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Tori No Uta
"Tori no Uta" (鳥の詩, lit. "Bird's Poem") is a Japanese trance song sung by Lia, written by Jun Maeda, composed by Shinji Orito, and arranged by Kazuya Takase. The song was recorded at Paramount Studio in Los Angeles
Los Angeles
by the visual novel studio Key through their record label Key Sounds Label
Key Sounds Label
for use as the opening theme of Key's 2000 visual novel Air.[1] A short version of the song was first released on I've Sound's July 2000 compilation album Verge. The full version of "Tori no Uta" first appeared on the limited edition remix album Ornithopter (September 2000) originally bundled with the first printing release of the Air game,[2] though "Tori no Uta" was not remixed on the album. The song was later widely distributed on the Air Original Soundtrack
Soundtrack
(2002), the soundtrack of the visual novel.[3] The song was later featured as the opening theme to the Air anime series in 2005
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Song
A song, most broadly, is a single (and often standalone) work of music that is typically intended to be sung by the human voice with distinct and fixed pitches and patterns using sound and silence and a variety of forms that often include the repetition of sections. Written words created specifically for music or for which music is specifically created, are called lyrics. If a pre-existing poem is set to composed music in classical music it is an art song. Songs that are sung on repeated pitches without distinct contours and patterns that rise and fall are called chants. Songs in a simple style that are learned informally are often referred to as folk songs. Songs that are composed for professional singers who sell their recordings or live shows to the mass market are called popular songs. These songs, which have broad appeal, are often composed by professional songwriters, composers and lyricists
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Refrain
A refrain (from Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
refringere, "to repeat", and later from Old French
Old French
refraindre) is the line or lines that are repeated in music or in verse; the "chorus" of a song. Poetic fixed forms that feature refrains include the villanelle, the virelay, and the sestina. The use of refrains is particularly associated with where the verse-chorus-verse song structure typically places a refrain in almost every song
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B Minor
B minor
B minor
is a minor scale based on B, consisting of the pitches B, C♯, D, E, F♯, G, and A. Its key signature consists of two sharps. Its relative major is D major
D major
and its parallel major is B major. The B natural minor scale is:Changes needed for the melodic and harmonic versions of the scale are written in with accidentals as necessary
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Key (music)
In music theory, the key of a piece is the group of pitches, or scale, that forms the basis of a music composition in classical, Western art, and Western pop music. The group features a tonic note and its corresponding chords, also called a tonic or tonic chord, which provides a subjective sense of arrival and rest, and also has a unique relationship to the other pitches of the same group, their corresponding chords, and pitches and chords outside the group.[1] Notes and chords other than the tonic in a piece create varying degrees of tension, resolved when the tonic note or chord returns. The key may be in the major or minor mode, though musicians assume major in a statement like, "This piece is in C." Popular songs are usually in a key, and so is classical music during the common practice period, around 1650–1900
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Bar (music)
In musical notation, a bar (or measure) is a segment of time corresponding to a specific number of beats in which each beat is represented by a particular note value and the boundaries of the bar are indicated by vertical bar lines. Dividing music into bars provides regular reference points to pinpoint locations within a musical composition. It also makes written music easier to follow, since each bar of staff symbols can be read and played as a batch.[1] Typically, a piece consists of several bars of the same length, and in modern musical notation the number of beats in each bar is specified at the beginning of the score by the time signature
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Stanza
In poetry, a stanza (/ˈstænzə/; from Italian stanza [ˈstantsa], "room") is a grouped set of lines within a poem, usually set off from other stanzas by a blank line or indentation.[1] Stanzas can have regular rhyme and metrical schemes, though stanzas are not strictly required to have either. There are many unique forms of stanzas. Some stanzaic forms are simple, such as four-line quatrains. Other forms are more complex, such as the Spenserian stanza. Fixed verse poems, such as sestinas, can be defined by the number and form of their stanzas. The term stanza is similar to strophe, though strophe sometimes refers to irregular set of lines, as opposed to regular, rhymed stanzas.[2] The stanza in poetry is analogous with the paragraph that is seen in prose; related thoughts are grouped into units.[3] In music, groups of lines are typically referred to as verses
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G-sharp Minor
G-sharp minor
G-sharp minor
is a minor scale based on G♯, consisting of the pitches G♯, A♯, B, C♯, D♯, E, and F♯. Its key signature has five sharps. The G-sharp natural minor scale is:Changes needed for the melodic and harmonic versions of the scale are written in with accidentals as necessary. The G-sharp harmonic minor and melodic minor scales are:Its relative major is B major. Its parallel major, G-sharp major, is usually replaced by its enharmonic equivalent of A-flat major, since G-sharp major
G-sharp major
features an F in the key signature and A-flat major
A-flat major
only has four flats, making it rare for G♯ major to be used
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A-sharp Minor
A♯ minor is a minor scale based on A♯, consisting of the pitches A♯, B♯, C♯, D♯, E♯, F♯, and G♯. Its key signature has seven sharps. Its direct enharmonic equivalent is B♭ minor. The A♯ natural minor scale is:Changes needed for the melodic and harmonic versions of the scale are written in with accidentals as necessary. The A♯ harmonic minor and melodic minor scales are:Its relative major is C♯ major (or enharmonically D♭ major), and its parallel major is A♯ major, which is usually replaced by B♭ major, since A♯ major's three double-sharps make it impractical to use. Exceptions include Chopin's Polonaise-Fantaisie in A♭ major, Op. 61, which has a brief passage of about 6 bars (at m. 160, twelve bars after the start of the B major
B major
section) actually notated in A♯ major, inserting the necessary double-sharps as accidentals
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B-flat Minor
B♭ minor is a minor scale based on B♭, consisting of the pitches B♭, C, D♭, E♭, F, G♭, and A♭. Its key signature has five flats. Its relative major is D♭ major, its parallel major is B♭ major, and its enharmonic equivalent is A♯ minor, which is not used. The B♭ natural minor scale is:Changes needed for the melodic and harmonic versions of the scale are written in with accidentals as necessary. The B♭ harmonic minor and melodic minor scales are:Contents1 Characteristics 2 Notable classical compositions 3 References 4 External linksCharacteristics[edit] B♭ minor is traditionally a 'dark' key.[1] Important oboe solos in this key in the orchestral literature include the second movement of Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 4, which depicts "the feeling that you get when you are all alone"[citation needed] in Tchaikovsky's words. Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1 is also in B♭ minor
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C-sharp Minor
C♯ minor is a minor scale based on C♯, with the pitches C♯, D♯, E, F♯, G♯, A, and B. Its key signature consists of four sharps. Its relative major is E major. Its parallel major, C♯ major, is usually replaced by D♭ major, since C♯ major, which contains seven sharps, is not normally used. D♭ minor, having eight flats, including the B, has a similar problem. The C♯ natural minor scale is:Changes needed for the melodic and harmonic versions of the scale are written in with accidentals as necessary. The C♯ harmonic minor and melodic minor scales are:Contents1 Classical music in this key 2 Notable songs 3 References 4 External linksClassical music in this key[edit] See also: List of symphonies in C-sharp minor There are only two known symphonies in the 18th century written in this key
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Break (music)
In popular music, a break is an instrumental or percussion section during a song derived from or related to stop-time – being a "break" from the main parts of the song or piece. A break is usually interpolated between sections of a song, to provide a sense of anticipation, signal the start of a new section, or create variety in the arrangement.Contents1 Jazz 2 DJing and dance music 3 Break 4 Breakbeat (element of music) 5 Notable examples 6 See also 7 Sources 8 External linksJazz[edit] A solo break in jazz occurs when the rhythm section (piano, bass, drums) stops playing behind a soloist for a brief period, usually two or four bars leading into the soloist's first improvised solo chorus (at which point the rhythm section resumes playing). A notable recorded example is sax player Charlie Parker's solo break at the beginning of his solo on "A Night in Tunisia"
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Coda (music)
In music, a coda [ˈkoːda] (Italian for "tail", plural code) is a passage that brings a piece (or a movement) to an end. Technically, it is an expanded cadence. It may be as simple as a few bars, or as complex as an entire section.[1]Coda (It.) (1) The tail of a note. (2) The bars occasionally added to a contrapuntal movement after the close or finish of the canto fermo. (3) The few chords or bars attached to an infinite canon in order to render it finite; or a few chords not in a canon, added to a finite canon for the sake of obtaining a more harmonious conclusion. (4) That closing adjunct of any movement, or piece, specially intended to enforce a feeling of completeness and finality.[2]Contents1 In Classical Music1.1 Musical Purpose 1.2 Codetta2 History 3 In Popular Music (Pop) 4 In Music Notation 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesIn Classical Music[edit]Coda from Mozart's Piano Sonata no. 7 in C Major, K
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Variety Show
Variety shows, also known as variety arts or variety entertainment, is entertainment made up of a variety of acts including musical performances, sketch comedy, magic, acrobatics, juggling, and ventriloquism. It is normally introduced by a compère (master of ceremonies) or host. The variety format made its way from Victorian era stage to radio and then television. Variety shows were a staple of anglophone television from the late 1940s into the 1980s. While still widespread in some parts of the world, the proliferation of multichannel television and evolving viewer tastes affected the popularity of variety shows in the United States
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Synthesizer
A synthesizer (often abbreviated as synth, also spelled synthesiser) is an electronic musical instrument that generates electric signals that are converted to sound through instrument amplifiers and loudspeakers or headphones. Synthesizers may either imitate traditional musical instruments like piano, Hammond organ, flute, vocals; natural sounds like ocean waves, etc.; or generate novel electronic timbres. They are often played with a musical keyboard, but they can be controlled via a variety of other input devices, including music sequencers, instrument controllers, fingerboards, guitar synthesizers, wind controllers, and electronic drums. Synthesizers without built-in controllers are often called sound modules, and are controlled via USB, MIDI
MIDI
or CV/gate using a controller device, often a MIDI
MIDI
keyboard or other controller. Synthesizers use various methods to generate electronic signals (sounds)
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Piano
The piano is an acoustic, stringed musical instrument invented in Italy
Italy
by Bartolomeo Cristofori
Bartolomeo Cristofori
around the year 1700 (the exact year is uncertain), in which the strings are struck by hammers. It is played using a keyboard,[1] which is a row of keys (small levers) that the performer presses down or strikes with the fingers and thumbs of both hands to cause the hammers to strike the strings. The word piano is a shortened form of pianoforte, the Italian term for the early 1700s versions of the instrument, which in turn derives from gravicembalo col piano e forte[2] and fortepiano
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