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Tonatiuh
In Aztec
Aztec
mythology, Tonatiuh
Tonatiuh
(Nahuatl: Ōllin Tōnatiuh [oːlːin toːˈnatiʍ] "Movement of the Sun") was the sun god.[1] The Aztec people considered him the leader of Tollan, heaven. He was also known as the fifth sun, because the Aztecs believed that he was the sun that took over when the fourth sun was expelled from the sky.Contents1 Description 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] Aztec
Aztec
theology held that each sun was a god with its own cosmic era, the Aztecs believed they were still in Tonatiuh's era. According to the Aztec
Aztec
creation myth, the god demanded human sacrifice as tribute and without it would refuse to move through the sky
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Tonacacihuatl
In Aztec mythology, Tōnacacihuatl (Classical Nahuatl: Tonacacihuātl [toːnakaˈsiwaːt͡ɬ]) was a creator and goddess of fertility, worshiped for peopling the earth and making it fruitful.[1] Most Colonial-era manuscripts equate her with Ōmecihuātl.[2] Tōnacācihuātl was the consort of Tonacatecuhtli.[3] She is also referred to as Ilhuicacihuātl or "Heavenly Lady."[4]Contents1 Etymology 2 Origin and role 3 Notes 4 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The god's name is a compound of two Nahuatl words: "tōnacā" and "cihuātl."[5] While "cihuātl" can be translated "woman" or "lady," "tōnacā" presents several possible interpretations. Some read this root as "tonacā" (without the long 'o'), consisting of "nacatl," meaning "human flesh" or "food," with the possessive prefix "to" ("our")
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Solar Calendar
A solar calendar is a calendar whose dates indicate the season or almost equivalently the position of the apparent position of the sun in relative to the stars. The Gregorian calendar, widely accepted as standard in the world, is an example of solar calendar. The main other type of calendar is a lunar calendar, whose months correspond to cycles of moon phases. The months of the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
do not correspond to cycles of moon phase.Contents1 Examples1.1 Tropical solar calendars 1.2 Sidereal solar calendars2 Non-solar calendars 3 Lunisolar calendars 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksExamples[edit] The oldest solar calendars include the Julian calendar
Julian calendar
and the Coptic calendar. They both have a year of 365 days, which is extended to 366 once every four years, without exception, so have a mean year of 365.25 days
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Tepeyollotl
In Aztec mythology, Tepēyōllōtl Nahuatl pronunciation: [tepeːˈju˕ːɬːu˕ːtɬ] ("heart of the mountains"; also Tepeyollotli) was the god of earthquakes, echoes and jaguars. He is the god of the Eighth Hour of the Night, and is depicted as a jaguar leaping towards the sun. In the calendar, Tepeyollotl
Tepeyollotl
rules over both the third day, Calli (house), and the third trecena, 1-Mazatl (deer). He is the eighth Lord of the Night.[1] The word is derived as a compound of the Nahuatl
Nahuatl
words tepētl ("mountain"), and yōllōtl ("heart" or "interior"). Tepeyollotl
Tepeyollotl
is usually depicted as cross-eyed holding the typical white staff with green feathers
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Citlalicue
In Aztec mythology, Citlalicue (Nahuatl pronunciation: [sitɬaːˈlikʷe]) "star garment"; also Citlalinicue ( Nahuatl
Nahuatl
pronunciation: [sitɬaːliˈnikʷe]), Ilamatecuhtli ( Nahuatl
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Tlaltecuhtli
Tlaltecuhtli
Tlaltecuhtli
[t͡ɬaɬteˈkʷt͡ɬi] is a pre-Columbian Mesoamerican deity, identified from sculpture and iconography dating to the Late Postclassic period of Mesoamerican chronology
Mesoamerican chronology
(ca. 1200–1519), primarily among the Mexica
Mexica
(Aztec) and other Nahuatl-speaking cultures. Tlaltecuhtli
Tlaltecuhtli
is also known from several post-conquest manuscripts that surveyed Mexica
Mexica
mythology and belief systems, such as the Histoyre du méchique compiled in the mid-16th century.[1] According to Alfonso Caso[2] there were four earth gods - Tlaltecuhtli who was male and three earth goddesses - Coatlique, Cihuacoatl
Cihuacoatl
and Tlazolteotl
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Yacatecuhtli
In Aztec mythology, Yacatecuhtli (pronounced Ya-te-coo-tli) was the patron god of commerce and travelers, especially business travelers. His symbol is a bundle of sticks. Merchants would carry an uttal cane as they moved from village to village peddling their wares, and at night-time would tie them together into a neat bundle before sprinkling them with blood from their ears. It was believed that this ritual in Yacatecuhtli's honor would guarantee success in future business ventures, not to mention protection from vicious beasts and robbers on their journeys. His name means "lord of the nose" (Nahuatl yacatl, nose and tecuhtli, lord). [1] References[edit]^ "YACATECUHTLI". www.godslaidbare.com
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Zacatzontli
Zacatzontli, in Aztec mythology, is the god of day road, he has an eagle as sun's symbol guide. He holds in his left hand a staff and his right hand supports an backpack full of quetzals. He can be a protector of merchants, thus equating him with the Mayan god Ek Chuáj. He also helps travellers making him like Jokõjin and Jizu in Japanese mythology. One of the odd things about Zacatzontli
Zacatzontli
is that he doesn't have a headdress, only a feather. His name could mean Lord of the Road or His Road The Lord, although the former seems more likely.[1] See also[edit]List of Aztec gods Aztec religionSources[edit]^ Biblioteca Porrúa. Imprenta del Museo Nacional de Arqueología, Historia y Etnología, ed. (1905). Diccionario de Mitología Nahua (in Spanish). México. p. 161
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Tonacatecuhtli
In Aztec mythology, Tonacatecuhtli
Tonacatecuhtli
was a creator and fertility god, worshiped for peopling the earth and making it fruitful.[1] Most Colonial-era manuscripts equate him with Ōmetēuctli.[2] His consort was Tonacacihuatl.Contents1 Etymology 2 Origin and Role 3 Notes 4 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The god's name is a compound of two Nahuatl words: "tōnacā" and "tēcuhtli."[3] While "tēcuhtli" is generally translated "lord," "tōnacā" presents several possible interpretations. Some read this root as "tonacā" (without the long 'o'), consisting of "nacatl," meaning "human flesh" or "food," with the possessive prefix "to" ("our")
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Maya Civilization
The Maya civilization
Maya civilization
was a Mesoamerican civilization developed by the Maya peoples, and noted for its hieroglyphic script—the only known fully developed writing system of the pre-Columbian Americas—as well as for its art, architecture, mathematics, calendar, and astronomical system. The Maya civilization
Maya civilization
developed in an area that encompasses southeastern Mexico, all of Guatemala
Guatemala
and Belize, and the western portions of Honduras
Honduras
and El Salvador
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Spaniard
Spain
Spain
Nationals 41,539,400[1] (for a total population of 47,059,533) Hundreds of millions with Spanish ancestors in the Americas especially in the Hispanic
Hispanic
colonies Nationals Abroad : 2,183,043[2] Total abroad: 2,183,043,[3] which of them: 733
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Human Sacrifice
Note: Varies by jurisdictionAssassination Cannibalism Child murder Consensual homicide Contract killing Crime of passion Depraved-heart murder Execution-style murder Felony murder rule Feticide Honor killing Human sacrifice InfanticideChild sacrificeInternet homicide Lonely hearts killer Lust murder Lynching Mass murder Mass shooting Misdemeanor murder Murder–suicide Poisoning Proxy murder Pseudocommando Serial killer Spree killer Thrill killing Torture murder Vehicle-ramming attackManslaughterIn English law Voluntary manslaughter Negligent homicide Vehicular homicideNon-criminal homicideNote: Varies by jurisdictionAssisted suicide Capital punishment Euthanasia Feticide Justifiable homicide WarBy victim or victimsSuicideFamily Avunculicide (Nepoticide) Familicide M
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Creation Myth
A creation myth (or cosmogonic myth) is a symbolic narrative of how the world began and how people first came to inhabit it.[2][3][4] While in popular usage the term myth often refers to false or fanciful stories, members of cultures often ascribe varying degrees of truth to their creation myths.[5][6] In the society in which it is told, a creation myth is usually regarded as conveying profound truths, metaphorically, symbolically and sometimes in a historical or literal sense.[7][8] They are commonly, although not always, considered cosmogonical myths – that is, they describe the ordering of the cosmos from a state of chaos or amorphousness.[9] Creation myths often share a number of features
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Heaven
Heaven, or the heavens, is a common religious, cosmological, or transcendent place where beings such as gods, angels, spirits, saints, or venerated ancestors are said to originate, be enthroned, or live. According to the beliefs of some religions, heavenly beings can descend to earth or incarnate, and earthly beings can ascend to Heaven in the afterlife, or in exceptional cases enter Heaven
Heaven
alive. Heaven
Heaven
is often described as a "higher place", the holiest place, a Paradise, in contrast to Hell
Hell
or the Underworld
Underworld
or the "low places", and universally or conditionally accessible by earthly beings according to various standards of divinity, goodness, piety, faith, or other virtues or right beliefs or simply the will of God
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