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Toyota Century
The Toyota
Toyota
Century (Japanese: トヨタ センチュリー, Toyota Senchurī) is a large four-door limousine produced mainly for the Japanese market, serving as Toyota's flagship car within Japan; globally the unrelated Lexus LS
Lexus LS
series is Toyota's flagship luxury model outside Japan. Production of the Century began in 1967, and the model received only minor changes until a redesign in 1997. The Century derived its name from the 100th birthday of Sakichi Toyoda (born 14 February 1867), the founder of Toyota
Toyota
Industries. It is often used by the Imperial House of Japan, the Prime Minister of Japan, senior Japanese government leaders, and high-level executive businessmen. The Century is comparable in purpose to the Austin Princess/Daimler DS420, Cadillac Series 70, Mercedes-Benz 600, Chinese Red Flag, Rolls-Royce, and Russian ZIS/ZIL limousines
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C Pillar
Pillars are the vertical or near vertical supports of a car's window area or greenhouse—designated respectively as the A, B, C or (in larger cars) D-pillar, moving from the front to rear, in profile view. The consistent alphabetical designation of a car's pillars provides a common reference for design discussion and critical communication
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Higashi-Fuji Technical Center
Higashi-Fuji Technical Center (東富士研究所, Higashi-Fuji Kenkyūjo) is a Toyota
Toyota
research and development facility in Susono, Shizuoka, Japan.[3][4] The facility was established in November 1966.[1][5] Notably, the center contains an advanced driving simulation housed inside a 7 meters (23 feet) diameter dome with an actual car inside.[6] The simulator is used to analyse driver behaviors in order to improve safety.[6] Higashi-Fuji also includes a crash test building.[7] References[edit]^ a b c "Higashifuji Technical Center: Facility Overview" (PDF). Toyota. 2010. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 December 2013. Retrieved 27 December 2013.  ^ "Japanese Facilities". Toyota. Retrieved December 27, 2013.  ^ " Toyota
Toyota
Develops World-class Driving Simulator" (Press release). Toyota. November 26, 2007. Retrieved December 27, 2013.  ^ Kageyama, Yuri (November 12, 2012)
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Lincoln Town Car
The Lincoln Town Car
Lincoln Town Car
is a model line of full-size luxury sedans that was marketed by the Lincoln division of the American automaker Ford Motor Company from 1981 to 2011. Taking its nameplate from a limousine body style, the Lincoln Town Car
Lincoln Town Car
first appeared in 1959 as a rare sub-model of the Continental, returning as a Lincoln trim line from 1969 to 1980. Following a revision of the Lincoln model line, the Lincoln Town Car
Lincoln Town Car
became a distinct product line for 1981, replacing the Continental as the full-size Lincoln. From 1981 to its 2011 discontinuation, the Town Car was marketed as the flagship Lincoln sedan. Lincoln Town Cars were produced in three generations, each based on the Ford Panther platform
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Fenghuang
Fenghuang
Fenghuang
(simplified Chinese: 凤凰; traditional Chinese: 鳳凰; pinyin: fènghuáng; Wade–Giles: fêng⁴-huang²) are mythological birds of East Asia
East Asia
that reign over all other birds
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Cadillac De Ville Series
The Cadillac
Cadillac
DeVille was originally a trim level and later a separate model produced by Cadillac. The first car to bear the name was the 1949 Coupe
Coupe
de Ville, a pillarless two-door hardtop body style with a prestige trim level above that of the Series 62 luxury coupe. The last model to be formally known as a DeVille was the 2005 Cadillac
Cadillac
DeVille, a full-size sedan, the largest car in the Cadillac
Cadillac
model range at the time
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Japanese Asset Price Bubble
The Japanese asset price bubble
Japanese asset price bubble
(バブル景気, baburu keiki, "bubble condition") was an economic bubble in Japan
Japan
from 1986 to 1991 in which real estate and stock market prices were greatly inflated.[1] In early 1992, this price bubble collapsed. The bubble was characterized by rapid acceleration of asset prices and overheated economic activity, as well as an uncontrolled money supply and credit expansion.[2] More specifically, over-confidence and speculation regarding asset and stock prices had been closely associated with excessive monetary easing policy at the time.[3] By August 1990, the Nikkei stock index had plummeted to half its peak by the time of the fifth monetary tightening by the Bank of Japan (BOJ).[2] By late 1991, asset prices began to fall. Even though asset prices had visibly collapsed by early 1992,[2] the economy's decline continued for more than a decade
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Isuzu Statesman De Ville
Statesman was an automotive marque created in 1971 by Holden
Holden
and sold in Australasia.[1] Statesman vehicles were sold through Holden dealerships, and were initially based on the mainstream Holden
Holden
HQ station wagon platform, thereby providing more interior room and generally more luxurious features than their Holden
Holden
sedan siblings. Production ceased with the last of the WB series cars in 1984. GM Holden
Holden
re-introduced the range in 1990 with two long-wheelbase sedans; however, the cars were no longer marketed as Statesman by brand name, but instead as the Holden
Holden
Statesman and the Holden Caprice
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Multiplexing
In telecommunications and computer networks, multiplexing (sometimes contracted to muxing) is a method by which multiple analog or digital signals are combined into one signal over a shared medium. The aim is to share a scarce resource. For example, in telecommunications, several telephone calls may be carried using one wire. Multiplexing originated in telegraphy in the 1870s, and is now widely applied in communications. In telephony, George Owen Squier
George Owen Squier
is credited with the development of telephone carrier multiplexing in 1910. The multiplexed signal is transmitted over a communication channel such as a cable. The multiplexing divides the capacity of the communication channel into several logical channels, one for each message signal or data stream to be transferred
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Susono, Shizuoka
Susono (裾野市, Susono-shi) is a city located in eastern Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan. The city, which covers an area of 138.12 square kilometres (53.33 sq mi), had an estimated population in December 2016 of 52,338, giving a population density of 379 persons per km2.Contents1 The Mottos of Susono City 2 Geography2.1 Surrounding municipalities3 History 4 Economy 5 Education 6 Transportation6.1 Railways 6.2 Highways7 Local attractions7.1 Recreational facilities 7.2 Events held in Susono8 Sister City relations 9 References 10 External linksThe Mottos of Susono City[edit]Enjoy working and make a healthy city. Be kind to people and make living in the city more pleasant. Maintain social order and build a peaceful city. Protect nature and make a beautiful city. Respect old traditions and make a cultured city.Geography[edit] Susono is located in far eastern Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan, in the foothills of Mount Fuji, and the Hakone Mountains
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Engine
An engine or motor is a machine designed to convert one form of energy into mechanical energy.[1][2] Heat
Heat
engines burn a fuel to create heat which is then used to do work. Electric motors convert electrical energy into mechanical motion; pneumatic motors use compressed air; and clockwork motors in wind-up toys use elastic energy
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Blackletter
Blackletter
Blackletter
(sometimes black letter), also known as Gothic script, Gothic minuscule, or Textura, was a script used throughout Western Europe from approximately 1150 to well into the 17th century.[1] It continued to be used for the Danish language
Danish language
until 1875,[2] and for German until the 20th century. Fraktur
Fraktur
is a notable script of this type, and sometimes the entire group of blackletter faces is incorrectly referred to as Fraktur
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Transmission (mechanics)
A transmission is a machine in a power transmission system, which provides controlled application of the power. Often the term transmission refers simply to the gearbox that uses gears and gear trains to provide speed and torque conversions from a rotating power source to another device.[1][2] In British English, the term transmission refers to the whole drivetrain, including clutch, gearbox, prop shaft (for rear-wheel drive), differential, and final drive shafts. In American English, however, the term refers more specifically to the gearbox alone, and detailed usage differs.[note 1] The most common use is in motor vehicles, where the transmission adapts the output of the internal combustion engine to the drive wheels. Such engines need to operate at a relatively high rotational speed, which is inappropriate for starting, stopping, and slower travel. The transmission reduces the higher engine speed to the slower wheel speed, increasing torque in the process
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Manual Transmission
Animation: shifting mechanism of a gearbox with 4 gearsA manual transmission, also known as a manual gearbox, or colloquially in some countries (e.g. the United States) as a stick shift is a type of transmission used in motor vehicle applications. It uses a driver-operated clutch engaged and disengaged by a foot pedal (automobile) or hand lever (motorcycle), for regulating torque transfer from the engine to the transmission; and a gear selector operated by hand (automobile) or by foot (motorcycle). A conventional 5-speed manual transmission is often the standard equipment in a base-model vehicle, while more expensive manual vehicles are usually equipped with a 6-speed transmission instead; other options include automatic transmissions such as a traditional automatic (hydraulic planetary) transmission (often a manumatic), a semi-automatic transmission, or a continuously variable transmission (CVT)
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Automatic Transmission
An automatic transmission, also called auto, self-shifting transmission, n-speed automatic (where n is its number of forward gear ratios), or AT, is a type of motor vehicle transmission that can automatically change gear ratios as the vehicle moves, freeing the driver from having to shift gears manually. Like other transmission systems on vehicles, it allows an internal combustion engine, best suited to run at a relatively high rotational speed, to provide a range of speed and torque outputs necessary for vehicular travel. The number of forward gear ratios is often expressed for manual transmissions as well (e.g., 6-speed manual). The most popular form found in automobiles is the hydraulic automatic transmission. Similar but larger devices are also used for heavy-duty commercial and industrial vehicles and equipment. This system uses a fluid coupling in place of a friction clutch, and accomplishes gear changes by hydraulically locking and unlocking a system of planetary gears
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Wheelbase
In both road and rail vehicles, the wheelbase is the distance between the centers of the front and rear wheels. For road vehicles with more than two axles (e.g. some trucks), the wheelbase is defined as the distance between the steering (front) axle and the centerpoint of the driving axle group. In the case of a tri-axle truck, the wheelbase would be the distance between the steering axle and a point midway between the two rear axles. Wheelbase
Wheelbase
(measured between rotational centers of wheels)Contents1 Vehicles1.1 Varying wheelbases within nameplate 1.2 Bikes 1.3 Skateboards2 Rail 3 See also 4 ReferencesVehicles[edit] The wheelbase of a vehicle equals the distance between its front and rear wheels. At equilibrium, the total torque of the forces acting on a vehicle is zero
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