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Toubas
Tubas
Tubas
(/ˈtjuːbəs/; Arabic: طوباس‎, Tûbâs) is a Palestinian city in the northeastern West Bank, located northeast of Nablus, west of the Jordan
Jordan
Valley. A city of over 16,000 inhabitants, it serves as the economic and administrative center of the Tubas
Tubas
Governorate. Its urban area consists of 2,271 dunams (227 hectares). It is governed by a municipal council of 15 members and most of its working inhabitants are employed in agriculture or public services. Jamal Abu Mohsin has been the mayor of Tubas
Tubas
since being elected in 2005. Tubas
Tubas
has been identified as the ancient town of Thebez (/ˈθiːbɛz/), a Canaanite town famous for revolting against King Abimelech
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State Of Palestine
Coordinates: 32°00′N 35°15′E / 32.000°N 35.250°E / 32.000; 35.250State of Palestine[i] دولة فلسطين (Arabic) Dawlat FilasṭīnFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "فدائي" "Fida'i"[1][2] "My Redemption"Territory claimed by the State of Palestine
State of Palestine
(green)[3] Territory also claimed by Israel
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Wadi Al-Far'a
Wadi al- Far'a
Far'a
(Arabic: وادي الفارعة‎) is a Palestinian village in the Tubas Governorate
Tubas Governorate
in the northeastern West Bank
West Bank
located five kilometers southwest of Tubas. It has a land area of 12,000 dunams, of which 337 is built-up and 10,500 are for agricultural purposes. It is under the complete control of the Palestinian National Authority and is adjacent to the Far'a
Far'a
refugee camp.[1] According to the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics, Wadi al- Far'a
Far'a
had a population of 2,340 inhabitants.[2]Contents1 Name spelling 2 Archaeology 3 History 4 Demographics 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksName spelling[edit] The Arabic name of Wadi al- Far'a
Far'a
is spelled on maps, in books and other sources in a wide array of ways
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Book Of Judges
The Book
Book
of Judges (Hebrew: Sefer Shoftim ספר שופטים) is the seventh book of the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
and the Christian Bible
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Shechem
Shechem
Shechem
/ˈʃɛkəm/, also spelled Sichem (/ˈsɪkəm/; Hebrew: שְׁכָם‬ / שְׁכֶם‬ Standard Šəḵem Tiberian Šeḵem, "shoulder"), was a Canaanite city mentioned in the Amarna letters, and is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible
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Woman Of Thebez
The woman of Thebez is a character in the Hebrew Bible, appearing in the Book of Judges. She dropped a millstone from a wall in order to kill Abimelech. Abimlech had laid siege to Thebez and entered the city. The residents had fled into a citadel within the city which Abimelech planned to burn. Judges 9:53 then says, "A certain woman threw an upper millstone upon Abimelech's head, and crushed his skull." Herbert Lockyer calls this woman "an obscure daughter of Israel, who was to become the instrument of heaven to punish a sinner too bold and wicked to live." He goes on to say, "Alas, there was no one to record the name and sing the praise of this heroine who must have received the gratitude of the now liberated people of the city!"[1] Carole R. Fontaine sees this woman as an example of the motif of the "woman who brings death" in the Old Testament.[2] References[edit]^ Herbert Lockyer, All the Women of the Bible. 1988. "Woman of Thebez". ^ Carole R
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Shame
Shame
Shame
is a painful, social emotion[further explanation needed] that can be seen as resulting "...from comparison of the self's action with the self's standards...".[1] but which may equally stem from comparison of the self's state of being with the ideal social context's standard. Thus, shame may stem from volitional action or simply self-regard; no action by the shamed being is required: simply existing is enough. Both the comparison and standards are enabled by socialization
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Olive Press
Olive oil
Olive oil
extraction is the process of extracting the oil present in olive drupes, known as olive oil. Olive oil
Olive oil
is produced in the mesocarp cells, and stored in a particular type of vacuole called a lipo vacuole, i.e., every cell contains a tiny olive oil droplet. Olive oil
Olive oil
extraction is the process of separating the oil from the other fruit contents (vegetative extract liquid and solid material). It is possible to attain this separation by physical means alone, i.e., oil and water do not mix, so they are relatively easy to separate
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Jerome
Catholicism portal Philosophy
Philosophy
portalv t e Jerome
Jerome
(/dʒəˈroʊm/; Latin: Eusebius
Eusebius
Sophronius Hieronymus; Greek: Εὐσέβιος Σωφρόνιος Ἱερώνυμος; c. 27 March 347 – 30 September 420) was a priest, confessor, theologian, and historian. He was born at Stridon, a village near Emona
Emona
on the border of Dalmatia and Pannonia.[2][3][4] He is best known for his translation of most of the Bible
Bible
into Latin
Latin
(the translation that became known as the Vulgate), and his commentaries on the Gospels. His list of writings is extensive.[5] The protégé of Pope
Pope
Damasus I, who died in December of 384, Jerome was known for his teachings on Christian moral life, especially to those living in cosmopolitan centers such as Rome
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Roman Mile
The mile is an English unit of length of linear measure equal to 5,280 feet, or 1,760 yards, and standardised as exactly 1,609.344 metres by international agreement in 1959. With qualifiers, "mile" is also used to describe or translate a wide range of units derived from or roughly equivalent to the Roman mile, such as the nautical mile (now 1.852 km exactly), the Italian mile (roughly 1.852 km), and the Chinese mile (now 500 m exactly). The Romans divided their mile into 5,000 feet but the greater importance of furlongs in pre-modern England meant that the statute mile was made equivalent to 8 furlongs or 5,280 feet in 1593. This form of the mile then spread to the British-colonized nations who continue to employ the mile. The US Geological Survey now employs the metre for official purposes but legacy data from its 1927 geodetic datum has meant that a separate US survey mile (6336/3937 km) continues to see some use
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Nahiya
A nāḥiyah (Arabic: ناحية‎ [ˈnæːħijæ], plural nawāḥī نواحي [næˈwæːħiː]), or nahia, is a regional or local type of administrative division that usually consists of a number of villages and/or sometimes smaller towns. In Tajikistan, it is a second-level division while in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan, Xinjiang, and the former Ottoman Empire, where it was also called a bucak, it is a third-level or lower division
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Liwa (Arabic)
Liwa, or Liwā’ (Arabic: لواء‎), is an Arabic
Arabic
term meaning ensign, or banner. The word has developed various other meanings in Arabic:a banner, in all senses (flag, advertising banner, election publicity banner, etc.)[1] a district;[2] see also: banner (country subdivision) a level of military unit with its own ensign, now used as the equivalent to brigade[3] an officer commanding a number of liwa units, now equivalent to a major general[4]Liwa was used interchangeably with the Turkish term "Sanjak" in the time of the Ottoman Empire. After the fall of the empire, the term was used in the Arab countries formerly under Ottoman rule. It was gradually replaced by other terms like qadaa and mintaqa and is now defunct
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Muslim
65–75% Sunni
Sunni
Islam[22][note 1] 10–13% Shia
Shia
Islam[22] 15–20% Non-denominational Islam[23] ~1% Ahmadiyya[24] ~1% Other Muslim
Muslim
traditions, e.g
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Mount Gerizim
Mount Gerizim
Mount Gerizim
(/ˈɡɛrɪˌzɪm/; Samaritan
Samaritan
Hebrew: ࠄࠟࠓࠂࠝࠓࠜࠉࠆࠜࠉࠌ translit. Īargerēzēm; Hebrew: Tiberian Hebrew
Hebrew
הַר גְּרִזִים‬ translit. Har Gərīzīm, Modern Hebrew: הַר גְּרִיזִים‬ translit. Har Gərizim; Arabic: جَبَل جَرِزِيم‎ Jabal Jarizīm or Arabic: جبل الطور‎ Jabal et Tur) is one of the two mountains in the immediate vicinity of the West Bank
West Bank
city of Nablus
Nablus
(biblical Shechem), and forms the southern side of the valley in which Nablus
Nablus
is situated, the northern side being formed by Mount Ebal
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Edward Robinson (scholar)
Edward Robinson (April 10, 1794 – January 27, 1863) was an American biblical scholar. He studied in the United States
United States
and Germany, a center of biblical scholarship and exploration of the Bible as history. He translated scriptural works from classical languages, as well as German translations
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Kardala
Kardala (Arabic: كردلة‎) is a Palestinian hamlet located in the Tubas Governorate, 13 kilometers northeast of Tubas adjacent to Bardala in the west and Ein al-Beida in the east. It had a population of 160 inhabitants in 2006. It is located on the eastern foothills of the northern Jordan Valley on a fertile plain of land. It is situated at a low elevation of -99 meters below sea level.[1] Kardala was established in the 1930s. The founders were members of the Daraghmah clan from Tubas who worked as farmers and raised livestock. After the 1948-Arab Israeli War, the A’Hashah family from the Gaza area migrated here as Palestinian refugees. Despite being under the population limit, Kardala is governed by a village council, although instead of consisting of seven members, the council is made up of three members.[1] Nearly all working residents, spend their livelihoods in agriculture. Of the hamlet's 800 dunams, 250 are arable lands. The built-up area of the village is 30 dunams
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