海道, lit
[...More...]

"Kyūshū" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tokugawa Iemitsu
Tokugawa Iemitsu
Tokugawa Iemitsu
(徳川 家光 August 12, 1604 – June 8, 1651) was the third shōgun of the Tokugawa dynasty. He was the eldest son of Tokugawa Hidetada, and the grandson of Tokugawa Ieyasu. Iemitsu ruled from 1623 to 1651, and during this period he crucified Christians, expelled all Europeans from Japan
Japan
and closed the borders of the country, a foreign politics policy that continued for over 200 years after its institution. It is debatable whether Iemitsu can be considered a kinslayer for making his younger brother Tadanaga commit suicide by seppuku
[...More...]

"Tokugawa Iemitsu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vassal
A vassal[1] is a person regarded as having a mutual obligation to a lord or monarch, in the context of the feudal system in medieval Europe. The obligations often included military support and mutual protection, in exchange for certain privileges, usually including land held as a tenant or fief.[2] The term is applied to similar arrangements in other feudal societies. In contrast, fealty (fidelitas) was sworn, unconditional loyalty to a monarch.[3]Contents1 Western vassalage 2 Difference between "vassal" and "vassal state" 3 Feudal
Feudal
Japanese equivalents 4 See also4.1 Similar terms5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksWestern vassalage[edit] In fully developed vassalage, the lord and the vassal would take part in a commendation ceremony composed of two parts, the homage and the fealty, including the use of Christian sacraments to show its sacred importance
[...More...]

"Vassal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Japan
Coordinates: 35°N 136°E / 35°N 136°E / 35; 136Japan 日本国 Nippon-koku or Nihon-kokuFlagImperial SealAnthem: "Kimigayo" 君が代"His Imperial Majesty's Reign"[2][3] Government
Government
Seal of JapanGo-Shichi no Kiri (五七桐)Area controlled by Japan
[...More...]

"Japan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Uesugi Clan
The Uesugi clan
Uesugi clan
(上杉氏, Uesugi-shi) was a Japanese samurai clan, descended from the Fujiwara clan
Fujiwara clan
and particularly notable for their power in the Muromachi and Sengoku periods (roughly 14th through 17th centuries).[1] The clan was split into three branch families, the Ōgigayatsu, Inukake and Yamanouchi Uesugi, which boasted considerable influence. The Uesugi are perhaps best known for Uesugi Kenshin
Uesugi Kenshin
(1530–1578), originally from the Nagao clan, one of Sengoku's more prominent warlords
[...More...]

"Uesugi Clan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Date Family
The Date clan (伊達氏, Date-shi) is a Japanese samurai kin group.[1]Contents1 History 2 Head Clan 3 Date clan genealogy3.1 Clan temple in Edo 3.2 Clan shrine in Sendai4 Notable clan members4.1 Fourteenth century 4.2 Fifteenth century 4.3 Sixteenth century 4.4 Seventeenth century 4.5 Eighteenth century 4.6 Nineteenth century and after Meiji restoration 4.7 Twentieth century 4.8 Side branches5 Retainers and vassals5.1 Oniniwa 5.2 Katakura 5.3 Rusu 5.4 Watari 5.5 Shiroishi6 Popular culture 7 See also 8 Notes 9 ReferencesHistory[edit] The Date family was founded in the early Kamakura period (1185–1333) by Isa Tomomune who originally came from the Isa district of Hitachi Province (now Ibaraki Prefecture), and was a descendant of Fujiwara no Uona (721–783) in the sixteenth generation
[...More...]

"Date Family" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Boshin War
1868 Imperial Court Tozama:Satchō Alliance Satsuma Domain Chōshū DomainOther tozama daimyōs: Tosa Domain Hiroshima Domain Tsu Domain Saga Domain Ōgaki Domain Hirosaki Domain Kuroishi Domain Yodo Domain1868 Shogunate Aizu
Aizu
Domain Takamatsu Domain Northern Alliance Jōzai Domain Tsuruoka Domain Kuwana Domain Matsuyama Domain Defected: Tsu Domain Yodo Domain Ōgaki Domain1869  Empire of JapanSupported by:  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland1869 Republic of EzoSupported by:  French EmpireCommanders and leaders
[...More...]

"Boshin War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.