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Townsville
Townsville
Townsville
is a city on the north-eastern coast of Queensland, Australia
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Allan Cunningham (botanist)
Allan Cunningham (13 July 1791 – 27 June 1839) was an English botanist and explorer, primarily known for his travels in Australia
Australia
to collect plants.Contents1 Early life 2 Brazil
B

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Lands Administrative Divisions Of Australia
Lands administrative divisions of Australia
Australia
are the cadastral divisions of Australia
Australia
for the purposes of identification of land to ensure security of land ownership. Most states term these divisions as counties, parishes, hundreds, and other terms. The eastern states of Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania
Tasmania
were divided into counties and parishes in the 19th century, although the Tasmanian counties were renamed land districts in the 20th century. Parts of South Australia
Australia
(south-east) and Western Australia
Australia
(south-west) were similarly divided into counties, and there were also five counties in a small part of the Northern Territory
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Phillip Parker King
Parker
Parker
may refer to:Contents1 Persons 2 Places2.1 Place names in the United States 2.2 Elsewhere3 Companies 4 Schools 5 Other 6 See alsoPersons[edit] Parker
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Federal Court Of Australia
The Federal Court of Australia
Australia
is an Australian superior court of record which has jurisdiction to deal with most civil disputes governed by federal law (with the exception of family law matters), along with some summary (less serious) criminal matters. Cases are heard at first instance by single Judges. The Court includes an appeal division referred to as the Full Court comprising three Judges, the only avenue of appeal from which lies to the High Court of Australia. In the Australian court hierarchy, the Federal Court occupies a position equivalent to the Supreme Courts of each of the states and territories. In relation to the other Courts in the federal stream, it is equal to the Family Court of Australia, and superior to the Federal Circuit Court
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Indigenous Australians
Indigenous Australians
Australians
are the Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Torres Strait
Islander people of Australia, descended from groups that existed in Australia and surrounding islands prior to British colonisation. The time of arrival of the first Indigenous Australians
Australians
is a matter of debate among researchers. The earliest definitely human remains found in Australia
Australia
are those of Mungo Man
Mungo Man
LM3 and Mungo Lady, which have been dated to around 50,000 years BP.[2] Recent archaeological evidence from the analysis of charcoal and artifacts revealing human use suggests a date as early as 65,000 B.P.[3][4] Luminescence dating has suggested habitation in Arnhem Land
Arnhem Land
as far back as 60,000 years BP.[5] Genetic research has inferred a date of habitation as early as 80,000 years BP
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National Park
A national park is a park in use for conservation purposes. Often it is a reserve of natural, semi-natural, or developed land that a sovereign state declares or owns. Although individual nations designate their own national parks differently, there is a common idea: the conservation of 'wild nature' for posterity and as a symbol of national pride.[1] An international organization, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and its World Commission on Protected Areas, has defined "National Park" as its Category II type of protected areas. While this type of national park had been proposed previously, the United States established the first "public park or pleasuring-ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people", Yellowstone National Park, in 1872.[2] Although Yellowstone was not officially termed a "national park" in its establishing law, it was always termed such in practice[3] and is widely held to be the first and oldest national park in the world
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Aquarium
An aquarium (plural: aquariums or aquaria) is a vivarium of any size having at least one transparent side in which aquatic plants or animals are kept and displayed. Fishkeepers use aquaria to keep fish, invertebrates, amphibians, aquatic reptiles such as turtles, and aquatic plants
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Electorates Of The Australian States And Territories
A State Electoral District is an electorate within the Lower House or Legislative Assembly of Australian states and territories. Most state electoral districts (except Australian Capital Territory
Australian Capital Territory
and Tasmania, which have multi-member electorates using a proportional voting method) send a single member to a state or territory's parliament using the preferential method of voting. The size of a state electoral district is dependent upon the Electoral Acts in the various states and vary in size between them. At present, there are 409 state electoral districts in Australia. State electoral districts do not apply to the Upper House, or Legislative Council, in those states that have one (New South Wales, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia)
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Divisions Of The Australian House Of Representatives
In Australia, electoral districts for the Australian House of Representatives are called divisions or more commonly referred to as electorates or seats. There are currently 150 single-member electorates for the Australian House of Representatives.Contents1 Constitutional and legal requirements 2 Apportionment 3 Naming 4 List of Divisions in 20164.1 New South Wales 4.2 Victoria 4.3 Queensland 4.4 Western Australia 4.5 South Australia 4.6 Tasmania 4.7 Australian Capital Territory 4.8 Northern Territory5 Abolished Divisions 6 See also 7 External links 8 ReferencesConstitutional and legal requirements[edit] Section 24 of the Constitution of Australia
Australia
requires that the total number of members of the Australian House of Representatives
Australian House of Representatives
shall be "as nearly as practicable" twice as many as the number of members of the Australian Senate
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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UTC+10
UTC+10:00 is an identifier for a time offset from UTC of +10. This time is used in:Contents1 As standard time (all year round)1.1 North Asia 1.2 Oceania 1.3 Antarctica2 As standard time (Southern hemisphere winter only)2.1 Oceania3 See also 4 References 5 External linksAs standard time (all year round)[edit] Principal cities: Brisbane North Asia[edit] Russia
Russia
- Vladivostok TimeOceania[edit] United States
United States
- Chamorro Time Zone Guam
Guam
(territory) Northern Mariana Islands
Northern Mariana Islands
(commonwealth)Federated States of MicronesiaChuuk, Yap
Yap
and surrounding areaPapua New Guinea Australia
Australia
- Eastern Standard Time (AEST)QueenslandAntarctica[edit]Some bases in Antarctica
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Time In Australia
Australia uses three main time zones: Australian Western Standard Time (AWST; UTC+08:00), Australian Central Standard Time (ACST; UTC+09:30), and Australian Eastern Standard Time (AEST; UTC+10:00).[1] Time is regulated by the individual state governments,[2] some of which observe daylight saving time (DST). Australia's external territories observe different time zones. Standard time was introduced in the 1890s when all of the Australian colonies adopted it. Before the switch to standard time zones, each local city or town was free to determine its local time, called local mean time
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HMS Pandora (1779)
HMS Pandora was a 24-gun Porcupine-class sixth-rate post ship of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
launched in May 1779.[1] She is best known as the ship sent in 1790 to search for the Bounty mutineers. The Pandora was partially successful by capturing 14 of the mutineers, but was wrecked on the Great Barrier Reef
Great Barrier Reef
on the return voyage in 1791.[2] The Pandora is considered to be one of the most significant shipwrecks in the Southern Hemisphere.[3]Contents1 Early service 2 Voyage in search of the Bounty 3 Wrecked 4 Wreck site: discovery and archaeology 5 Citations 6 References 7 External linksEarly service[edit] Her first service was in the Channel during the 1779 threatened invasion by the combined fleets of France and Spain. She was deployed in North American waters during the American War Of Independence and saw service as a convoy escort between England and Quebec
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Great Barrier Reef
The Great Barrier Reef
The Great Barrier Reef
is the world's largest coral reef system[1][2] composed of over 2,900 individual reefs[3] and 900 islands stretching for over 2,300 kilometres (1,400 mi) over an area of approximately 344,400 square kilometres (133,000 sq mi).[4][5] The reef is located in the Coral
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Native Police
Australian native police
Australian native police
units, consisting of Aboriginal troopers under the command usually of a single white officer, existed in various forms in all Australian mainland colonies during the nineteenth and, in some cases, into the twentieth centuries. The Native Police were utilised as a cost effective and brutal paramilitary instrument in the expansion and protection of the British colonial frontier in Australia. Mounted Aboriginal troopers of the Native Police, armed with rifles, carbines and swords escorted surveying groups, pastoralists and prospectors into frontier areas. They would usually then establish base camps and patrol these areas to enforce warrants, conduct punitive missions against resisting local aboriginal groups, and fulfil various other duties
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