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Tourism In Paris
Tourism in Paris
Paris
is a major income source for Paris
Paris
and the city ranks in the world's most visited cities
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Gargoyle
In architecture, a gargoyle (/ˈɡɑːrɡɔɪl/) is a carved or formed grotesque[1] with a spout designed to convey water from a roof and away from the side of a building, thereby preventing rainwater from running down masonry walls and eroding the mortar between. Architects often used multiple gargoyles on buildings to divide the flow of rainwater off the roof to minimize the potential damage from a rainstorm. A trough is cut in the back of the gargoyle and rainwater typically exits through the open mouth. Gargoyles are usually an elongated fantastical animal because the length of the gargoyle determines how far water is directed from the wall
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Winged Victory Of Samothrace
The Winged Victory of Samothrace, also called the Nike of Samothrace,[2] is a marble Hellenistic sculpture
Hellenistic sculpture
of Nike (the Greek goddess of victory), that was created about the 2nd century BC. Since 1884, it has been prominently displayed at the Louvre
Louvre
and is one of the most celebrated sculptures in the world. H.W
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Victor Laloux
Victor Alexandre Frederic Laloux (15 November 1850 – 13 July 1937) was a French Beaux-Arts architect and teacher.Contents1 Life 2 Work 3 Influence 4 External links 5 ReferencesLife[edit] Born in Tours, Laloux studied at the Paris École des Beaux-Arts atelier of Louis-Jules André, with his studies interrupted by the Franco-Prussian War, and was awarded the annual Prix de Rome
Prix de Rome
in 1878. He spent 1879 through 1882 at the Villa Medici
Villa Medici
in Rome. On his return to France Laloux rose quickly through the academic system, serving on many juries, societies and foundations. As practitioner, he produced major commissions in a highly ornamented neo-classical surface style, collaborating with sculptors and muralists squarely in the Beaux-Arts tradition, but doing so on innovative cast-iron frames
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Émile Bernard (painter)
Émile Henri Bernard (28 April 1868 – 16 April 1941) was a French Post-Impressionist
Post-Impressionist
painter and writer, who had artistic friendships with Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin
Paul Gauguin
and Eugène Boch,[1] and at a later time, Paul Cézanne. Most of his notable work was accomplished at a young age, in the years 1886 through 1897
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King Philippe Auguste
Philip II, known as Philip Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste; 21 August 1165 – 14 July 1223), was King of France
King of France
from 1180 to 1223, a member of the House of Capet
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French Revolution
The French Revolution
Revolution
(French: Révolution française [ʁevɔlysjɔ̃ fʁɑ̃sɛːz]) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France
France
and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799. It was partially carried forward by Napoleon
Napoleon
during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution
Revolution
overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon
Napoleon
who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond
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I. M. Pei
Ieoh Ming Pei, FAIA, RIBA[1] (born 26 April 1917), commonly known as I. M. Pei, is a Chinese American
Chinese American
architect. Born in Guangzhou
Guangzhou
and raised in Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and Shanghai, Pei drew inspiration at an early age from the gardens at Suzhou. In 1935, he moved to the United States
United States
and enrolled in the University of Pennsylvania's architecture school, but quickly transferred to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was unhappy with the focus at both schools on Beaux-Arts architecture, and spent his free time researching emerging architects, especially Le Corbusier. After graduating, he joined the Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) and became a friend of the Bauhaus
Bauhaus
architects Walter Gropius and Marcel Breuer. In 1948, Pei was recruited by New York City real estate magnate William Zeckendorf
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Leonardo Da Vinci
Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (Italian: [leoˈnardo di ˌsɛr ˈpjɛːro da (v)ˈvintʃi] ( listen); 15 April 1452 – 2 May 1519), more commonly Leonardo da Vinci
Leonardo da Vinci
or simply Leonardo, was an Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance
polymath whose areas of interest included invention, painting, sculpting, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, writing, history, and cartography. He has been variously called the father of palaeontology, ichnology, and architecture, and is widely considered one of the greatest painters of all time
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Mona Lisa
The Mona Lisa
Mona Lisa
(/ˌmoʊnə ˈliːsə/; Italian: Monna Lisa [ˈmɔnna ˈliːza] or La Gioconda [la dʒoˈkonda], French: La Joconde [la ʒɔkɔ̃d]) is a half-length portrait painting by the Italian Renaissance
Renaissance
artist Leonardo da Vinci
Leonardo da Vinci
that has been described as "the best known, the most visited, the most written about, the most sung about, the most parodied work of art in the world".[1] The Mona Lisa is also one of the most valuable paintings in the world. It holds the Guinness World Record for the highest known insurance valuation in history at $100 million in 1962,[2] which is worth nearly $800 million in 2017.[3] The painting is thought to be a portrait of Lisa Gherardini, the wife of Francesco del Giocondo, and is in oil on a white Lombardy poplar panel
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Venus Of Milo
Aphrodite
Aphrodite
of Milos
Milos
(Greek: Αφροδίτη της Μήλου, Aphroditi tis Milou), better known as the Venus de Milo, is an ancient Greek statue and one of the most famous works of ancient Greek sculpture. Initially it was attributed to the sculptor Praxiteles, however from an inscription that was on its plinth, the statue is thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch. Created sometime between 130 and 100 BC, the statue is believed to depict Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love and beauty (Venus to the Romans). It is a marble sculpture, slightly larger than life size at 203 cm (6 ft 8 in) high. Part of an arm and the original plinth were lost following its discovery. It is currently on permanent display at the Louvre Museum in Paris
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Liberty Leading The People
Liberty
Liberty
Leading the People (French: La Liberté guidant le peuple [la libɛʁte ɡidɑ̃ lə pœpl]) is a painting by Eugène Delacroix commemorating the July Revolution
July Revolution
of 1830, which toppled King Charles X of France. A woman personifying the concept and the Goddess of Liberty
Liberty
leads the people forward over a barricade and the bodies of the fallen, holding the flag of the French Revolution
French Revolution
– the tricolour flag, which remains France's national flag – in one hand and brandishing a bayonetted musket with the other
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Napoleonic Wars
The Napoleonic Wars
Napoleonic Wars
(1803–1815) were a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon
Napoleon
I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, financed and usually led by the United Kingdom. The wars stemmed from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution
French Revolution
and its resultant conflict. The wars are often categorised into five conflicts, each termed after the coalition that fought Napoleon; the Third Coalition
Third Coalition
(1805), the Fourth (1806–07), Fifth (1809), Sixth (1813), and the Seventh and final (1815). Napoleon, upon ascending to First Consul of France
France
in 1799, had inherited a chaotic republic; he subsequently created a state with stable finances, a strong bureaucracy, and a well-trained army
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Dying Slave
The Dying Slave
Dying Slave
is a sculpture by the Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance
artist Michelangelo. Created between 1513 and 1516, it was to serve with another figure, the Rebellious Slave, at the tomb of Pope Julius II.[1] It is a marble figure 2.15 metres (7' 4") in height, and is held at the Louvre, Paris. In 1976 the art historian Richard Fly wrote that it "suggests that moment when life capitulates before the relentless force of dead matter".[2] However, in a recent scholarly volume entitled The Slave in European Art, Charles Robertson discusses the Dying Slave
Dying Slave
in the context of real slavery in Italy
Italy
during the time of the Renaissance.[3] Twelve reproductions of the Dying Slave
Dying Slave
adorn the top storey of the 12th arrondissement police station in Paris
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Michelangelo
Michelangelo
Michelangelo
di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni or more commonly known by his first name Michelangelo
Michelangelo
(/ˌmaɪkəlˈændʒəloʊ/; Italian: [mikeˈlandʒelo di lodoˈviːko
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Maurice De Sully
Maurice de Sully (died 11 September 1196) was Bishop of Paris
Bishop of Paris
from 1160 until his death. Biography[edit] He was born of humble parents at Sully-sur-Loire
Sully-sur-Loire
(Soliacum), near Orléans, at the beginning of the twelfth century. He came to Paris towards hi 1140 and studied for the ecclesiastical state. He soon became known as an able professor of theology and an eloquent preacher. It has been frequently asserted, but without sufficient proof, that he was canon of Bourges. In 1159 he appears as Archdeacon of Paris
Paris
and on 12 October 1160, largely through the influence of Louis VII, he was elected to succeed Peter Lombard
Peter Lombard
in the episcopal see of that city. The present Cathedral of Notre-Dame stands as a monument to his episcopal administration. Its construction was begun and almost entirely completed under him
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